Types of Lodging Properties

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Hospitality and Tourism

    Course : Hotel Management

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (1) The student gains academic knowledge and skills required to pursue the full range of career and postsecondary education opportunities within the hotel industry. The student is expected to:
      • (A) organize oral and written information
    • (2) The student uses verbal and nonverbal communication skills to create, express, and interpret information for providing a positive experience for guests and employees. The student is expected to:
      • (A) develop, deliver and critique presentations
      • (G) follow directions and procedures independently
    • (5) The student develops principles in time management, decision making, effective communication, and prioritizing. The student is expected to:
      • (A) apply effective practices for managing time and energy
      • (C) analyze various steps in the decision-making process
    • (7) The student understands roles within teams, work units, departments, organizations, and the larger environment of the hotel industry. The student is expected to:
      • (C) compare and contrast full service hotels and limited service properties
    • (8) The student uses information technology tools specific to hotel management to access, manage, integrate, and create information. The student is expected to:
      • (E) evaluate Internet resources for industry information
    • (12) The student understands the knowledge and skills required for careers in the hotel management industry. The student is expected to:
      • (A) develop job-specific technical vocabulary
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • compare and contrast full service hotels and limited service properties
    • develop job-specific technical vocabulary
    • develop, deliver and critique presentations
  • Rationale

    Script:

    We are about to learn the differences between the types of lodging properties so that you will be able to identify the career opportunities that most interest you in the industry. Knowing the differences in the hotel properties will also enable you to have a better understanding of the hotel industry and how the businesses achieve success.
    Understanding the different lodging properties will enable you to have intelligent conversation with hospitality industry professionals.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Five 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Amenity: An extra item or service that adds to a travelers comfort or convenience

    Budget Hotels: Lowest rates and least service properties

    Concierge: Hotel staff member who helps guests make arrangements such as dinner reservations; also advises guests on what to do and see in the area

    Conference Center: A property where 60% or more of the occupancy is generated by conferences

    Continental Breakfast: Consists of breakfast foods that do not need to be cooked and can be served in a building that does not have a kitchen

    Convention: A large meeting usually sponsored by a group for its members

    Convention Center: A large building designed to hold large meetings, conventions and trade shows; usually no sleeping rooms. Developed by the city in which it is located

    Dormitory: A large sleeping room filled with beds for many guests

    Double-Occupancy: A guest room for two or more people

    Exhibit Hall: The space where a trade show is held

    Extended Stay guest: Guests that stay 5-29 days in the property

    Hostel: An inexpensive place to stay where sleeping rooms, bathrooms and kitchen facilities are shared

    Leisure Travel: Travel done for rest and relaxation; also called pleasure travel

    Limited Service Property: A smaller property that provides fewer services and is less expensive than a full-service hotel

    Long Stay guest: Guests that stay 30 or more days on the property

    Luxury Hotel: Provides the highest level of amenities, service, room furnishings, public spaces and technology

    Motels: The first limited-service hotels

    Resort Hotel: A place that caters to a leisure traveler and provides entertainment, recreation, and relaxation

    Senior Housing: Provides places to live for people over 55

    Suite: Hotel accommodation that consists of more than one room

    Time-Share: The owner owns the right to use the unit for a specific length of time per year

    Trade Show: An exhibit where people sell goods and services

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • Computer with projector for PowerPoint ™ presentation

    Materials:

    • flip chart paper or poster boards
    • markers /dry erase markers
    • copies of handouts (see Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Anticipatory Set

    Before class begins:

    Arrange several sets of different size suitcases at the front of the room so that students may see them when they enter.

    Divide the class into subgroups of three. Provide each group with a poster board and markers. Instruct each group to create a list of traits that come to mind when they think of a full service hotel and a list of traits of a limited service hotel. The posters will be hung in a selected area of the classroom.

    Revisit the posters at the end of lesson to see how well students predicted full service hotel amenities.

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Review terms, definitions, and objectives.

    Distribute Types of Lodging Properties Student Notes handout (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that students may take notes during slide presentation.

    Begin with Types of Lodging Properties I and later Types of Lodging Properties II PowerPoints™ (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and begin discussion with students. Allow for questions and answers to check for understanding.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • highlighting materials for emphasis
    • providing students with vocabulary list with definitions prior to lesson
    • working with a peer tutor (assign a peer tutor to assist the student with completing the Types of Lodging Properties Guided Notes handout)
    • using study guides
    • Provide printed PowerPoint™ Types of Lodging Properties Presentation Notes to assist with completion of Types of Lodging Properties Guided Notes Worksheet.

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Assign research project: Types of Lodging Properties Project (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Students may work in sub groups of 2 or 3 to gather information needed. Explain assignment in detail.

    Introduce and review Rubric for PowerPoint™ Presentation (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that students understand how each project component will be assessed.

    Model and guide students through an example of a search for a hotel web page. Focus on aspects you are looking at to determine the type of lodging property such as amenities and services.

