Who’s in Charge?

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Human Services

    Course : Interpersonal Studies

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (5) The student analyzes relationship development outside the family. The student is expected to:
      • (B) assess the influence of peers on the individual
      • (C) determine appropriate responses to authority figures
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • identify the positive and negative ways peers can influence others
    • demonstrate how to manage peer pressure by creating a skit or role play
    • understand appropriate responses to authority figures
  • Rationale

    Peers have a great impact on your life. Their impact can either be positive or negative. Understanding how to manage negative peer relationships is very important. We will discuss peer pressure and how to manage pressure situations. In addition we will explore appropriate responses to authority figures. Who are some authority figures in your life? Why are they important? What is their role in your life?

  • Duration of Lesson

    Three 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Acquaintances: People you know but who are not your close friends

    Authority Figure: Someone who is regarded as an authority by someone else

    Peers: Other people in a person’s age group

    Peer Pressure: The influences a person’s peers have on him or her

    Values: All the ideals and beliefs that a person considers important and that influence his or her decisions and actions

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for PowerPoint™ presentation
    • presenter/remote

    Materials:

    • markers
    • stapler
    • white printer paper (enough for students to have three sheets each for their 3-D organizer for notes)

    Supplies:

    • advertisements of alcohol products
    • baby simulator or baby doll
    • copies of old tests
    • pictures of drugs
    • shopping bags

    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Anticipatory Set

    Before class begins:

    Note to teacher: Preview YouTube™ video clip before class:

    • Peer Pressure: Positive or Negative?
      Exploration of how peer pressure can be negative (drugs, alcohol) or positive (acceptance)
      http://youtu.be/nMqAw5kxTO8

    Display as many items from the Materials or Specialized Equipment Needed section as you have available on a table in the front of the room.

    When class begins, show the YouTube™ clip, Peer Pressure: Positive or Negative?
    http://youtu.be/nMqAw5kxTO8

    After viewing the video, lead a brief discussion and ask the following questions:

    • What is positive peer pressure?
    • What is negative peer pressure?
    • How does peer pressure make you feel?
    • What are some ways to handle peer pressure?
    • Who is responsible for teaching young society how to handle peer pressure?
    • Can rules help deter negative peer pressure?
      —-

    Students will create a 3-D note organizer six panel overlap to take notes during the Direct Instruction section of this lesson. View the YouTube video for instructions:

    How to Make a Six Panel Overlap
    Students can use this manipulative as a sequential description of a topic or to show connection between a central idea, concept or process.
    http://youtu.be/UILX5mMhXyA

    Pass out the necessary supplies and assist the students in making their 3-D organizer.

    They will label the 3-D organizer as shown on the Three Page Note Organizer (see All Lesson Attachments tab).

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Review lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Inform students that they will be using their six panel overlap note organizer to take notes as they view the PowerPoint™ Who’s in Charge? (see All Lesson Attachments tab).

    Introduce PowerPoint™, Who’s in Charge? (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Have students take notes using their six panel overlap note organizer. Discuss slides in detail. Allow for questions and comments.

    YouTube™ videos included in the PowerPoint™:

    • Peer Pressure: You’re Better than That
      A student team from the University of Maryland developed this Public Service video about a persistent threat to people of all ages, peer pressure.
      http://youtu.be/OrCd3G8-kuI
    • The Peer Pressure Experiment
      Three teens faced with getting in the car with a teen they know has been drinking. Will they go along for the ride?
      http://youtu.be/RVOlwxvxhbY

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • print out PowerPoint™ notes so students can highlight as you teach
    • provide extra time for oral responses

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Have students complete What Will I Do? Living by My Code of Behavior activity (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and share their findings with the class during lesson closure.

    The students should work independently to answer Do I Have To…? Authority Figure Statements/Rules (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout. Have students share their findings with the class.

    Distribute and provide instructions for Authority Figure Statements/Rules (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout.

    After completing the activity, have students discuss their various statements/rules with their peers.
    Allow for questions and comments.

    Students will self assess this portion of the lesson by writing a personal reflection on what he or she learned from this activity.* See Authority Figure Statements/Rules Reflection (see All Lesson Attachments tab).

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • frequent student interactions
    • shorten the number of situations in the What Would You Do? (see All Lesson Attachments tab) activity.

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Divide students into subgroups of 3 or 4. Distribute handout Peer Pressure Topics (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and inform students of upcoming project -.creating a skit/role play depicting a peer pressure situation.

    Distribute Rubric for Peer Pressure Topics (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and explain each component so that students may fully understand how their skit will be assessed..

    Have groups decide on their skit topic. Monitor and assist class as each group creates a skit/role play depicting a peer pressure situation. Offer suggestions as needed. Allow ample time for preparation. When they have finished, provide time for each group to present. As a class, discuss the peer pressure skit outcomes.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • allowing students to work with a partner
    • checking for for understanding
    • extending assignment deadline
    • work with peer group

  • Lesson Closure

    Review lesson objectives, terms, and definitions.

    Students will share their responses to situations on the What Will I Do? Living by My Code of Behavior? (see All Lesson Attachments tab) activity.

    Additional questions for class discussion:

    • Why is it important to listen to authority figures?
    • Why is important to listen and follow your parent’s rules?
    • Why is it important to have rules in school? In the classroom?
    • When you become a parent, what rules are you going to enforce with your teenagers?

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Students will present Peer Pressure Topics skits/role plays.

