Understanding Family Dynamics

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Human Services

    Course : Interpersonal Studies

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (7) The student determines methods that promote an effective family unit. The student is expected to:
      • (B) identify the function of individuals within the family
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • recognize truths and roles which occur in the family
    • determine how family dynamics impacts our lives
  • Rationale

    Script:

    What are the functions of individuals within the family? What are family dynamics? How do they influence the family unit? We relate and interact with our family members everyday. While each family system and dynamics are unique, there are some common threads. Understanding the impact of family dynamics on a young person’s self-identity may help caregivers and Counseling and Mental Health counselors understand the dynamism behind a young person’s existing needs.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Two 45 minute class lessons

  • Word Wall

    Buffering: Balancing of roles so that the negative aspects of one role can be offset by the positive aspects of another role

    Family Dynamics: They are the patterns of relating, or interactions, between family members

    Life Passage: A predictable developmental stage in a person’s life

    Marker Event: A significant event that marks real change in one’s life

    Multiplicity: Having several different roles and responsibilities

    Roles: The responsibilities we assume and how we portray them individually and in the family

    Scapegoating: The person who gets blamed for the problem is the scapegoat

    Stereotype: Categorizing all into one type

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for PowerPoint™ presentation

    Supplies:

    • crayons
    • markers
    • poster board
    • rulers
    • scissors

    Technology:

    • access to PowerPoint™

    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Anticipatory Set

    Before class begins:

    Write the following words on the board or overhead projector:

    • athlete
    • beauty queen
    • brain
    • breadwinner
    • child
    • helper
    • heroine
    • manager
    • peace-keeper
    • placater
    • rebel
    • rescuer
    • scapegoat
    • student
    • victim

    As students come in and class begins, ask them:

    • Do any of these words represent them in their family?
    • Do some of these words describe their sisters or brothers?

    Allow time for discussion.

    Distribute graphic organizer KWL Chart- Family Dynamics (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and have the students complete the first two columns of the chart. Ask the students to write down what they already know about roles in the family such as: mother, child, sister, or grandparent in the “know” section. Students should also write the words that they understand the meaning of. In the “want to know” section, have them write down the words from the board that they do not know the meaning of. Students complete the graphic organizer during lesson closure.

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Review lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Distribute handout Double-Entry Journal Notes (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Students will be expected to take notes while viewing the slide presentation. Teacher to determine the notes which will be recorded by students.

    Introduce PowerPoint™ Understanding Family Dynamics (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and begin the discussion with students. Allow for questions and answers to check for understanding.

    YouTube™ videos included in the PowerPoint™:

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include but are not limited to:

    • checking for understanding
    • providing assistance with note taking
    • allowing extra time
  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Ask the students to think about their own family. What are the roles for each family member?

    Distribute What is Your Role? (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout. Have the students list each family member and their given roles, acquired roles and character roles, as presented in the PowerPoint™ Understanding Family Dynamics.

    After listing roles of family members, students will work collaboratively in teams of two to determine the characteristics of roles, looking for both similarities and differences from each family.

    Allow time for student questions and class discussion after completing the activity.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • extra time
    • frequent feedback
    • student praise
  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Distribute Family Roles Tree (see All Lesson Attachments tab) assignment. Students will work individually and the teacher may determine how much detail students need to add to the tree. Teacher will take assignment for a daily grade.

    Students will present their completed assignment during Summative/End of Lesson Assessment.

    Individual Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • extra time
    • frequent feedback
    • student praise
  • Lesson Closure

    Review lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Students will complete the last column of the KWL Chart-Family Dynamics graphic organizer.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed.
    Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • encourage participation
    • frequent feedback
    • praise often
  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Students will present their “Family Roles Tree”. Teachers may grade on completion, following directions, detail and speaking presentation.

    Reflection: Using the information gathered in Understanding Family Dynamics, students will write a one page summary analyzing their information, noted family roles and family dynamics. Students will reflect on how they plan to use this activity and information now and in the future. The reflection and handouts will be submitted for assessment.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • encourage participation
    • frequent feedback
    • praise often
  • References/Resources

    Images:

    • Microsoft Clip Art: Used with permission from Microsoft.

    Textbook:

    • Johnson, L. (2004). _Strengthening family & self_. (3rd ed.). Tinley Park: The Goodheart-Willcox Company, Inc.