    Review general expectations for presentations:

    • Student must stand at front of class
    • Student must face the audience
    • Do not read the slides verbatim
    • No gum chewing
    • Business posture

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • working with a peer tutor
    • using of a study guide
    • providing printed slide presentation notes

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Students will independently gather information for the Types of Lodging PowerPoint™ Properties Project (see All Lessons Attachment tab). Offer assistance as needed. Students may visit reliable hotel websites to create a slide presentation, providing an example of each of the types of properties.
    Each example should include the following:

    • A picture of the property
    • The name of the property
    • The physical address of the property; city and state (we want to know where the property is located)
    • The type of property and the definition or justification for your selection (you may have to discuss some of the amenities of the property.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • reducing length of assignments
    • providing extra time for assignments

  • Lesson Closure

    Distribute Amenities and Properties T Chart (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Ask students to record information they can recall. Students may work in sub groups of 2-3 and use their notes. Review chart results, lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Revisit the posters created at the beginning of the lesson (list of traits of full service hotels and list of traits of limited service hotels) to see how well students predicted full service hotel amenities and limited service hotel amenities.

    Review for lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Assess Types of Lodging Properties PowerPoint Project (see All Lesson Attachments tab) with with rubric.

    Option: Administer and assess Types of Lodging Properties Quiz (see All Lesson Attachments tab).

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • allowing extended time for testing
    • allowing students to use notes and printed vocabulary for quiz

  • References/Resources

    Textbooks:

    • Reynolds, Johnny Sue. Hospitality Services Food & Lodging. Second. Tinley Park, Illinois: The Goodheart-Willcox Company, Inc., 2010. Print.
    • Lodging Management Program Year One
      AHLA Educational Institute
      ISBN 0-86612-214-1
  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • use “word wall” for vocabulary words
    • work with a peer tutor
    • peer to read materials
    • highlighted materials for emphasis
    • shortened simplified instructions
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Recommended Strategies

    Reading Strategies

    Magazine:

    • Hotel Business Trade Magazine
      http://subscribe.hotelbusiness.com (free subscription)
      Allow students to research and identify examples of the different types of lodging properties. Use the pre-reading strategy prediction.
  • Quotes

    Aim for service and success will follow.
    -Albert Schweitzer

    Do something wonderful, people may imitate it.
    -Albert Schweitzer

    Do something. If it works, do more of it. If it doesn’t, do something else.
    -Franklin D. Roosevelt

  • Multimedia/Visual Strategies

    PowerPoint™:

    • Types of Lodging Properties I
    • Types of Lodging Properties II

    Websites:

    Students may include a video link from a hotel website into the slide presentation project.

    • Hospitality Net
      Visit this site for photos that may be used as examples of the different kinds of properties. Click on the photos tab on the left of the homepage. Sign up for the weekly newsletter for up to date industry information. Great site for students to use for current event assignments.
      http://www.hospitalitynet.org
    • Trip Advisor
      Lists worldwide hotel sites. Students can view the site for information and link to the actual hotel site. Due to copyright rules, students cannot cut and paste information, but can link for information purposes.
      http://www.tripadvisor.com

    Files for downloading:

  • Graphic Organizers/Handout

    Graphic Organizer:

    • Amenities and Properties T Chart

    Handouts:

    • Hotel Tour Worksheet
    • Rubric for PowerPoint™ Presentation
    • Types of Lodging Properties Guided Notes Worksheet
    • Types of Lodging Properties PowerPoint™ Project
    • Types of Lodging Properties Quiz

    Files for downloading:

  • Writing Strategies

    Journal Entries:

    • My family and I most often stay in _______________ (type of hotel, not the brand) hotels because……….
    • When I am paying for my own travel, I would most likely stay in _______________ (type of hotel, not the brand) hotels because…
    • I think that celebrities should stay in ________________ (type of hotel, not the brand) hotels because

    Writing Strategies:

    • RAFT writing strategy – Role, audience, format, topic
      Write a letter to your parents asking to stay in one of the properties that you have included in your PowerPoint™ Project. Be sure to include your reasons for wanting to stay at that hotel.
  • Communication 90 Second Speech Topics

    • My most impressive hotel experience to date has been …..
    • My worst hotel experience to date has been …..
  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    Visit a local hotel. Identify the type of property. Take at least five pictures which support your selection of the type of property. Create a poster with your pictures to present in class.

    Math Assessment Question

    (8) The student uses information technology tools specific to hotel management to access, manage, integrate, and create information. The student is expected to:

    • (E) evaluate internet resources for industry information.

    Question 2. The chart below shows the results of an advertising survey given by a hotel.

    (View chart in showme video link)

    Which of the following is a conclusion that is not supported by the advertising survey?
    a. More than twice as many people watch TV as read the newspaper.
    b. 18% of the hotels business comes from referrals.
    c. Most people came to the hotel because of television advertising.
    d. A total of 28 people took the survey.

  • Family/Community Connection

    Take a tour of a hotel or lodging property in your community. This can be done as a class or individually as a homework assignment. Refer to Hotel Tour Worksheet (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Present findings to class.

  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career, Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)

    http://www.texasfccla.org

    Star Events:

    • Applied Technology – An individual or team event – recognizes participants who develop a project using technology that addresses a concern related to Family and Consumer Sciences and/or related occupations. The project integrates and applies content from academic subjects.

    PowerPoint™ presentations can be used for Applied Technology STAR Event Participation. Lesson is preparation for Hospitality LEO Test.

  • Service Learning Projects

    True service learning is developed with student voice about concerns and needs. As the students are learning and researching this topic, ask them to think about ways they can maximize their learning to benefit others.
    Ask students how they will use what they have learned about types of lodging.
    Use the LEADERS Model from http://www.servicelearningtexas.org
    Brainstorm with your students for a service project pertaining to this lesson.
    Example:
    Students design a flyer to promote a local business (grocery store, medical facility, bank, library, etc) for tourists. Ask local hotel properties to post the flyer to help boost the local economy.

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