Stories, Stories and More Stories

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Education and Training

    Course : Human Growth and Development

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    Human Growth and Development

    • (3) The student understands the development of children ages newborn through two years. The student is expected to:
      • (A) analyze the physical, emotional, social, and cognitive development of infants and toddlers
      • (B) analyze various developmental theories relating to infants and toddlers
      • (C) discuss the influences of the family and society on the infant and toddler
      • (D) summarize strategies for optimizing the development of infants and toddlers, including those with special needs
      • (F) determine developmentally appropriate guidance techniques for children in the first two years of life
    • (4) The student understands the development of children ages three through five years. The student is expected to:
      • (A) analyze the physical, emotional, social and cognitive development of preschoolers
      • (B) analyze various developmental theories relating to preschoolers
      • (C) discuss the influences of the family and society on preschoolers
      • (D) summarize strategies for optimizing the development of preschoolers, including those with special needs
    • (5) The student understands the development of children ages six through ten years. The student is expected to:
      • (A) analyze the physical, emotional, social, and cognitive development of children in the early to middle childhood stage of development
      • (B) analyze various developmental theories relating to children in the early to middle childhood stage of development
      • (C) discuss the influences of the family and society on children in the early to middle childhood stage of development
      • (D) summarize strategies for optimizing the development of children in the early to middle childhood stage of development, including those with special needs

    Instructional Practices in Education and Training

    • (2) The student understands the learner and the learning process. The student is expected to:
      • (A) relate principles and theories of human development to teaching and training situations
      • (B) relate principles and theories about the learning process to teaching and training situations
      • (D) explain the relationship between effective instructional practices and learning differences, learner exceptionality and special-needs conditions
    • (3) The student communicates effectively. The student is expected to:
      • (A) demonstrate effective verbal, nonverbal, written, and electronic communication skills
      • (C) evaluate the role of classroom communications in promoting student literacy and learning
      • (D) demonstrate effective communication skills in teaching and training

    Practicum in Education and Training

    • (2) The student understands the learner and learning process. The student is expected to:
      • (A) apply principles and theories of human development appropriate to specific teaching or training situations
      • (B) apply principles and theories about the learning process to specific teaching or training situations
      • (D) suggest effective instructional practices to accommodate learning differences, learner exceptionality and special-needs conditions
    • (3) The student communicates effectively. The student is expected to:
      • (A) assess the effectiveness of personal verbal, non-verbal, written and electronic communication skills
      • (C) evaluate the role of classroom communications in promoting student literacy and learning
      • (D) integrate effective communication skills in teaching or training
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • focus on the importance of character education and character development
    • understand the theories of moral human development
    • incorporate knowledge of human growth and development as they create an original creative writing, illustration, and presentation
    • demonstrate effective verbal, nonverbal, written and electronic communication skills
    • reinforce positive values at home, at school and in the community by encouraging appropriate student behavior, ethical decision-making and academic performance
    • have an opportunity to hold/participate in a local story book competition
  • Rationale

    Children’s stories have always been special and the source of stimulation of the imagination. They generate creativity and unique storytelling. Stories allow children a connection to people and the world. Reading allows children a safe place to learn and be entertained. Stories provide an avenue to explore new ideas, morals and promote intellectual development. Have you ever wanted to write a children’s story? What would you write about? In this lesson, you are going to have the opportunity to do just that!

  • Duration of Lesson

    Three to four 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Author: A person who has written something, especially someone who has written a book or who writes many books

    Competition: The act or process of trying to get or win something (such as a prize or a higher level of success) that someone else is also trying to get or win

    Criteria: Something that is used as a reason for making a judgment or decision

    Distinct: Presenting a clear, unmistakable impression

    Format: The shape, size and general makeup (as of something printed)

    Illustrator: One who provides visual features intended to explain or decorate

    Intellectual development: Refers to the growth of children in such a way that their brains become more and more capable of understanding and evaluating concepts to make sense out of the world around them

    Moral: Concerning or relating to what is right and wrong in human behavior

    Trait: A quality that makes one person or thing different from another

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for PowerPoint™ presentation
    • computers with Internet access (be sure to follow district guidelines for Internet access)
    • presenter remote

    Materials:

    • children’s books that exhibit moral character(s) in the story
    • popular children’s books such as:
      • Love You Forever
      • How Do Dinosaurs Say I Love You?
      • The Giving Tree

    Supplies:

    • colored pencils
    • construction paper
    • crayons
    • glue
    • markers
    • scissors
    • sticky notes
    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Anticipatory Set

    Prior to class:

    • Become familiar with PowerPoints™, handouts and activities.

