The Impact of Technology on the Family Life Cycle

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Human Services

    Course : Interpersonal Studies

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (8) The student determines how changes occurring throughout the family life cycle impact individuals and families. The student is expected to:
      • (D) predict the effects of technological advances on families throughout the family life cycle
      • (E) formulate a plan for effective management of technology on families throughout the family life cycle
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • formulate a plan for effective management of technology on families throughout the family life cycle
    • list and describe the effects of technological advances on families throughout the family life cycle
  • Rationale

    Could you go an entire day without using technology? What would your day be like? Does your family rely on technology on a daily basis? How? Is technology a hindrance or an assistance tool to your family? Although we have many advances in technology to help with everyday life, it has become a barrier between family members and friends. We do not communicate nor spend time with each other as we once did. People do not have to verbally communicate anymore because we have “gadgets” that do it for us. This has had an effect on the way we interact with others and has affected quality time with family and friends. What are the positive and negative implications of using technology on family life?

  • Duration of Lesson

    Three 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Automated Teller Machines (ATMs): Convenient computerized machines that facilitate banking transactions at numerous locations 24 hours a day

    Blogs: Web pages that are like a diary. They usually have new things put on them each day by
    the author who owns the blog

    Bluetooth Technology: Is a wireless communications system intended to replace the cables connecting portable and/or fixed electronic devices

    Chat: Communication between two people using a computer. The chat appears on the screen
    after you have typed it. It is like being in a room talking to people except that you are typing
    your messages on a computer

    Email: Messages sent from one person to another. It is the same as sending a written letter to
    a friend except you type an email and send it to an email address using a computer

    Internet: Is a global system of interconnected computer networks that use the standard Internet protocol suite (TCP/IP) to serve billions of users worldwide

    Intrusive: Enter your life without invitation

    Mobile Phone: Provides a quick way to write and send an SMS (text message), an MMS (picture
    message) or make a phone call

    Social Networking: A website that can have profiles of people, blogs, chat and messaging

    Telecommuting: The practice of working at home – rather than commuting or traveling to work

    Web Site: Location on the World Wide Web that provides information, services, or products

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer lab with Internet access (be sure to follow district guidelines)
    • computers/laptops with printer capability
    • overhead projector/Elmo
    • presenter/remote
    • reserve computer lab, if needed

    Materials:

    • cell phone
    • expired ATM card
    • headsets
    • IPad
    • IPhone
    • lap top
    • play money
    • video games
    • XBox

    Supplies:

    • paper
    • pen

    • copies of all handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Anticipatory Set

    Before class begins:

    Display as many of the lesson-related supplies (see Materials or Specialized Equipment Needed) or pictures of the items, on a table in front of the classroom.

    -

    Have students raise their hands if they use the following technology devices/programs in their home or person. You may assign a student to be a scribe and record the responses on the board.

    • blogging
    • chat
    • computer
    • email
    • if you have more than one television in your home
    • if you have your own personal cell phone
    • iPod
    • iPad
    • iTunes
    • instant messaging
    • lap top
    • play stations
    • Skype
    • social networking
    • Twitter
    • vehicles with Bluetooth
    • Webinars
    • WII (interactive video)
    • Xbox (video games)

    Keep asking until you have exhausted the list. Ask students for additional technology devices/programs not on the list. Discuss the results and the impact technology has on family life.

    Distribute KWL Chart- The Impact of Technology on Family Life (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and have students complete the first two sections of chart. The last section will be completed during lesson closure.

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Distribute graphic organizer The Impact of Technology on the Family Life Cycle Notes (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that students may take notes during the slide presentation. Teacher to determine what information needs to be included in the note-taking document.

    Introduce PowerPoint™ The Impact of Technology on the Family Life Cycle (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Allow time for questions and class discussion.

    YouTube™ videos included in the PowerPoint™:

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • preferential seating
    • check for understanding
    • provide assistance for notetaking
    • repeated review
    • positive reinforces

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Distribute The Impact of Technology on Your Family Members (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Students will write down all technology devices which are used by them or family members. They will list the daily, weekly, or monthly responsibilities and ways technology makes tasks easier. The students will complete the handout by answering the questions.

    Refer to PowerPoint™ presentation for additional information.

    Allow for questions and discussion.

    • How has technology impacted your family life?
    • Does it cause a hindrance, hardship, or convenience?
    • If your parents were to do this activity, would their list be different than yours? Why or why not?
    • If your grandparents were to do this activity, would their list be different than yours? Why or why not?
    • What are the effects of technological advances on families throughout the family life cycle?

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • check for understanding
    • positive reinforcements
    • provide printed powerpoint notes

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Distribute Technology’s Role in the Family Life Cycle (Survey) (see All Lesson Attachments tab).

    The everyday activities that take place in the family often involve computer devices and technology that were not readily available several years ago. These include developments in devices, new communication technologies, and online services/options.
    Students will complete a chart that includes how families use technology. The stages of the Family Life Cycle are as follows:

    • Beginning Stage
    • Childbearing Stage
    • Parenting Stage
    • Launching Stage
    • Mid-Years Stage
    • Aging Stage

    The chart must include ten recent technological advances, such as digital movies, social networking and the use of Apps. Students may use technology to conduct the chart. They may text it, email it, use a social media or make copies of the chart. Distribute the chart to 10 people. Students must include at least one person from each stage of the family life cycle.

