The Balancing Act: Parenting Responsibilities

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Human Services

    Course : Child Development

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (3) The student investigates strategies for optimizing the development of infants of diverse backgrounds, including those with special needs. The student is expected to:
      • (A) explain the physical, emotional, social and intellectual needs of the infant
      • (C) draw conclusions regarding the impact of the infant on the family in areas such as roles, finances, responsibilities and relationships
      • (F) research the advantages of breastfeeding
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • comprehend the responsibilities for caring and promoting the safety of an infant
    • estimate the financial responsibilities of having a baby and providing the basic needs for the child
  • Rationale

    Script:

    The first year is critical to the physical, emotional, social and intellectual development of a child. Infants learn with all of their senses by using their eyes, ears, mouth and hands to explore their new world. It is important for parents to understand the aspects of growth during this stage to nurture healthy development of an infant. The financial obligations and responsibilities of parenthood are also a major concern. As a professional in the field of Child Development, it is important to understand all the aspects that affect a baby.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Five 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Attachment: Closeness between people that remains over time

    Budget: A plan to help manage money wisely

    Caregiver: A person who provides care for someone else

    Developmental tasks: The activities and responsibilities that arise at a certain period on one’s life

    Fixed expense: A set amount of money that a person is committed to pay

    Flexible expense: A cost that occurs repeatedly, but which varies in amount from one time period to the next

    Intellectual development: How people learn, what they learn and how they express what they know through language

    Parenting: The name given to the process of raising a child

    Responsibility: A condition in which a person assumes the duties, obligations and accountability for something

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer lab for Internet research (be sure to follow district guidelines)
    • computer with projector for PowerPoint™ presentation

    Note: If individual equipment is not available, teacher can utilize a projected copy as long as students can see the screen.

    Materials:

    • baby bathtub and items used to bathe the doll; baby soap, shampoo, towel
    • baby bottles
    • baby clothes
    • baby wipes
    • car seats
    • cloth diapers and diaper pins
    • diaper bags filled with disposable diapers
    • formula
    • life-sized dolls, Baby Think It Over™ dolls or flour babies (see enrichment activity) wrapped in receiving blankets
    • looped tape recording of a crying baby
    • receiving blankets

    Other appropriate lessons

    Focusing on the Needs of Children
    Principles of Human Services
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/focusing-on-the-needs-of-children

    Caregiving 101: Early Childhood Development
    Principles of Human Services
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/caregiving-101-early-childhood-development

    Parenting Skills and Relationships
    Child Development
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/parenting-skills-and-relationships

    Four Areas of Development: Infancy to Toddler
    Child Development
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/fours-areas-of-development-infancy-to-toddler/

    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Anticipatory Set

    Prior to class:

    Become familiar with PowerPoint™, handouts and activities.

    Display as many of the lesson-related supplies (see Materials or Specialized Equipment Needed) as you have available on a table in front of the room.

    Create or locate a looped tape recording of a crying baby.

    Have life-sized dolls, Baby Think It Over™ dolls or flour babies (see Enrichment Activity) in the classroom wrapped in receiving blankets in car seats.

    Include:

    • baby bottles
    • baby clothes
    • baby wipes
    • diaper bags filled with disposable diapers
    • formula

    As class begins:

    Have a looped recording of a crying baby playing in the background. Do not acknowledge the recording. Allow students to pick up and examine the child care items on the table.

    Acknowledge the sound of the crying baby and turn off the recording. Ask students how the crying made them feel. Be prepared to receive many different responses. Some will mention that they wanted to comfort the baby, while others may tell you they just wanted the “noise” to stop. Acknowledge all student responses.

    Have the students create a T-chart on their own paper. One column will be labeled “Responsibilities of Parenthood” and the other column will be labeled “Rewards of Parenthood.” Have the students brainstorm the responsibilities and rewards of parenthood. Allow time for the brainstorm session, discussion and sharing of their answers. Which column was longer and why?

    Have students brainstorm answers to the following:

    • What are your plans for the future? How would having a baby change your plans?
    • Have you ever babysat an infant? If so, please share your experience.
    • Are you ready for the responsibilities of caring for a baby?
    • Do you currently have the means to provide everything a baby needs?
    • When and why do babies cry?
      Student answers will vary but will include when a baby is hungry or needs to have his or her diaper changed. Babies may also cry when they are hot, cold, scared, lonely, sick, tired, bored or hurt.