    Before class begins:

    Display as many of the lesson-related supplies (see Materials or Specialized Equipment Needed) as you have available on a table in front of the room.

    Before class begins:

    Remove chairs, tables/desks and ask the students to sit in a conversation circle on the floor when they enter (like they may have done in elementary school)

    Then, as class begins, show them a popular children’s book, such as Love You Forever, How Do Dinosaurs Say I Love You? or The Giving Tree. Allow them make inferences about the book, then read it to the class.

    Begin the class with the following questions and have students share their responses:

    • What was your favorite book as a child and how did it relate to your development?
    • Why was it your favorite book?
    • How have books changed since you were a toddler? A preschool child? A school-age child?
    • What are morals?
    • Why is it important to teach morals to children?
  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Note to teacher: Prior to beginning this lesson, please review, preview and select the appropriate multimedia for your classes.

    Introduce lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    If the outcome of this lesson will be used to enter the TAFE competitive event CHILDREN’S LITERATURE COMPETITION, review competition guidelines at this time. See TAFE Advisor Handbook for details.

    Distribute handout Slide Presentation Notes (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Students will be expected to take notes while viewing the slide presentation. Teacher will determine the notes to be recorded by students.

    Introduce PowerPoint™ Stories, Stories and More Stories (see All Lesson Attachments tab).

    YouTube™ video included in the slide presentation:

    • Strategies for Reading Aloud to Children
      Join Breeyn Mack for a read-aloud of “Wash and Dry.” She uses strategies for helping young children to get the most out of the read-aloud experience such as emphasizing vocabulary, commenting on characters, and asking probing questions
      http://youtu.be/tZ2rL0eByfc
    • Your Book Starts Here – Storyboarding for Writers
      How a storyboard designs your book’s flow of chapters and ideas
      http://youtu.be/pMhLvMJ_r0Y

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • extra time for oral response
    • frequent feedback
    • positive feedback/praise
    • checking for understanding

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Inform students that they will write a short story appropriate for a specific grade level. Distribute Moral Character Story Ideas (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout. Students will complete the handout to assist them in developing their story lines.

    Which story line is your favorite? Why? Discuss all the ideas and brainstorm for assistance if necessary.

    Allow for questions and discussion.

    Instruct students to select one moral from Moral Character Story Ideas to further develop the story. Distribute Developing Your Story (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout and sticky notes to each student. Individually or with a partner, students will develop their story lines by utilizing a storyboard with their characters and ideas. Instruct the students to write his or her ideas on sticky notes first, and once they are satisfied with the flow of the story, they can complete the handout. Allow the students to review the YouTube™ video if they need further clarification for completing their storyboards.

    • Your Book Starts Here – Storyboarding for Writers
      How a storyboard designs your book’s flow of chapters and ideas
      http://youtu.be/pMhLvMJ_r0Y

    After the students have completed the handout, they will proceed with producing their stories during Independent Practice.

    Teacher note: You have the option of assigning this as an assessment grade and/or entering it in the TAFE Storyboard Creation Competition. See Enrichment Activity.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • extra time for oral response
    • frequent feedback
    • praising the students
    • checking for understanding
    • providing a student mentor

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    The students may work individually or collaboratively in teams of two to create a story. The story will focus on the importance of morals and character development appropriate for a specific grade level. Distribute Children’s Book Project (see All Lesson Attachments tab).

    The story should include:

    • a story in a “book” format, which should promote a positive character trait of your choice as the main focus of the story
    • appropriate content written for a specific grade level audience chosen by the author and/or illustrator
    • a front and back cover and a title/credit page
    • a title page with the title of the story, moral, appropriate grade level and the author/illustrator’s name(s)
    • text and graphics which are either drawn by hand or computer generated
    • neat and colorful illustrations that relate to the story page

    Distribute Rubric for Storytelling (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that students may understand what is expected.

    Check stories for correct spelling, grammar and punctuation.

