Foodservice Venues (revised)

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Hospitality and Tourism

    Course : Principles of Hospitality and Tourism

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (1) The student applies academic skills for the hospitality and tourism industry. The student is expected to:
      • (A) write effectively using standard English and correct grammar
    • (2) The student uses verbal and nonverbal communication to provide a positive experience for guests and employees. The student is expected to:
      • (A) develop and analyze formal and informal presentations
    • (4) The student develops principles in time management, decision making and prioritizing. The student is expected:
      • (A) apply effective practices for managing time and energy
    • (7) The student demonstrates leadership, citizenship, and teamwork skills required for success. The student is expected to:
      • (A) develop team-building skills
      • (B) develop decision-making and problem-solving skills
    • (10) The student demonstrates research skills applicable to the hospitality and tourism industry. The student is expected to:
      • (A) develop technical vocabulary to enhance customer service
      • (C) examine elements of a dining experience expected to satisfy guests at varied facilities such as a boardwalk vendor, cruise ship, chain restaurant, and five-star dining facility
    • (11) The student understands the importance of customer service. The student is expected to:
      • (D) examine different types of food service
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • identify the types of foodservice venues
    • recognize commercial and noncommercial foodservice venues
    • define restaurant elements and show examples of each
    • recognize various foodservice venues in their community by category
    • design and create a shoebox restaurant analyzing the elements of various foodservice categories
  • Rationale

    Script:

    (Revised 6/23/2015) Did you know there are different categories of restaurants? There are so many types of restaurants to choose from. Which would you choose? What draws you to eat there? Is it just the food? Is it the ambiance? The location? These are just a few of the elements of a restaurant. Let’s find out what it takes to design and create a restaurant and how it might help you in your career.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Five 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Catering: The job of organizing the food and drinks for an event such as a party or meeting

    Commercial foodservice: Consists of food and beverage businesses that compete for customers

    Fine-dining restaurant: Emphasizes the highest quality in service, ingredients, and atmosphere

    Foodservice: The industry related to making, transporting or selling prepared foods to restaurants, hospitals, schools and lodging establishments

    Full-service restaurant: A restaurant in which customers are seated at a table, give their orders to a server, and are served their food at the table

    Noncommercial foodservice: An operation that is subsidized or supported by a host company or organization

    Quick-service: Provides customers with convenience, speed, and basic service at low prices

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for PowerPoint™ presentation
    • computers with Internet access (be sure to follow district guidelines)
    • light projector (Elmo)

    Materials

    • magazines (various)
    • markers
    • restaurant menus (various)

    Supplies:

    • for restaurant elements project
      • shoeboxes (empty, various sizes)
        • butcher paper
        • construction paper
        • fabric scraps
        • glue
        • scissors
        • scotch tape

    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)

  • Anticipatory Set

    Before class begins:

    Note: Before beginning this lesson, ask coworkers and students to save empty shoeboxes for this project.

    Display as many items from the Materials or Specialized Equipment Needed tab as you have available on a table in front of the room so that students may view as they enter.

    Distribute the handout Anticipation Guide: Foodservice Venues (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and instruct students to read the statements carefully and place a check mark on the left column if they think it is true.

    Lead a discussion on the types of foodservice restaurants available in your community.

    After the lesson, this handout will be revisited in the Lesson Closure section to check for knowledge of the lesson.

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Distribute a handout or graphic organizer from the Instructional Strategies drop down menu in Classroom Essentials or ask students to take notes in their journal books or on their own paper.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/Categorizing-Notes.pdf
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/Note-Taking.pdf

    Introduce the PowerPoint™ Foodservice Venues (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Students will be expected to take notes while viewing the slide presentation. Allow time for classroom discussion.

    Discuss the types of foodservice venues available.

    View the video from the National Restaurant Association:

    • America’s Restaurants — Industry of Opportunity
      As the second largest private-sector employer in the country, America’s restaurants are an economic force, but that statistic doesn’t fully tell the story of the millions of individuals who are living the American Dream by working in our industry. This video captures a few poignant stories that help tell the ‘Industry of Opportunity’ story.
      http://youtu.be/PF0gb3eny70

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • providing slide presentation notes
    • check for understanding

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Divide the class into subgroups of three or four students.

    Distribute graphic organizer, Foodservice Venues in My Community (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and instruct students to brainstorm the names of food venues in their community for each of the industry categories.

    Allow time for discussion.

    Distribute the graphic organizer Restaurant Elements (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and begin a discussion on how restaurants set themselves apart.

