Setting the Tone: Table Setting, Dining, and Service

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
Loading...
FavoriteLoadingAdd to favorites
  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Hospitality and Tourism

    Course : Practicum in Culinary Arts

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (2) The student develops skills for success in the workplace. The student is expected to:
      • (D) demonstrate appropriate business and personal etiquette in the workplace
      • (E) exhibit productive work habits, ethical practices, and a positive attitude
      • (J) demonstrate effective verbal, non-verbal, written, and electronic communication skills
      • (K) apply effective listening skills used in the workplace
    • (10) The student understands the history of food service and the use of the professional kitchen. The student is expected to:
      • (L) Demonstrate types of table setting, dining, and service skills.
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • compare and contrast four types of table service
    • demonstrate types of table service
    • apply information on table setting, dining, and service skills
    • via electronic or textbook sources, create an information booklet on service skills
    • design a thematic table setting
  • Rationale

    You will be able to demonstrate how to better serve your customers by learning appropriate dining and service skills.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Three 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    American/German Service: Food is arranged on plates in the kitchen by cooks and brought directly to the guests’ table by the server

    Apprentice: One who works under the guidance of a skilled worker to learn a particular trade or art

    Captain: Responsible for a server area of usually 15 to 25 guests and is assisted by the front waiter or an apprentice

    English Service: Bowls and platters of food are placed on the table, and a seated host or hostess places the food on the plates; also known as family style dining

    French Service: Servers present the food to guests from a tableside cart; considered elegant but most expensive

    Front Waiter: Has only 1 or 2 years of experience and works with the captain

    Headwaiter: Responsible for service in a particular area such as banquet room or dining room

    Maitre d’hotel: Responsible for overall management of service

    Russian Service: All food preparation is done in the kitchen and the bowls and platters of food are then brought on a cart to guests at the table; most formal service style

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for PowerPoint™ presentation

    Materials:

    • blank white or colored paper (to make flip chart/book)
    • markers/colored pencils
    • table settings, plates and utensils
    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Anticipatory Set

    Before class begins:

    Place all the items needed for one place setting (dinner plate, bread & butter plate, glass, cup & saucer, dinner fork, salad fork, knife, spoon, napkin) on group tables.

    Divide students into subgroups of 4 or 5. Without any assistance, ask each group to make an attempt at placing the items on their table to display a formal “place setting.” When all groups have completed the task, have each group take turns explaining their effort.

    Inform students that throughout the course of this lesson they will learn proper “place setting etiquette.”
    Why is this knowledge important? How can knowing correct place setting etiquette help you in a social situation? food service job site? when hosting a dinner party?

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce objectives, terms and definitions.

    Introduce PowerPoint™: Setting the Tone: Table Setting, Dining, and Service (see All Lessons Attachments tab). Discuss what table setting has to do with restaurant service.
    As you are reviewing the slide presentation, students should be taking notes using the graphic organizer: Setting the Tone (see All Lessons Attachments tab).
    After reviewing the slide on setting & clearing tables, have students demonstrate proper serving techniques.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • allowing students to work with peers
    • providing printed PowerPoint™ slides with highlight main points

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Demonstrate how to properly set a basic table setting. Slowly add additional flatware to demonstrate the various types of table settings. As you demonstrate each type of place setting, have the students draw and label each place setting.
    Have students practice setting each of the four different types of place settings.

    • Distribute Setting The Tone Flip Chart assignment (see All Lessons Attachments tab). Demonstrate how to assemble the book/flip chart to your preference. Introduce students to the references that can be used to complete the assignment. Review helpful websites on the assignment sheet. Students may complete this assignment independently or with a partner and submit for a daily grade.

    Additional Options:
    If students have access to National Restaurant Association, Foundations of Restaurant Management and Culinary Arts, Level One:

    • Distribute study guide for Foundations 1 textbook. As a class, open the textbook and have the students preview the sections.
    • Students may use the information found in Foundations Level 1 (red book) chapter 10, and in Professional Cooking (green book) as they complete this Setting the Tone activity.
    • Have students complete study questions for Chapter 10 Section 3 of:
      National Restaurant Association, Foundations of Restaurant Management and Culinary Arts – Level 1, Prentice Hall, New York, ©2011, Chapter 10 Section 3 – Serving Your Guests.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • providing opportunity to repeat instructions
    • providing written instructions
    • allowing students to work with a peer

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Divide class into subgroups of 3 or 4 students.Assign Table Setting Project, each group will set a formal place setting working together as a team. Place setting will be assessed with Rubric for Thematic Table Setting Assignment (see All Lesson Attachments tab).