    Distribute the KWL Chart-The Balancing Act: Parenting Responsibilities (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout, and have students complete the first two sections. The last section of the KWL Chart-The Balancing Act: Parenting Responsibilities handout will be completed during Lesson Closure.

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce the lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Begin by asking if any students have newborn or infant siblings or infant nephews or nieces. Allow those who do to tell the class about the tasks and responsibilities of caring for newborns and infants. Ask how involved they have been in caring for these siblings or others. Ask about the challenges they have seen or experienced while caring for newborns and infants.

    Scenario: Imagine you have a newborn baby.

    • Would you know how to care for the baby?
    • How much do you already know about meeting the needs of a newborn?
    • How much do you think it costs to have a baby? To raise a child to the age of 18?
    • Do you think you are ready to care for a newborn?

    Distribute Notes for The Balancing Act: Parenting Responsibilities (see All Lessons Attachment tab). Inform students that they will be expected to take notes and participate in discussions while viewing the slide presentation.

    Introduce the PowerPoint™ The Balancing Act: Parenting Responsibilities (see All Lessons Attachment tab).

    Use appropriate notes from Presentation Notes for The Balancing Act: Parenting Responsibilities (see All Lesson Attachments tab) for discussion.

    Using life-sized infant dolls, have students demonstrate the correct ways to hold a newborn and an infant.

    Demonstrate how to hold a baby while bottle feeding. Students will have questions about how much and how often to feed a baby. Distribute the Venn Diagram Compare and Contrast Breastfeeding and Bottle Feeding a Baby (see All Lessons Attachment tab) handout. Students will compare the benefits and cost of breastfeeding versus bottle feeding a baby. Have students discuss their findings.

    Demonstrate diaper changing with both cloth and disposable diapers. Students will have questions about how often change a baby. Stress the cost of disposable diapers and their effect on our environment.

    Using a doll, demonstrate how to bathe a baby. Allow students time to practice this skill. Stress the importance of safety during bath time.

    What are the financial responsibilities of parents? What do babies need during the first year of life?

    Discuss the basic needs of infants. Ask the students for ways parents or caregivers can meet the needs of infants in each area below:

    • Emotional needs
    • Intellectual needs
    • Physical needs
    • Social needs

    Videos included in the PowerPoint™ presentation:

    • 24 Hours with a Newborn
      Our baby Joshua is two weeks old and this video shows what a typical day is like with him.
      http://youtu.be/m9QndNXcnCU

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • encouraging participation and praise
    • providing the student with a copy of the slide presentation
    • directly assisting the students as they practice bathing, feeding and diapering a baby

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Focus on the costs involved in meeting the needs of child, from newborn up to the age of 18. Discuss the concepts of budgeting and cost of living.

    Introduce The Balancing Act: Parenting Responsibilities Financial Research Project and Rubric for The Balancing Act: Parenting Responsibilities Financial Research Project handouts (see All Lessons Attachments tab).

    Scenario: You and your spouse are preparing for the arrival of your first child. You would like to know approximately how much raising this child will cost over the course of 18 years.

    The students will conduct research from information on the Internet to determine costs and create a realistic budget using the provided project handout as a guide.

    Assist students as they work on their budgets.

    After examining primary sources from the Internet, students will understand the financial responsibilities of having a baby. The focus of this activity is to also reinforce the needs of a child.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • allowing extra time to complete this section of the assignment
    • emphasizing major points
    • shortening the length of the assignment

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Students will be provided with time to complete the The Balancing Act: Parenting Responsibilities Financial Research Project. Provide guidance as needed. Allow students to proofread and edit each other’s work and practice the oral component of their projects before class presentations.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • breaking down difficult tasks
    • providing extra time for the oral component of the project

  • Lesson Closure

    Review lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Complete the third section of the KWL Chart-The Balancing Act: Parenting Responsibilities handout (see All Lesson Attachments tab).

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Students will give an oral summary of their The Balancing Act: Parenting Responsibilities Financial Research Project to the class. Allow students to compare their findings.

    The project will be submitted and assessed with Rubric for The Balancing Act: Parenting Responsibilities Financial Research Project (see All Lesson Attachments tab).

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • providing frequent feedback
    • reducing the assignment

  • References/Resources

    Images:

    • Microsoft Clip Art: Used with permission from Microsoft™.
    • Photos obtained through a license with Shutterstock.com™.
    • United States Department of Agriculture.