    Place the Restaurant Elements (Key) (see All Lesson Attachments tab) on a light projector and allow students to take notes as you discuss each element and give examples.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • provide key for easier note-taking
    • extended time for assignment

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Divide the class into subgroups of three or four or keep the same groups from the Guided Practice section.

    Read the following scenario:

    You work for a design company and your team has been assigned the task of designing a new restaurant concept for a boardwalk vendor, chain restaurant, cruise ship or a five-star restaurant to compete for a “Best of Show” category at a conference. What will your team create?

    Distribute the handout Restaurant Elements Shoebox Project (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and explain the project. Students may choose any size shoe box to work with.

    Distribute the graphic organizer Restaurant Shoebox Plan (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and allow the teams to work together to construct the restaurant.

    Distribute the Rubric for Restaurant Elements Shoebox Project (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that students will understand what is expected.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • checking for understanding
    • frequent feedback
    • peer grouping

  • Lesson Closure

    Review lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Re-distribute the handout Anticipation Guide: Foodservice Venues from the Anticipatory Set.

    Reread each statement and place a check mark by the statements you KNOW are true. Provide information that PROVES other statements are not true. You may use the back of this sheet if additional space is needed.

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Presentations will be assessed with appropriate rubric.

    The team with the highest scores and best design project will receive a Certificate of Excellence (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Students may add this to their portfolio.

    Note to teacher: Display the projects in the library where other students may see the restaurant shoeboxes. Take photos to post on your website or on a bulletin board outside your classroom.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • encouraging student participation in discussion
    • extended time for oral answers

  • References/Resources

    Images:

    • Shutterstock™ images. Photos obtained with subscription.

    Textbook:

    • Reynolds, J. S. & Chase, D. M. (2014). Hospitality Services. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox.

    YouTube™:

    • America’s Restaurants — Industry of Opportunity
      As the second largest private-sector employer in the country, America’s restaurants are an economic force, but that statistic doesn’t fully tell the story of the millions of individuals who are living the American Dream by working in our industry. This video captures a few poignant stories that help tell the ‘Industry of Opportunity’ story.
      http://youtu.be/PF0gb3eny70
  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • word wall
    • draw visual representations of terms on word wall
    • add terms and definitions to personal dictionary
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Recommended Strategies

    Reading Strategies

    Other articles pertaining to this lesson that students may read include:

    • Restaurant Décor Ideas
      The right restaurant décor can positively impact your bottom line by attracting repeat customers who feel at home in your establishment. When choosing your restaurant’s décor keep your ideal customers in mind and create a soothing atmosphere where they can relax, enjoy and unwind from the day.
      http://www.ehow.com/way_5267306_restaurant-decor-ideas.html
    • Restaurant Theme Ideas
      While your menu and food quality will be key factors in the success of your new restaurant, there are other factors you should consider. One of those is the theme of your restaurant—-often a crucial decision when opening your own establishment. It is often wise to try and fill a niche in your area, one you think will appeal to customers.
      http://www.ehow.com/list_6942364_restaurant-theme-ideas.html
    • Unique Restaurant Ideas and Concepts
      Unusual restaurants are popular businesses to start and to frequent, because they offer something different. Certain restaurant categories, like Italian family restaurants, are widespread and well-established, and perhaps present less risk. However, the reward of creating an exotic restaurant is that it challenges your creativity, and gives your customers not just a meal — but an experience.
      http://www.ehow.com/info_8365369_unique-restaurant-ideas-concepts.html

    Reading Strategy
    Encourage students to “visualize” as they read. Many students are visual learners and will benefit from making sketches or diagrams on scrap paper as they read. Providing students with graphic organizers to help them organize their thoughts is also helpful.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/rgroup/instructional-strategies/page/4/

  • Quotes

    To eat well, I always disagree with critics who say that all restaurants should be fine dining. You can get a Michelin star if you serve the best hamburger in the world.
    -David Chang

    Get to know the chef and you will start to enjoy dining out more.
    -John Waters

    In the restaurant business, there’s the concept of pivot. Pivot to the stove, pivot to the refrigerator.
    -Tom Douglas

    When I first decided to open a restaurant, I was turned down by several banks. It was the late 80’s and many restaurants were failing. I refused to give up because I knew I had a good concept.
    -Emeril Lagasse

    I had talked for years about doing a restaurant with Rocky Dudum, who’s been my friend since I first came to San Francisco. Then Rocky’s son, Jeff, said he wanted to design it, so he traveled around the country to sports restaurants like Mickey Mantle’s and Michael Jordan’s, and he came up with a great concept.
    -Willie McCovey

