Who’s Protecting Our Children?

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Education and Training

    Course : Human Growth and Development

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (7) The student understands the importance of care and protection of children. The student is expected to:
      • (A) determine agencies and services that protect the rights of children
      • (B) summarize various resources focusing on children
      • (C) predict the impact of changing demographics and cultural diversity on the health and welfare of children
      • (D) analyze forms, causes, effects, prevention and treatment of child abuse
      • (E) explain the impact of appropriate health care and safety of children
      • (F) discuss responsibilities of citizens, legislation, and public policies affecting children
    • (11) The student understands the skills necessary for career preparation. The student is expected to:
      • (C) practice human-relation skills
      • (D) demonstrate effective verbal, non-verbal, written, and electronic communication skills
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • recognize agencies designed to care for and protect children
    • summarize resources designed to care for and protect children
    • predict how the changing society will impact the health and welfare of children
    • analyze forms, causes, effects, prevention and treatment of child abuse
    • describe the benefits of health care and safety of children
    • analyze the responsibilities of citizens, legislation, and public policies affecting children
    • create a brochure for educators on child abuse awareness and ways they can help students
  • Rationale

    Script:

    Usually when we think of our childhood, we think of wonderful experiences, although that is not always the case for some students. In 2008, it was estimated that 772, 000 children were victims of child abuse or neglect and about 3.3 million children were referred to Child Protective Services (CPS).

    During this lesson, we will discuss child abuse, neglect, rights of children, and how it relates to education. Teachers are bound by law to protect their students’ welfare and well being. This lesson will give you knowledge and help enable you to become an empowered educator when it comes to protecting students.

    (Note to teacher: You may want to preface this lesson to your students due to the sensitive nature of the topic and emotions it may draw.)

  • Duration of Lesson

    Five 45 minute class periods.

  • Word Wall

    Child Protective Services (CPS): A government agency that investigates reports of abuse and neglect of children

    Emotional and verbal abuse: Rejecting children, blaming them, or constantly scolding them, particularly for problems beyond their control

    Mandated reporter: A person who is required by law to report maltreatment

    Neglect: Failing to provide for a child’s basic needs, including food, water, a place to live, love and attention

    Physical abuse: Intentionally causing an injury to a child

    Sexual abuse: Includes any inappropriate sexual behavior with a child, including touching or taking photographs

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for PowerPoint™ presentation
    • presenter/remote
    • computer lab with Internet access

    __

    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Anticipatory Set

    Prior to class:

    Arrange the students’ desks or tables into groups. Compile a list of statistics on child abuse, or print out the following statistics from http://www.childhelp.org/pages/statistics#stats-sources. Give one handout on the statistics to each group. Allow them to read over the statistics as they come into the classroom.
    __

    As class begins, distribute, Is This Abuse?, (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and have students answer the questions. After each student has completed the assignment, provide the answers. Explain to the class that you will go over each type of abuse later in the lesson in more detail.

    Ask the following questions:

    • Are there any statistics that surprise you? Explain which one.
    • How might it be difficult to teach a student who is a victim of child abuse?

    Distribute graphic organizer, KWHL Chart – Who’s Protecting Our Children?, (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and have students fill out the first three columns of the chart. Ask students to write down what they already know about the topic in the first column, what they want to learn about the topic in the second column and how they can locate more information about the topic in the third column. The last column will be completed during lesson closure.

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce objectives, terms, and definitions.

    Distribute handout, Notetaking – Who’s Protecting Our Children?, (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and introduce PowerPoint™, Who’s Protecting Our Children? (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Students will be expected to take notes while viewing the slide presentation.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • check for understanding
    • providing assistance with note-taking
    • providing extra time for oral response
    • frequent feedback

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Distribute handout, Who’s Protecting Our Children? Project (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Inform students that they will be creating an informative brochure about the topic “Child Abuse Awareness” for educators.

    Inform students that the assignment may be prepared individually or with a partner. Explain that information will be expected to be retrieved only from reliable sources. Provide students with project rubric and thoroughly review all components so that students understand how their projects will be accessed. Provide due date within three class periods.

    Students must present summative information in an oral presentation. Analyze rubrics for each oral presentation (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that students are aware of assessment procedures.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • check for understanding
    • providing extra time for oral response
    • frequent feedback
    • providing peer tutoring
    • reducing length of assignment
  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Students will work independently or with a partner researching and collecting data for their assignment. At the end of each class period, have each student or group give a brief status report on their assignment. Students will complete their assignments and begin presentations.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • check for understanding
    • providing extra time for oral response
    • frequent feedback
    • providing peer tutoring
    • reducing length of assignment
    • assisting student in gathering information
    • providing praise and encouragement
  • Lesson Closure

    Review objectives, terms, and definitions.

    Complete graphic organizer, KWHL Chart – Who’s Protecting Our Children?, (see All Lesson Attachments tab) to analyze what they have learned about child abuse.

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Student oral presentations will be assessed with appropriate rubric provided during Guided Practice.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • grading according to work done
    • providing praise and encouragement
  • References/Resources

    Textbooks:

    • Brisbane, H. (2010). The developing child. Columbus, OH: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
    • Morrison, G. (2012). Early childhood education today. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc.

    Websites:

    • Texas Department of Family and Protective Services
      Texas Child Protective Services (CPS)
      This website gives an overview of CPS and specific information about its responsibilities.
      http://www.dfps.state.tx.us/child_protection/
  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • word wall
    • draw visual representations of terms on word wall
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    Have the students write an article for the school newspaper, or the local paper, on child abuse awareness for April.

  • Family/Community Connection

    Invite members from the community, such as social workers, doctors, nurses, and teachers, to come and speak to the class about child abuse.

  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)

    http://texasfccla.org

    STAR Events:

    • Early Childhood Education – An individual event that recognizes participants who demonstrate their ability to use knowledge and skills gained from their enrollment in an occupational early childhood program.
    • Focus on Children – An individual or team event that recognizes participants who use Family and Consumer Sciences skills to plan and conduct a child development project that has a positive impact on children and the community.

    Texas Association of Future Educators (TAFE)

    http://tafeonline.org

    TAFE Events:

    • Project Visualize – It is a team event that recognizes participants who illustrate one of their chapter’s projects. The project must be from one of the areas of the TRAFLES. Contestants will thematically construct a tri-fold display (36” x 48”). Participants must prepare a display and an oral presentation introducing the display and summarizing the project.
    • Children’s Literature Competition – The book may be written and illustrated by one individual (the author/illustrator) or two individuals (an author and an illustrator) Assistance with illustrations using graphic design, computer animation or other artist assistance is permissible for the artwork of the book. The participant will prepare the original short story book format designed for a specific age audience (ages 3-5; ages 6-8; ages 9-11).
  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to lesson. For additional information on service learning see http://www.servicelearning.org.

    Possible idea:

    April is National Child Abuse Awareness Month. Students could create fliers and handouts to post around the school to bring awareness to the issue of child abuse. The materials could also include contact information for those desiring more information.

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