Where Will We Go from Here?

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Education and Training

    Course : Instructional Practices in Education and Training

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (1) The student explores the teaching and training profession. The student is expected to:
      • (A) demonstrate an understanding of the historical foundations of education and training in the United States
    • (7) The student understands the relationship between school and society. The student is expected to:
      • (A) explain the relationship between school and society
      • (B) use school and community resources for professional growth
      • (C) use the support of family members, community members and business and industry to promote learning
    • (8) The student develops technology skills. The student is expected to:
      • (B) use technology applications appropriate for specific subject matter and student needs
      • (C) demonstrate skillful use of technology as a tool for instruction, evaluation and management
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • explain the connection between significant events in the history of the United States, the history of education and the history of their local community
    • articulate the value of schools to society and individuals
    • use technology to communicate the historical perspectives to other groups at school and in the community
  • Rationale

    Script:

    I’m sure there are days when you would like to stay at home and not come to school.

    Why do we have schools? Who started schools? Why does the law say you have to go to school?

    The purpose of this lesson is to give you a historically accurate overview of the history of education in the United States. You will be the next generation of educators. With the changes in our society and ever changing technology, you as a future leader in education must begin to think about answers to the question “Where will we go from here?”

    All of this valuable information will assist you as you pursue your career in education.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Five 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Common schools: Schools that were supported by the community where education was free for the students

    Dame schools: Schools taught by respected women who could read and write and who turned their homes into schools where parents paid to have their children taught

    Frontier schools: Usually one room schools where the teacher taught all ages and all subjects in one small room

    Grammar school: Early schools that were like modern high schools, originally for white boys only

    Kindergarten schools: Started for young children to be creative and expressive. They were like a “children’s garden.”

    Normal schools: Schools designed to train teachers

    Private schools: Schools where parents paid for their sons to attend class which emphasized religious beliefs

    Town school: Schools where all children in the town could learn

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for PowerPoint™ presentation
    • Internet

    Materials:

    • class set of TEKS for Instructional Practices in Education and Training
    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Anticipatory Set

    Before class begins:

    Locate online stopwatch to assist with this section of the lesson: http://www.online-stopwatch.com/
    __

    One-Minute Think Tank:

    • Organize students in small groups.
    • Ask each group a different question, example:
      • “What do you learn at school?”
      • “How would life be different if there were no schools?”

    One student from each group will record responses while others have one minute to “think.”

    Use timer and stop after one minute so groups can report their answers to the class.

    Provide each student with a copy of the TEKS for this course.

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Prepare students to take notes on slide presentation. Distribute History of Education Word Web (see All Lessons Attachment tab).

    Introduce Where Will We go from Here? PowerPoint™ (see All Lessons Attachment tab). Give a brief summary of education milestones in each century of American history from 1600 to the present. Detailed notes are provided with each slide.

    The presentation is meant to be interactive, as it requires the students to identify historical connections. If any students are taking a U.S. history course, they can make reference to their textbook. Allow for questions and discussion.

    Check for understanding.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • providing copy of slide presentation
    • providing copy of vocabulary words

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Human Time Line:

    Divide students into two groups: Half will work on U.S. history and the other half will focus on education.
    Each student within the group will write one milestone for either U.S. history or education on an index card (or paper.) If possible, provide each group with different colored cards/paper or give a colored marker to differentiate each category. The milestones should include an event and the century in which it occurred or the specific date. Students can use their notes, textbooks or other research tools.

    When the cards are complete, students will make a human time line by holding their cards in the correct chronological order. The cards can also be placed in order and attached to the wall as a visual aid.

    Distribute The History of Education Time Line, (see All Lessons Attachments tab).

    Students will fill in the highlight for each box on the timeline.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • pairing students with peer tutors
    • writing the information on the cards for students

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce Where Will We Go From Here? Project. The goal is to create a product that will promote public awareness of the current U.S. public school system and allow students to research and formulate their personal vision and answer the question “Where will we go from here?” Students may work individually or in groups and may select a project media such as a video, brochure,web page or public service announcement.

