The Balancing Act: Managing a Career and Family – Hotel Management

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Hospitality and Tourism

    Course : Hotel Management

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (1) The student gains academic knowledge and skills required to pursue the full range of career and postsecondary education opportunities within the hotel industry.
      • (D) infer how scientific principles are used in the hotel industry
    • (5) The student develops principles in time management, decision-making, effective communication, and prioritizing. The student is expected to:
      • (A) apply effective practices for managing time and energy
      • (B) implement stress-management techniques
      • (D) analyze the importance of balancing a career, family, and leisure activities
    • (9) The student uses leadership and teamwork skills in collaborating with others to accomplish organizational goals and objectives. The student is expected to:
      • (A) apply team-building skills
      • (B) apply decision-making and problem-solving skills
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • analyze the demands of employment in the hotel industry
    • identify steps to time management
    • analyze time-saving techniques
    • illustrate a 30-day calendar of activities
    • analyze stress-management techniques
    • balance objects representing a career, family, time, energy and leisure activities
    • understand the scientific principles of physics and geometrical shapes
  • Rationale

    One of the challenges in life is balancing work, family, hobbies and other activities we like to do. The demands of a job sometimes leaves us with little time to enjoy leisure activities. In this lesson, we are going to learn some time-saving techniques and team-building skills to balance work and family.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Three 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Balance: To keep something in a steady position so that it is even

    Career: An occupation undertaken for a significant period of a person’s life and with opportunities for progress

    Decision: A conclusion or resolution reached after consideration

    Energy: The strength and vitality required for sustained physical or mental activity

    Family: A group consisting of parents and children living together in a household

    Leisure: Free time

    Time Management: The act or process of planning and exercising conscious control over the amount of time spent on specific activities, especially to increase effectiveness, efficiency or productivity

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for PowerPoint™ presentation

    Materials:

    • cardstock (white or colored)
    • markers

    Supplies:

    • balance scale
    • batteries (may represent energy)
    • clock (may represent time)
    • family magazines (may represent family photo albums)
    • hotel magazine (may represent careers)
    • rubber bands (may represent the circle of life)
    • straws (may represent leisure activities)
    • sunglasses (may represent leisure activities)

    Other objects available may be used to represent careers, family, time, energy and leisure activities.

    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Anticipatory Set

    Before class begins:

    Become familiar with the following video and website as students will be attempting this procedure in the Independent Practice section:

    • Balancing Act – Sick Science! #130
      With a little knowledge of physics and geometrical shapes, you can perform this balancing act
      http://youtu.be/CnejrcOhj5g


    Display as many of the supplies listed in the Materials or Specialized Equipment Needed section as you have available.

    Download the song Cat’s in the Cradle by Harry Chapin (1973) and play it as students enter the classroom or view the YouTube™ of the lyrics.

    • Harry Chapin – Cat’s In The Cradle (Lyrics)
      The song is told in first-person by a father who is too busy to spend time with his son.
      http://youtu.be/WBcdBQM01pE

    This song has been featured in the following movies and T.V. shows:

    • Family Guy
    • Modern Family
    • Shrek the Third (sung by Donkey)
    • The Middle
    • The Office
    • The Simpsons (three times)
    • Two and a Half Men

    Ask students the following questions:

    • Have you heard this song before?
    • What do you think the song means?
    • What should we do about time spent at work?
    • What should we do about time spent with family?
    • How do you think your parents balance their work and family?
    • What will you do differently?

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Distribute graphic organizer The Balancing Act: Managing a Career and Family – Hote Management Notes (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that students may take notes during slide presentation.

    Introduce PowerPoint™ The Balancing Act: Managing a Career and Family – Hotel Management (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and lead a discussion on the importance of balancing a job and family.

    View video from NBC News:

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • check for understanding
    • provide copy of slide presentation

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Distribute graphic organizer Personal Activities Calendar (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and have students fill in the dates for the appropriate month.

    Discuss the importance of time management and stress that learning to manage their busy schedules early on will lead to oranizational skills that will last a lifetime.

    Students should include their personal activities for 30 days (examples are included).

    Distribute graphic organizer 12 Stress-Management Techniques (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and discuss with students how they manage stress.

    Students should read each technique and write how they would manage stress.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • check for understanding
    • allow extra time for assignment

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Divide the class into subgroups of four.

    Reinforce the importance of balancing work, family, time, energy and leisure activities.

    Share some examples of how you have balanced your family, career, time and energy.

    Refer to handout The Balancing Act Activity (see All Lesson Attachments tab) to outline the hands-on activity.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • encourage participation
    • peer tutoring

  • Lesson Closure

    Review the lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Play the YouTube™ video again and discuss the words to the song.

    • Harry Chapin – Cat’s In The Cradle (Lyrics)
      The song is told in first-person by a father who is too busy to spend time with his son.
      http://youtu.be/WBcdBQM01pE

    Have students write a reflection paper on how this song may affect them now and/or in the future.

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Students will demonstrate their balancing project to the class and will be assessed with a visual observation.

    This activity is designed to be a fun teambuilding assignment.

    Optional: Distribute Rubric for Participation in The Balancing Act Activity (see All Lesson Attachments tab) as an assessment.

    Distribute Way to Go Certificate (see All Lesson Attachments tab) to the groups who were able to exhibit the teambuilding and problem-solving skill of “Balancing a Career and Family Activity.”

    Optional: Distribute Rubric for Participation in The Balancing Act Activity (see All Lesson Attachments tab) as an assessment.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • monitor progress
    • praise participation

  • References/Resources

    Textbooks:

    • Kelly-Plate, J., & Eubanks, E. (2004). Today’s teen. New York, NY: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
    • Reynalds, J.S. (2010). Hospitality services: Food & lodging. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.

    Websites:

    YouTube™:

    • Harry Chapin – Cat’s In The Cradle (Lyrics)
      The song is told in first-person by a father who is too busy to spend time with his son.
      http://youtu.be/WBcdBQM01pE
    • Balancing Act – Sick Science! #130
      With a little knowledge of physics and geometrical shapes, you can perform this balancing act
      http://youtu.be/CnejrcOhj5g

    Video:

  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    TED Talks:

    TED is a nonprofit devoted to spreading ideas, usually in the form of short, powerful talks (18 minutes or less). The video below is related to this lesson. Allow students to view the video and lead a discussion concerning the TED Talk.

    • Tom Wujec: Build a tower, build a team
      Tom Wujec presents some surprisingly deep research into the “marshmallow problem” — a simple team-building exercise that involves dry spaghetti, one yard of tape and a marshmallow. Who can build the tallest tower with these ingredients? And why does a surprising group always beat the average?
      http://www.ted.com/talks/tom_wujec_build_a_tower

    Challenge students to do this activity as well.

  • Family/Community Connection

    Create a family calendar (print or digital) to keep track of birthdays, anniversaries, appointments, activities, games and other important information.
    Assist your family in keeping the calendar updated weekly so events are not missed.

  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career and Community Leaders of America

    http://www.fcclainc.org

    • Hospitality, Tourism, and Recreation
      An individual or team event, recognizes participants who demonstrate their knowledge of the hospitality, tourism, and recreation industries and ability to translate their knowledge into a hypothetical or real business. Project must relate to culinary, lodging, recreation, tourism, or event coordination.
    • Illustrated Talk
      An individual or team event – recognizes participants who make an oral presentation about issues concerning Family and Consumer Sciences and/or related occupations. Participants use visuals to illustrate content of the presentation.
  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to lesson.

    www.ysa.org

    Example:
    Students may provide team building activities at local community events or fairs.

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