    Students will be provided with time to complete their projects. Provide guidance as needed. Allow students to proofread and edit each other’s work and practice the oral component of their projects before class presentations. Stories will be shared during Lesson Closure.

    Teacher note: You have the option of assigning this as an assessment grade and/or entering it in the TAFE CHILDREN’S LITERATURE COMPETITION. See Enrichment Activity.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • frequent teacher contact
    • frequent feedback
    • note-taking assistance
    • presentation assistance if needed

  • Lesson Closure

    Review lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Students will read and share the stories they created during Independent Practice.

    Distribute handout What Did You Learn Today? (see All Lesson Attachments tab). This lesson closure activity is an instructional strategy which allows students to summarize main ideas, evaluate class processes, answer questions posed at the beginning of the lesson, and link to both the past and future. It also allows the teacher to evaluate the progress of the students and lesson.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • extra time for oral response
    • praising the students
    • checking for understanding
    • providing a student mentor
    • modified quiz if specified in IEP

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Team presentations will be assessed with the previously provided rubric and personal reflection assignment.

    Students will each write a one-page personal reflection on what they learned from this lesson and how they plan to use the information now and in the future.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • extra time for responses
    • prompting, if necessary

  • References/Resources

    Images:

    • Microsoft Clip Art: Used with permission from Microsoft.

    Textbooks:

    • Curriculum Center for FCS. Ready, set, teach! Curriculum Guide. 2003.
    • Curriculum Center for FCS. Reaching to teach. 2005.

    Websites:

    • Reading is Fundamental
      To motivate young children to read by working with them, their parents and community members to make reading a fun and beneficial part of everyday life.
      http://www.bookpeopleunite.org/

    YouTube™:

    • Strategies for Reading Aloud to Children
      Join Breeyn Mack for a read-aloud of “Wash and Dry.” She uses strategies for helping young children to get the most out of the read-aloud experience such as emphasizing vocabulary, commenting on characters, and asking probing questions
      http://youtu.be/tZ2rL0eByfc
    • Your Book Starts Here – Storyboarding for Writers
      How a storyboard designs your book’s flow of chapters and ideas
      http://youtu.be/pMhLvMJ_r0Y
  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • Make sure students understand the vocabulary (word wall) before moving forward with this lesson. Instruct them to make flash cards using an index card with the word on one side of the card and the definition on the other. It is important for all students, especially ELL’s, to have a firm foundation before moving forward. This is the key to them following the entire lesson.
    • Ask students to repeat your instructions back to you to be sure they know what is expected of them before each new phase of the lesson.
    • Discuss vocabulary in detail and make sure everyone has a firm grasp of it before moving forward with the lesson.
    • Use graphic organizers and visuals to explain the lesson in detail.
    • Print fill-in-the-blank handouts of the PowerPoint™ notes for students to follow along with during the lesson
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Recommended Strategies

    Reading Strategies

    Current Events:
    Assign students to read about the importance of literacy in children.
    Information can be found in newspaper articles, magazines, journals and online print.
    Suggestions:

  • Quotes

    As parents, the most important thing we can do is read to our children early and often. Reading is the path to success in school and life. When children learn to love books, they learn to love learning.
    -Laura Bush

    The man who does not read has no advantage over the man who cannot read.
    -Mark Twain

    If you would tell me the heart of a man, tell me not what he reads, but what he rereads.
    -François Mauriac

    Once you learn to read, you will be forever free.
    -Frederick Douglass

    There is no such thing as a child who hates to read; there are only children who have not found the right book.
    -Frank Serafini

  • Multimedia/Visual Strategies

    PowerPoint™:

    • Stories, Stories and More Stories
    • Presentation Notes for Stories, Stories and More Stories

    Technology:

    Free iPad App:

    Reading to Children
    Benefits of reading to young children
    https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/reading-to-children/id582564293?mt=2

    Ted Talk:

    Mac Barnett: Why a good book is a secret door
    Childhood is surreal. Why shouldn’t children’s books be? In this whimsical talk, award-winning author Mac Barnett speaks about writing that escapes the page, art as a doorway to wonder — and what real kids say to a fictional whale.
    http://www.ted.com/talks/mac_barnett_why_a_good_book_is_a_secret_door

    YouTube™:

