Setting Tables with Service and Style

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Hospitality and Tourism

    Course : Restaurant Management

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (2) The student uses verbal and nonverbal communication skills to create, express, and interpret information for providing a positive experience for guests and employees. The student is expected to:
      • (A) develop, deliver, and critique presentations
      • (E) apply active listening skills to obtain and clarify information
    • (5) The student understands roles within teams, work units, departments, organizations, and the larger environment of the restaurant industry. The student is expected to:
      • (C) differentiate between various styles of restaurant services such as table, buffet, and fast food
      • (D) illustrate various place settings using proper placement of dining utensils
      • (E) demonstrate the proper service techniques in food service operations
    • (9) The student demonstrates an understanding that personal success depends on personal effort. The student is expected to:
      • (E) follow directions and procedures independently
    • (12) The student understands the use of technical knowledge and skills required to pursue careers in the restaurant industry, including knowledge of design, operation, and maintenance of technological systems. The student is expected to:
      • (A) define job-specific technical vocabulary
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • classify local restaurant styles in the area
    • identify tableware for proper placement during different meals
    • enhance table settings with beautiful, intricate napkin folds
    • display service techniques in a mock setting
  • Rationale

    Script:

    (Updated 11/26/2013) Learning and practicing service skills (how to greet and serve customers), as well as table setting knowledge and knowing how to create beautiful, intricate napkin folds will assist you in obtaining and retaining a job/career in the food service industry.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Four 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Centerpiece: Adds beauty and interest to a table

    Dinnerware: Includes plates, cups, saucers and bowls

    Flatware: The term used to refer to knives, forks and spoons

    Food court: Several quick-service restaurants gathered into a single area, such as found in a mall or shopping center

    Glassware: Refers to those items such as juice, water and iced beverages glasses

    Place setting: The dinnerware or flatware that one person would need

    Server: The service staff member who has the most contact with customers

    Service plate: A large elaborate plate used to indicate a place at a table and to serve as an underplate during the first courses

    Table Linens: Refers to tablecloth, placemats and napkins

    Tableside: At the table

    Tableware: Refers to dinnerware, flatware and glassware

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for multimedia presentations
    • light projector (Elmo)

    Supplies:

    • dishware
    • flatware
    • glassware
    • iron
    • ironing board
    • linens (tablecloths, napkins, placemats)
    • starch (for napkin folding)
    • tray
    • tray stand
    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Anticipatory Set

    Before class begins:

    Preset two table settings.
    One table will show a lunch table setting and the other a dinner table setting.
    If two tables are not available, set the lunch and dinner style settings across from each other. The purpose is to show student’s a visual of the differences in the styles of place settings. The lunch setting will have less flatware, dinner and glassware. The napkin folds for the lunch table setting should be with fewer folds and placed to the left of the plate. The dinner napkin should have additional folds and placed on top of the dinner plate for an attractive dinner appeal.
    Be prepared to discuss the breakfast table setting as well.

    Allow students to observe the table(s) and ask them the following questions:

    • What do you notice about each place setting?
    • What type of atmosphere would each of the place settings be proper in?
    • Why would it be important to know how to set a table properly according to what time of day the meal is being served?

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce objectives, terms and definitions.

    Distribute graphic organizer Dining Today (see All Lesson Attachment tab). Allow students to brainstorm the names of local dining establishments and fill in the appropriate circles.

    Introduce slide presentation Setting Tables with Service and Style (see All Lesson Attachment tab).
    Discuss with students the different types of local dining and meal service.

    View videos:

    • Fancy Napkin Folding with Jonathon Stewart
      Easy napkin folding techniques for flair that’s sure to impress
      http://video.about.com/interiordec/Fancy-Napkin-Folding.htm
    • How to Set a Dinner Table
      Figuring out which fork to use for which course can be confusing enough, but having to actually set those forks—and everything else on the table? A recipe for disaster… or a chance to strut your etiquette stuff.
      http://youtu.be/PcTR1B06e-g
    • Lotus Napkin Fold
      How to shape a napkin into a lotus fold
      http://youtu.be/0sMr8h6ygs8
    • Restaurant Business: How to Wait Tables
      Waiting tables is a multi-tasking endeavor, as a waiter must greet the customers, take drink orders, seat other tables, serve the food properly and maintain an effortless attitude. Understand the job of a professional waiter with information from an executive chef in this free video on the restaurant business.
      http://youtu.be/TbFVPYD-Kfs
    • Setting a Formal Table Setting
      The Basics of Setting a Formal Table
      http://youtu.be/qKSHmmNk_5Y

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • checking for understanding
    • printed PowerPoint™ slides
    • extra time needed
    • working with a partner

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Distribute handout Formal Dinner Place Setting (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Refer to the lunch and dinner tablesettings and assist students as they identify each article.