    Skits will be assessed with appropriate rubric.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • allow students to record their presentations in advance and present the recording (audio or visual) if they are frightened by presenting to a crowd
    • another method would be to allow them to present to you first, then present to the class after you have assured them that they have a good product to share.
      Allow non-verbal students to create a visual presentation with PowerPoint or other media devise and present their thoughts and research in this manner
    • provide students with visual or auditory impairments a copy of the notes or a fill in the blank note sheet to follow along with instruction

  • References/Resources

    Images:

    • Microsoft Clip Art: Used with permission from Microsoft.

    Textbooks:

    • Harter, Ph.D., M., & Ryder, V. (2004). Contemporary living. (9th ed.). Tinley Park, Illinois: The Goodheart-Willcox Company. Inc.
    • Johnson, L. (2010). Strengthening family & self. (6th ed.). Tinley Park, Illinois: The Goodheart-Willcox Company. Inc.

    Websites:

    YouTube™:

    • How to Make a Six Panel Overlap
      Students can use this manipulative as a sequential description of a topic or to show connection between a central idea, concept or process.
      http://youtu.be/UILX5mMhXyA
    • Peer Pressure: Positive or Negative?
      Exploration of how peer pressure can be negative (drugs, alcohol) or positive (acceptance)
      http://youtu.be/nMqAw5kxTO8
    • Peer Pressure: You’re Better than That
      A student team from the University of Maryland developed this Public Service video about a persistent threat to people of all ages, peer pressure.
      http://youtu.be/OrCd3G8-kuI
    • The Peer Pressure Experiment
      Three teens faced with getting in the car with a teen they know has been drinking. Will they go along for the ride?
      http://youtu.be/RVOlwxvxhbY
  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Recommended Strategies

    Reading Strategies

    Current Events:
    Assign students to read about peer pressure topics. Information can be found in newspaper articles, magazines, journals and online print.
    Suggestions:

    Have students complete the Double Entry Journal (see All Lesson Attachments tab) to respond to the main topics to remember about peer pressure.

  • Quotes

    Nothing strengthens authority so much as silence.
    -Leonardo da Vinci

    Surround yourself with the best people you can find, delegate authority, and don’t interfere as long as the policy you’ve decided upon is being carried out.
    -Ronald Reagan

    I was bold in the pursuit of knowledge, never fearing to follow truth and reason to whatever results they led, and bearding every authority which stood in their way.
    -Thomas Jefferson

  • Multimedia/Visual Strategies

    PowerPoint™:

    • Who’s in Charge?
    • Presentation Notes for Who’s in Charge?

    Websites:

    • Information on Alcohol and Resisting Peer Pressure
      The Cool Spot was created for kids 11-13 years old by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA). The NIAAA is the leading U.S. agency supporting research into the causes, prevention, and treatment of alcohol problems.
      http://www.thecoolspot.gov/index.asp

    YouTube™:

    • How to Make a Six Panel Overlap
      Students can use this manipulative as a sequential description of a topic or to show connection between a central idea, concept or process.
      http://youtu.be/UILX5mMhXyA
    • Peer Pressure: Positive or Negative?
      Exploration of how peer pressure can be negative (drugs, alcohol) or positive (acceptance)
      http://youtu.be/nMqAw5kxTO8
    • Peer Pressure: You’re Better than That
      A student team from the University of Maryland developed this Public Service video about a persistent threat to people of all ages, peer pressure.
      http://youtu.be/OrCd3G8-kuI
    • The Peer Pressure Experiment
      Three teens faced with getting in the car with a teen they know has been drinking. Will they go along for the ride?
      http://youtu.be/RVOlwxvxhbY

    Files for downloading:

  • Graphic Organizers/Handout

    Graphic Organizer:

    • Three Page Note Organizer

    Handouts:

    • Authority Figure Statements/Rules Reflection
    • Do I Have To…? Authority Figure Statements/Rules
    • Double Entry Journal
    • Peer Pressure Topics
    • Rubric for Peer Pressure Topics
    • What Will I Do? Living by My Code of Behavior

    Files for downloading:

  • Writing Strategies

    Journal Entries:

    • Write about a situation where you might find yourself surrounded by negative peer pressure.
    • Write about a situation where you might find yourself surrounded by positive pressure.
    • I can handle negative peer pressure because _____________________________.

    Writing Strategy:

    • RAFT (Role/Audience/Format/Topic) writing strategy:
      Role: Friend
      Audience: Peers
      Format: Short Story
      Topic: Ways to handle peer pressure.
      You are to write a short story about a friend that is in a negative peer pressure situation and ways they could handle the situation.
  • Communication 90 Second Speech Topics

    Students can pick a situation from What Would You Do? (see All Lesson Attachments tab) activity and read it with their response to the question “What would you do?”

    • If I ran the school for a day, I would … because…
    • Why is it important to listen to authority figures?
  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    Invite a speaker, a law enforcement officer, or even the Principal to talk about why it is important to listen to authority and why rules are important.

  • Family/Community Connection

    Have students create a questionnaire they can use to interview their parents about rules and consequences when they were growing up and how they felt about them at the time. They can also ask their parents what they think of those rules now as an adult.

  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)

    http://www.texasfccla.org/

    • FCCLA Dynamic Leadership Project:

    Master the six essentials of leadership: model good character, solve problems, foster positive relationships, manage conflict, build teams, and educate peers. http://www.fcclainc.org/content/dynamic-leadership/

    The FCCLA Dynamic Leadership helps young people build leadership skills. It provides information, activities, and project ideas to help young people:

    • learn about leadership
    • recognize the lifelong benefits of leadership skills
    • practice leadership skills through FCCLA involvement
    • become strong leaders for families, careers, and communities.
  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to lesson.
    http://www.nylc.org/

    Example:

    • Stand-up to Bullying: Educate the school about bullying.
    • Change-Up Lunch Day: Encourage students during lunch to sit at different tables than they are used to and meet new friends.

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