    Websites:

    • Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)
      Website containing curricular ideas and information related to family, career and community.
      http://www.texasfccla.org
    • Public Broadcasting Service (PBS)
      Website with links to television, articles and information on various curricular subjects of public interest.
      http://www.pbs.org

    YouTube™:

  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • word wall
    • journal entries
    • additional time to prepare presentation of Family Roles Tree
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Recommended Strategies

    Reading Strategies

    Current Events:
    Assign students to read about the function of individuals within the family. Information can be found in newspaper articles, magazines, journals, and online print.
    Suggestions:

    • Connect the article message to experiences in your own family.
    • Draw conclusions from the reading about the importance of family dinner time.
  • Quotes

    Some things you do because you want to. Some things you do because of the needs of others in your family.
    -Anonymous Author from RealLivePreacher.com weblog

    Other things may change, but we start and end with family.
    -Anthony Brandt

  • Multimedia/Visual Strategies

    PowerPoint™:

    • Understanding Family Dynamics
    • Presentation Notes for Understanding Family Dynamics

    Technology:

    • Free iPad App:
    **
    • Infographic:
    **
    • Tedx Talk:
      • Kare Anderson: Be an opportunity maker
        We all want to use our talents to create something meaningful with our lives. But how to get started? (And … what if you’re shy?) Writer Kare Anderson shares her own story of chronic shyness, and how she opened up her world by helping other people use their own talents and passions.
        http://www.ted.com/talks/kare_anderson_be_an_opportunity_maker

    YouTube™:

  • Graphic Organizers/Handout

    Graphic Organizer:

    • KWL Chart- Family Dynamics

    Handouts:

    • Double-Entry Journal Notes
    • Family Roles Tree
    • Filmstrip Sequencing Activity
    • What is Your Role?
  • Writing Strategies

    Journal Entries:

    • Being part of a family includes having responsibilities such as…
    • One of the character roles that I do not like being labeled as, is…

    Writing Strategy:

    Distribute Filmstrip Sequencing Activity (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout.

    Develop a comic strip about a comedic incident which occurred in your family depicting specific family roles. Some of the most famous comics are about every day kind of things!
    Here are some basic steps to follow to make your own comic strip.
    1. Write the script. This helps you know how many panels you need. The number of panels you need depend on what you want to say.
    2. Draw a rough draft of the whole comic strip. Just sketch in stick figures. This will help you know what should go in each panel.
    3. Redraw the comic strip on the final paper, but do it very lightly so you can erase. Lightly draw in the balloons around the words so you’ll know how much space you’ll need.
    4. Once everything is lightly sketched how you want it, go back and make the marks dark so you can see them.
    5. Color your comic strip and share with classmates. Display comic strips in the classroom.

  • Communication 90 Second Speech Topics

    Ask students to report verbally about the current lesson and its application to their lives.

    • How, in your opinion, does stereotyping roles affect people negatively?
    • Discuss how a marker event in your life changed you for the better.
    • The expectations I have for my personal roles in the future are…..
  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    Read the following article and make a list of the Steps to Step-Family Success. This PBS article by Gloria Lintermans, takes readers through the myths of how step-families blend and how to keep step-families on the right track. Sometimes it’s not that easy.

    Public Broadcasting Service (PBS)
    www.pbs.org
    http://www.pbs.org/parents/experts/archive/2011/10/steps-to-stepfamily-success.html

    TED Talks:

    TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks videos and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event.

    The video below is related to this lesson. Allow students to view the video, and lead a discussion concerning the TED Talk.

    • Kare Anderson: Be an opportunity maker
      We all want to use our talents to create something meaningful with our lives. But how to get started? (And … what if you’re shy?) Writer Kare Anderson shares her own story of chronic shyness, and how she opened up her world by helping other people use their own talents and passions.
      http://www.ted.com/talks/kare_anderson_be_an_opportunity_maker
  • Family/Community Connection

    • Have the students investigate community groups, services or organizations that help strengthen families. Example: (MOPS) Mothers’ of Preschoolers, church outreach programs, and local charities. Ask students to create a list of these agencies and what services they provide.
    • Interview grandparents to gain an insight to how families and relationships have changed.
    • Compile a list titled “What Makes a Family Strong” and ask students to correlate the list to their own family. How is it different? How is it similar?
  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)
    http://texasfccla.org

    STAR Events:

    FCCLA Family First Project – http://www.fcclainc.org/content/families-first/

    The FCCLA Families First is a national peer education program through which youth gain a better understanding of how families work and learn skills to become strong family members. Its goals are to: help youth become strong family members and leaders for today and tomorrow and strengthen the family as the basic unit of society. To help members focus their projects, Families First offers five units. Members may complete projects in one or several units. There is no particular order to them; although, “Families Today” might be a good place to start. It covers topics that provide a general overview of families and related issues:
    Families Today: Understand and celebrate families
    You-Me-Us: Strengthen family relationships
    Meet the Challenge: Overcome obstacles together
    Balancing Family and Career: Manage multiple responsibilities
    Parent Practice: Learn to nurture children

  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to lesson.
    http://www.nylc.org/

    Possible idea:
    Organize a group meeting to discuss the struggles and successes of making a blended family work. Perhaps, some of the tips discussed can help others through a challenging time in their lives.

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