    Students will ask the following seven questions:

    • What impact has technology made on your family?
    • How has modern technology benefited you or your family medically?
    • Identify two ways technology affects individuals, families, the workplace, and society (Positively).
    • Identify two ways technology affects individuals, families, the workplace, and society (Negatively).
    • What are some benefits and drawbacks of the entertainment options many homes have?
    • List two ways technology has improved transportation.
    • How has technology influenced the educational process?

    Compile the resulting information, and find the percentage of people who use each item and the average frequency at which they use it. Summarize their answers to the seven questions. Then formulate a plan on the effective management of technology by families throughout the family life cycle using all the data collected in the chart.

    Distribute Rubric-Plan for Effective Management of Technology on Families (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so students understand what is expected.

    Students will work independently surveying and collecting information for their technology charts. At the end of class, assess progress of students.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • assist students with gathering information
    • provide positive reinforcements
    • reduce length of assignment
    • give extra time if needed

  • Lesson Closure

    Review lesson objectives, terms, and definitions

    Students will complete last section of the KWL Chart-The Impact of Technology on Family Life (see All Lesson Attachments tab)

    Have students discuss how technology has benefited family life and how it has hindered family life.

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Students will be assessed with appropriate rubric.

    The plan on the effective management of technology by families throughout the family life cycle assignment will be assessed.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • grade according to work completed
    • provide positive reinforcements

  • References/Resources

    Images:

    • Microsoft Clip Art: Used with permission from Microsoft.

    Textbook:

    • Decker, C. (2011). Child Development Early Stages Through Age 12. (7th ed., 50-73, 61-63). Tinley Park: Goodheart-Willcox Company, Inc.

    Websites:

    • Forum on Child and Family Statistics
      The Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics, or the Forum, is a working group of Federal
      agencies that collect, analyze, and report data on issues related to children and families. The Forum has
      partners from 22 Federal agencies as well as partners in private research organizations.
      http://www.childstats.gov/index.asp
    • Maternal and Child Health
      The Federal Title V Maternal and Child Health program has provided a foundation for ensuring the health
      of the nation’s mothers, women, children, and youth, including children and youth with special health care
      needs, and their families. 
      http://mchb.hrsa.gov/
    • OnGuard Online: Protect Kids Online
      Kids have lots of opportunities for socializing online, but they come with certain risks.
      Parents can help reduce these risks by talking to kids about making safe, responsible
      decisions.
      http://www.onguardonline.gov/

    YouTube™:

  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • Make sure students understand the vocabulary (word wall) before moving forward with this lesson. They are to make flash cards using an index card with the word on one side of the card and the definition on the other side. It is important for all students; especially ELL’s, to have a firm foundation before moving forward. This is the key to them following the entire lesson.
    • Ask students to repeat your instructions back to you to be sure they know what is expected of them before each phase of the lesson.
    • Discuss vocabulary in detail and make sure everyone has a firm grasp on it before moving forward with the lesson.
    • Use graphic organizers and visuals to explain the lesson in detail.
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    • Ask students to watch television to identify the different family structures as a homework assignment. Cite examples of different types from TV shows, movies, literature, or history. For each type, list the positive and negative characteristics of each type of family structure.
    • Research the latest statistics on effects of societal, demographic, and economic trends on individuals and the family.
    • Research the process of adopting a child in the United States. Compare findings to adopting a child from another country.
    • Students can do research on the effects of technology and the way we communicate today.
    • You may order the NET CETERA Community Outreach Toolkit at
      https://OnGuardOnline.gov for practical tips from the federal government and the technology community to help you guard against internet fraud, secure your computers, and protect your privacy. To order free copies of this brochure, visit https://bulkorder.ftc.gov
  • Family/Community Connection

    Have a guest speaker come talk to the class about cyberbullying and other negative effects of the Internet.

    Refer to lesson Protecting Children Online for additional resources and activities at:
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/protecting-children-online/
    You text, you play games, you share photos and video. You update your status, you post comments, and you may spend some time in a virtual world. Being connected online is how you live your life. As you spend more and more of your time there, it can be easy to over-share, embarrass yourself, mess up your computer, and possibly get messages from creepy people. The truth is that there are some risks involved in socializing, playing, and communicating online. Children have lots of opportunities for socializing online, but they come with certain risks. Parents and caregivers can help reduce these risks by talking to kids about making safe, responsible decisions.

  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career, and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)

    http://texasfccla.org

    Star Event

    Applied Technology – An individual or team event that recognizes participants who develop a project using technology that addresses a concern related to Family and Consumer Sciences and/or related occupations and integrates and applies content from academic subjects. Participants must prepare a portfolio and an oral presentation.

  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to lesson.
    http://www.nylc.org/

    • Students can collect old cell phones to donate to women’s shelters.
    • Develop a flyer on “Protecting Children Online” with information, tips and resources for parents and caregivers. Distribute the flyer at a local health fair or at a daycare center.