    Review components of Where Will We Go From Here? Project Assessment Rubric.

    Allow time for completion of Project. Provide guidance as needed.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • partially filling in sections of assignment
    • using vocabulary flash cards to help students recall types of schools

  • Lesson Closure

    Ask students to look at the copy of the TEKS for Instructional Practices in Education and Training they were given on day one of the lesson. Review the TEKS covered in the lesson activities. Review lesson terms, definitions and lesson objectives.

    Have students respond in writing to the following:
    “Children are messages to a time we will never see.”
    What messages about education will you take to future generations?

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Assessment 1
    Provide students with copies of The History of Education Time Line. (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Students will fill in at least one education and one US history milestone for each century. Make sure to include when the first school was built in their community on the timeline.

    Assessment 2
    Evaluate responses to reading assignments, journal entries and other oral and written assignments.

    Assessment 3
    Students will present their Where Will We Go From Here project to the class. Allow for question. Use Project Assessment Rubric to evaluate .

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • using notes to complete assignments
    • working in groups

  • References/Resources

    Images:

    • Microsoft Clip Art: Used with permission from Microsoft.
    • Photos obtained through a license with Shutterstock.com.

    Textbooks:

    • Bredekamp, Sue.  Effective practices in early childhood education. Pearson, 2011.
    • Herr, Judy. Working with young children. Goodheart-Wilcox. 1998.
    • The Curriculum Center for Family and Consumer Sciences Texas Tech University. Putting It All Together: Education and Training. comp. 1st ed. Boston: Pearson Learning Solutions, 2010. Print.

    Websites:

    • Collaborize Classroom
      A free collaborative education platform for students and teachers. Get 100% student participation. Save on monthly printing costs. Reduce grading time by up to two hours a week. Receive detailed participation reports.
      http://www.wecollaborize.com/classroom.html
    • Quizlet
      The best way to study languages, vocabulary, or almost anything (flashcards). It’s fun, it’s free, and you can share with friends!
      http://www.quizlet.com
    • Service Learning Texas
      Information on service learning. Helping youth engage in meaningful service that enriches learning and strengthens communities.
      http://www.servicelearningtexas.org

    YouTube™:

    • Horace Mann – The Father Of American Education
      This is a video project I made for my Human Growth and Development Class at Dakota State University in Madison, South Dakota.
      http://youtu.be/pAnTmplQ_tw
  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • word wall
    • vocabulary flash cards
    • use Graphic Organizer #1“History of Education Word Web”. Timeline cards can be made by students working in groups. Peer tutors can assist using information from the slide show, notes or textbooks.
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Recommended Strategies

    Reading Strategies

    • A current issue in education is the debate between phasing out NCLB (No Child Left Behind) to reauthorize The Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), legislation from the 1960’s. The following web site has many pdf summaries about this topic. Students may choose one to read and summarize for a short written paper or to orally report to the class.
      http://www2.ed.gov/policy/elsec/leg/blueprint/index.html
    • This activity demonstrates the relevancy of this TEK and allows students to see the value of knowing history and how it often repeats itself.
  • Quotes

    Education is not preparation for life, education is life itself.
    -John Dewey

    Children are messages to a time we will never see.
    -Neil Postman

    Education is the true foundation of liberty.
    -James Madison

  • Multimedia/Visual Strategies

    PowerPoint™:

    • Where Will We Go From Here?
    • Presentation Notes for Where Will We Go from Here?
    • Free iPad App:
    • Infographic:
      • A Brief History of Online Learning (Infographic)
        This infographic provides a brief visual history of online learning. It shows the different roles that technology has played in the evolution of higher ed, provides the cultural context for advances made in distance learning, and highlights the rapid adoption of online courses.
        http://www.straighterline.com/blog/brief-history-online-learning-infographic/
    • TedTalk:
      • Pearl Arredondo: My story, from gangland daughter to star teacher
        Pearl Arredondo grew up in East Los Angeles, the daughter of a high-ranking gang member who was in and out of jail. Many teachers wrote her off as having a problem with authority. Now a teacher herself, she’s creating a different kind of school and telling students her story so that they know its okay if sometimes homework isn’t the first thing on their minds.
        https://www.ted.com/talks/pearl_arredondo_my_story_from_gangland_daughter_to_star_teacher

    YouTube™:

    • Horace Mann-The Father of American Education
      Also an example of student work using technology for a class project. This is an excellent video about the life of Horace Mann.
      http://youtu.be/pAnTmplQ_tw

    Files for downloading:

  • Graphic Organizers/Handout

    Graphic Organizers:

    • History of Education: Timeline
    • The History of Education Time: Word Wall

    Handout:

    • Where Will We Go From Here Rubric

    Files for downloading:

  • Writing Strategies

    Journal Entries:

    • If I could not read or write, I would . . .
    • “Children are messages to a time we will never see,” by Neil Postman means . . .
    • If I could go back to the past, I would like to live during what time in history?
    • My school is effective because…
    • A classroom one hundred years from now might look like…

    Writing Strategies:

    Additional writing strategies such as note taking, letter writing, summarizing, paraphrasing, RAFT (Role, Audience, Format and Topic), or peer review of written assignment may be included.

  • Communication 90 Second Speech Topics

    Interpret one of the quotes below:

    • STAAR tests are important because . . .
    • The most interesting part of the history of education is…
  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    • Write a skit or play about the history of education in the United States or the local area. Students can perform the skit for young children or make a video of their play to distribute to elementary classes.
    • Students can use technology to develop a video or brochure to share knowledge about the history of education. Videos may be put on YouTube™, linked to the school web site, and/or used to make presentations in the community.

    TEDx Talk:

    TED is a nonprofit organization devoted to spreading ideas, usually in the form of short, powerful talks (18 minutes or less).

    TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event.

    TED-Ed’s commitment to creating lessons worth sharing is an extension of TED’s mission of spreading great ideas. This allows users to take any useful educational video, not just TED’s, and easily create a customized lesson around the video.

    The video below is related to the lesson. Allow students to view the video and lead a discussion concerning the TED Talk.

    Pearl Arredondo: My story, from gangland daughter to star teacher
    Pearl Arredondo grew up in East Los Angeles, the daughter of a high-ranking gang member who was in and out of jail. Many teachers wrote her off as having a problem with authority. Now a teacher herself, she’s creating a different kind of school and telling students her story so that they know its okay if sometimes homework isn’t the first thing on their minds.
    https://www.ted.com/talks/pearl_arredondo_my_story_from_gangland_daughter_to_star_teacher

  • Family/Community Connection

    • Identify and interview people from the community who have knowledge about the history of schools in the local area. Museum curators or librarians can help students identify local historians.
    • Students may also interview parents or grandparents about their school memories.
  • CTSO connection

    Texas Association of Future Educators (TAFE)

    http://tafeonline.org/

    • Lesson Planning and Delivery Competition – This competition is an individual event where future educators will plan, prepare and deliver a lesson of their choosing to an actual classroom of students. Self-reflection following the lesson is an essential component of this competition as future educators begin the practice of honing their own teaching skills. Participants will prepare a lesson plan and a 10 minute video teaching the lesson to a class. The lesson can focus either on CTE, Humanities or STEM.
  • Service Learning Projects

    Ideally, true service learning is developed with student voice about concerns and needs. As the students are learning and researching about this topic, ask them to list potential service learning ideas.
    Using the LEADERS Model from http://www.servicelearningtexas.org, activities may include:

    • Develop a school web site about the history of education in the local area
    • Work with the local museum or library to develop displays at the museum, schools, or local businesses about local education history