    Review each component of Rubric for Thematic Table Setting Assignment (see All Lessons Attachments tab) so students comprehend what is expected.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • participating in a small group
    • providing a study guide
    • using study aids/manipulatives (flipbook creation)

  • Lesson Closure

    Review terms, definitions, and objectives.

    Exit Discussions or Exit Questions

    1. Why is it important to know how to properly serve customers?
    2. Compare and Contrast three serving styles – French, Russian, and English in the Venn Diagram Types of Service (see All Lessons Attachments tab).
    3. What is the difference between the responsibilities of a head waiter and a captain?
    4. What tasks are performed on the right side of the customer, and what tasks are performed on the left side of the customer?

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Thematic Table setting Project will be assessed with Rubric for Thematic Table Setting Assignment.

    Additional Assessment Option:

    Distribute Setting the Tone Quiz over table setting and service (see All Lessons Attachments tab)

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • extending time for quiz
    • working with a peer on project

  • References/Resources

    Textbooks:

    • National Restaurant Association, Foundations of Restaurant Management and Culinary Arts – Level 1, Prentice Hall, New York, ©2011, Chapter 10 Section 3 – Serving Your Guests.
    • Glisslen, Wayne, Professional Cooking, John Wiley & Sons inc., New Jersey, © 2011

    Websites:

  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • Word Wall
    • Share in cooperative groups (anticipatory set, flipbook, thematic table authentic assessment)
    • Use oral language for formal and informal purposes
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Recommended Strategies

    Reading Strategies

    Food In the News (Current Events)

    • Select one day a week where the students report information they found in the newspaper, internet and magazines, as it relates to food. Student will give a brief oral summary of their article to the class and will insert the article in their journals and include their written summary.

  • Quotes

    One should eat to live, not live to eat.
    -Moliere

    Sandwiches are wonderful. You don’t need a spoon or a plate!
    -Paul Lynde

    Three things are needed for a good life, good friends, good food, and good song.
    -Jacob Zebehazy

    We provide food that customers love, day after day after day. People just want more of it.
    -Ray Kroc

  • Multimedia/Visual Strategies

    PowerPoint™:

    • Setting the Tone: Table Setting, Dining, and Service

    Other Videos:

    YouTube:

    • Isaac Mizrahi’s Table Setting Tip
      Uploaded by epicuriousdotcom on Nov 26, 2007
      Isaac Mizrahi shows us the wineglasses, tablemats, and dishes that make his dining table special. Plus, what inspired his love of cooking.
      http://youtu.be/8Fehv6-kXbQ

    Files for downloading:

  • Graphic Organizers/Handout

    Graphic Organizers:

    • Setting the Tone – Notes
    • Venn diagram on types of service

    Handouts:

    • Setting the Tone Flipchart Instructions
    • Rubric for Thematic Table Setting
    • Setting the Tone Quiz

    Files for downloading:

  • Writing Strategies

    Journal Entries:

    • Think of a time you were at a restaurant and the service was either good or bad. Explain the situation.
    • Write how a basic table setting should be set – no drawings

    Writing Strategy:

    • Write a descriptive paragraph for your thematic table setting project.
  • Communication 90 Second Speech Topics

    • My best dining out experience…
    • My worst dining out experience….
    • Our holiday table: Describe your family’s traditional holiday dinner.menu, table setting and decorations.
  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    Create a web quest that focuses on table setting and buffet table setting. Have students plan a buffet, select what food would be served, and how it will be served, and a diagram of the buffet table and a written description of the decorations and set up.

  • Family/Community Connection

    Invite caterers or event planners to speak on thematic table setting or effective table/buffet setting.
    Students plan and serve a dinner for their family that includes a basic table setting and decorating. They will take pictures of their table.

  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career, Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)
    http://www.texasfccla.org

    Teacher Appreciation Project

    Plan a staff appreciation luncheon. Select a theme and set the tables accordingly and use the newly acquired waiting table skills to serve the staff lunch.

  • Service Learning Projects

    Work with a local agency such as a women’s shelter to help with serving a dinner and bring in supplies (that the class has on hand) to make attractive table settings and provide service for a special dinner for the clients.

No Comments

Leave A Reply