    • Strategies for Reading Aloud to Children
      Join Breeyn Mack for a read-aloud of “Wash and Dry.” She uses strategies for helping young children to get the most out of the read-aloud experience such as emphasizing vocabulary, commenting on characters, and asking probing questions
      http://youtu.be/tZ2rL0eByfc
    • Your Book Starts Here – Storyboarding for Writers
      How a storyboard designs your book’s flow of chapters and ideas
      http://youtu.be/pMhLvMJ_r0Y

    • Files for downloading:
  • Graphic Organizers/Handout

    Graphic Organizers:

    • Slide Presentation Notes
    • Developing Your Story

    Handouts:

    • Moral Character Story Ideas
    • Children’s Book Project
    • Scavenger Hunt – TAFE Children’s Literature Competition
    • Scavenger Hunt – TAFE Children’s Literature Competition (Key)
    • Rubric for Storytelling
    • TAFE Children’s Literature Competition

    • Files for downloading:
  • Writing Strategies

    Journal Entries:

    • It is wise to teach young children morals because _________________________.
    • Educators have the responsibility to enforce morals in their classrooms because ___________________.
    • The benefits of reading to children include ____________________.
    • My favorite book to read as a child was _____________________because _____________________.

    Writing Strategy:

    • RAFT (Role/Audience/Format/Topic) writing strategy:
      Role: parent
      Audience: teenager
      Format: letter
      Topic: the importance of reading to children
  • Communication 90 Second Speech Topics

    • Reading can foster _____________________in children.
    • I enjoyed creating a children’s book because ____________________.
    • Educators can promote literacy in their classroom by ______________.
    • The three stages in Kohlberg’s theory of moral development include ____________.
  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    • Students can choose a grade level to write a story based on morals. Share the book with children at an elementary school.
    • Research and list five methods for guiding children to literacy. Students may tell why they think each is effective and give examples they have observed during their educational activities.
    • Visit a local library to research books with a moral story line. Develop a list and present it to an elementary school librarian.
    • The mission of Texas Association of Future Educators (TAFE) is to foster the recruitment and development of prospective educators through the dissemination of innovative programming and relevant research. One of the ways we provide character and leadership skills is by encouraging students to participate in TAFE competitions. Students have the option to participate in the TAFE competition – Children’s Literature Competition. To familiarize themselves with the rules and guidelines of the competition, have the students complete Scavenger Hunt – TAFE Children’s Literature Competition (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout. Distribute TAFE Children’s Literature Competition (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout to assist in completing the scavenger hunt. Use Scavenger Hunt – TAFE Children’s Literature Competition (Key) (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout as a guide to check their answers.

    TED Talks:

    TED is a nonprofit organization devoted to spreading ideas, usually in the form of short, powerful talks (18 minutes or fewer). The video below is related to this lesson. Allow students to view the video, and lead a discussion concerning the TED Talk.
    Mac Barnett: Why a good book is a secret door
    Childhood is surreal. Why shouldn’t children’s books be? In this whimsical talk, award-winning author Mac Barnett speaks about writing that escapes the page, art as a doorway to wonder — and what real kids say to a fictional whale.
    http://www.ted.com/talks/mac_barnett_why_a_good_book_is_a_secret_door

  • Family/Community Connection

    • Invite the school librarian to demonstrate how to read to children.
    • Invite a local author of children’s books to discuss the importance of reading to children.
    • Conduct a book drive and donate educational books to children at an orphanage or homeless shelter.
  • CTSO connection

    Texas Association of Future Educators (TAFE)

    http://www.tafeonline.org

    • Children’s Literature Competition
      This is an individual or dual event. The book may be written and illustrated by one individual (the author/illustrator) or two individuals (an author and an illustrator). Assistance with illustrations using graphic design, computer animation or other artist assistance is permissible for the artwork of the book. Contestants should write a story in a “book” format. The story should be about anything that reinforces either academic or social/emotional values appropriate for public school. The story should promote a positive character trait of the competitor’s choice as the main focus of the story. Text and artwork may be either computer or hand generated.
  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to the lesson. For additional information on service learning see
    http://www.ysa.org/

    Develop a Read and Share tutorial program where you teach young children how to read. You can donate time and resources at a local elementary school, children’s hospital, orphanage or homeless shelter.

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