  • Multimedia/Visual Strategies

    PowerPoint™:

    • Foodservice Venues
    • Presentation Notes – Foodservice Venues

    Technology

    • Infographics:
      • 11 Amazing Restaurant Industry Statistics Who doesn’t like to go out to eat every once and awhile? Even households that have the lowest levels of income still make an effort to enjoy a night out at a restaurant when they can make it happen financially.
        http://brandongaille.com/11-restaurant-industry-statistics/
    • TED Talks:
      • The Convergence of Casual and Fine
        In the summer of 2004, USHG launched Shake Shack, a food kiosk in Madison Square Park, serving Chicago-style hot dogs, burgers, frozen custard and more- based on Danny’s childhood love of these Midwestern treats. Since then, new locations have opened in Manhattan’s Upper West Side, Theater District, the Upper East Side, Battery Park City, and Downtown Brooklyn, along with Miami Beach, Citi Field, Saratoga Race Course, Washington D.C., and Westport, CT.
        http://www.tedxmanhattan.org/danny-meyer-the-convergence-of-casual-and-fine/

    Files for downloading:

  • Graphic Organizers/Handout

    Graphic Organizer:

    • Foodservice Venues in my Community
    • Restaurant Elements
    • Restaurant Elements (Key)
    • Restaurant Elements Plan

    Handouts:

    • Anticipation Guide: Foodservice Venues
    • Anticipation Guide: Foodservice Venues (Key)
    • Certificate of Excellence
    • Restaurant Elements Project
    • Rubric for Restaurant Elements Project

    Files for downloading:

  • Writing Strategies

    Journal Entries:

    • My favorite restaurant to eat at is ___________ because …
    • I enjoy the atmosphere at ___________ because …
    • If I were to own a restaurant I would choose the theme of __________ because …
    • I enjoy visiting with friends at the local casual restaurant because …
    • The best buffet restaurant in town is ____________ because …

    Writing Strategies:

    • RAFT Writing Strategy:
      • Role – entrepreneur
      • Audience – bank loan officer
      • Topic – small business loan
      • Format – letter

    Write a letter to the bank loan officer requesting a small business loan to open a small cafe in your community.

  • Communication 90 Second Speech Topics

    • Three things about my favorite restaurant are …
    • One foodservice establishment that I think is fascinating is …
  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    Students may design a project board incorporating all of the elements they would like to see in a restaurant they would like to own.

    Infographics:

    Infographics are graphic visual representations of information, data or knowledge intended to present complex information quickly and clearly.

    The infographic below is related to this lesson. Allow students to view the image on a projector and lead a discussion concerning the information provided.

    • 11 Amazing Restaurant Industry Statistics
      Who doesn’t like to go out to eat every once and awhile? Even households that have the lowest levels of income still make an effort to enjoy a night out at a restaurant when they can make it happen financially.
      http://brandongaille.com/11-restaurant-industry-statistics/

    TED Talk:

    TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event.

    The video below is related to this lesson. Allow students to view the video and lead a discussion concerning the TED Talk.

    • The Convergence of Casual and Fine
      In the summer of 2004, USHG launched Shake Shack, a food kiosk in Madison Square Park, serving Chicago-style hot dogs, burgers, frozen custard and more- based on Danny’s childhood love of these Midwestern treats. Since then, new locations have opened in Manhattan’s Upper West Side, Theater District, the Upper East Side, Battery Park City, and Downtown Brooklyn, along with Miami Beach, Citi Field, Saratoga Race Course, Washington D.C., and Westport, CT.
      http://www.tedxmanhattan.org/danny-meyer-the-convergence-of-casual-and-fine/
  • Family/Community Connection

    Invite small foodservice business owners to speak to the class about owning a business.

  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)

    http://www.texasfccla.org

    • Entrepreneurship
      An individual or team event – recognizes participants who develop a plan for a small business using Family and Consumer Sciences skills and sound business practices. The business must relate to an area of Family and Consumer Sciences education or related occupations.
    • Hospitality, Tourism, and Recreation
      An individual or team event, recognizes participants who demonstrate their knowledge of the hospitality, tourism, and recreation industries and ability to translate their knowledge into a hypothetical or real business. Project must relate to culinary, lodging, recreation, tourism or event coordination.
  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to this lesson.
    www.ysa.org

    Possible idea:
    Students may plan a project to design and decorate the local food pantry to make it more inviting for the clients.

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