    Books:

    Textbooks:

    • Clark, P., Couch, S., & Felstehausen, G. (2011). Managing life skills. Columbus, OH: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
    • Decker, Celia. (2011). Child development; early stages through age 12. 7th. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox.
    • Ryder, V., & Harter, M. B. (2010). Contemporary living. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox.

    Websites:

    • National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
      Includes information on child safety precautions and laws pertaining to child safety seats.
      http://www.nhtsa.gov/Safety/CPS

    Videos:

    • 24 Hours with a Newborn
      Our baby Joshua is two weeks old and this video shows what a typical day is like with him.
      http://youtu.be/m9QndNXcnCU
  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • use drawings, dramatic gestures, actions, emotions, voice, mime, chalkboard sketches, photographs and visual materials to provide clues to meanings
    • if necessary, repeat your actions using the same simple structures and actions
    • simplify your message as much as possible, breaking it into smaller, manageable parts
    • make sure a new student’s attention is focused to give him or her a chance at comprehending
    • don’t insist that students make eye contact with you when you are speaking to them as this is considered rude in many cultures
    • word wall
    • pictured word wall—draw or provide visual representations of terms on the word wall
    • visit http://www.learnerdictionary.com for the pronunciations and meanings of terms related to parenting responsibilities
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    OPTIONAL ACTIVITY: Students will incorporate additional activities into this lesson by creating a flour baby. Have students view A New Kind of “Flour Baby” slide presentation to understand how to create a flour baby. You may choose to incorporate this activity into this lesson and assess it with a rubric at http://cte.sfasu.edu/classroom-essentials/rubrics/. The actual making of the flour babies can be completed at home or before and after school.

    See Teacher Guidelines for Optional Activity: Flour Baby Project (see All Lessons Attachment tab) and A New Kind of “Flour Baby” PowerPoint™ (see All Lessons Attachment tab) for specific instructions.

    Human Services Child Development Math Assessment Problem

    (3) The student investigates strategies for optimizing the development of infants of diverse backgrounds, including those with special needs. The student is expected to:

    • (C) draw conclusions regarding the impact of the infant on the family in areas such as roles, finances, responsibilities and relationships

    Question 7. Infants need to receive 30 minutes of touch every three hours during the first year of life in order to develop healthy attachments. Approximately how many days of physical touch does this accumulate to over the year?
    a. 30 days
    b. 60 days
    c. 90 days
    d. 120 days

    TED Talks:

    TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks videos and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event.

    The video below is related to this lesson. Allow the students to view the video, and lead a discussion concerning the TEDTalk.

    Jane Chen: A warm embrace that saves lives
    In the developing world, access to incubators is limited by cost and distance, and millions of premature babies die each year. TED Fellow Jane Chen shows an invention that could keep millions of these infants warm — a design that’s safe, portable, low-cost and life-saving.
    http://youtu.be/IwidCkCmWg4

  • Family/Community Connection

    Invite a nurse from the local hospital or the school nurse to come to your class to talk about how to care for infants.

  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career, Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)
    http://www.texasfccla.org

    Family First Project

    • The FCCLA Families First Project is a national peer education program through which youth gain a better understanding of how families work and learn skills to become strong family members. Its goals are to: help youth become strong family members and leaders for today and tomorrow and strengthen the family as the basic unit of society. To help members focus their projects, Families First offers five units. Members may complete projects in one or several units. There is no particular order to them; however, “Families Today” might be a good place to start. It covers topics that provide a general overview of families and related issues:
      • Families Today: Understand and celebrate families
      • You-Me-Us: Strengthen family relationships
      • Meet the Challenge: Overcome obstacles together
      • Balancing Family and Career: Manage multiple responsibilities
      • Parent Practice: Learn to nurture children
  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to the lesson.
    http://www.ysa.org

    Example:

    • Students will have a baby item drive for a local clothing closet or children’s home.
    • The students will determine what the needs of the children are and conduct an assistance drive (socks, shoes and blankets) to donate to the children.
    • As a reflection, the students will evaluate how their community service skills aided them in the project. Do they feel they made an impact at the community venue and school? Compare the impact the project made on class members before they started the project and after the project was completed. Did the project achieve its purpose? What might they do differently next time?
    • What did students gain from this experience both in learning and in the service? (This could be a written reflection on what students learned from the experience and how this knowledge will help them in the future.)