    Describe a menu for breakfast, lunch and dinner and have students illustrate each of the table settings on the back of the handout.

    Working with partners, allow students to practice the table settings using the actual dinnerware.

    Demonstrate the napkin folding techniques and allow students to practice several folds using an iron and iron board. Be sure to emphasize safety to prevent burns. Students may practice folding napkins using only water sprayed on the napkin, saving the starch for the final grade.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • extra time to complete assignment
    • shorter assignment (fewer napkin folds)
    • group work
    • checking for understanding

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Distribute Rubric for Napkin Folds (3), Table Setting, and Service (see All Lesson Attachment tab) and review with students for understanding of expectations.

    Students will work independently or with a partner to practice table settings, serving styles and napkin folding in preparation for a summative grade. At the end of each class period, have students or groups paraphrase each activity and if additional practice is needed.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • extra time to complete assignment
    • shorter assignment (fewer napkin folds)
    • group work
    • checking for understanding

  • Lesson Closure

    Review objectives, terms, and definitions.

    Before each class ends, check for understanding by asking students to paraphrase what they learned.
    Ask the students to give examples of:

    • styles of restaurant service
    • types of meal service
    • table settings for a breakfast, lunch and dinner menu
    • intricate napkin folds

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Students will be assessed with a rubric.

    Students will also write a one-page reflection paper on how they can use table setting, service and napkin folds in the future.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • extended time
    • grade according to work completed
    • providing praise and encouragement
    • peer assistance

  • References/Resources

    Textbook:

    • Culinary essentials. (2010). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw Hill.

    Video:

    Website:

    YouTube™:

    • How to Set a Dinner Table
      Figuring out which fork to use for which course can be confusing enough, but having to actually set those forks—and everything else on the table? A recipe for disaster… or a chance to strut your etiquette stuff.
      http://youtu.be/PcTR1B06e-g
    • Lotus Napkin Fold
      How to shape a napkin into a lotus fold
      http://youtu.be/0sMr8h6ygs8
    • Restaurant Business: How to Wait Tables
      Waiting tables is a multi-tasking endeavor, as a waiter must greet the customers, take drink orders, seat other tables, serve the food properly and maintain an effortless attitude. Understand the job of a professional waiter with information from an executive chef in this free video on the restaurant business.
      http://youtu.be/TbFVPYD-Kfs
    • Setting a Formal Table Setting
      The Basics of Setting a Formal Table
      http://youtu.be/qKSHmmNk_5Y
  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • picture word wall
    • word wall
    • http://dictionary.com for pronunciation and meaning of tableware, table service, and napkin folding terms
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Recommended Strategies

    Reading Strategies

    Students may read article from the Art Institute about Restaurant Service:

    Reading strategy:
    Encourage students to “visualize” as they read. Many students are visual learners and will benefit from making sketches or diagrams on scrap paper as they read. Providing students with graphic organizers to help them organize their thoughts is also helpful.

  • Quotes

    Historically in restaurants, the service staff is awarded significantly higher wages than cooks and other staff who prepare the food on which a restaurant’s reputation is based. The gap in pay is so great that it is becoming increasingly difficult for young cooks to pursue their passion at the rate of pay restaurants are able to afford.
    -Thomas Keller

    Friends and good manners will carry you where money won’t go.
    -Margaret Walker

    Good manners sometimes means simply putting up with other people’s bad manners.
    -H. Jackson Brown

    The test of good manners is to be patient with the bad ones.
    -Solomon Ibn Gabirol

  • Multimedia/Visual Strategies

    PowerPoint™:

    • Setting Tables with Service and Style
    • Presentation Notes – Setting Tables with Service and Style

    Technology:

    Files for downloading:

  • Graphic Organizers/Handout

    Graphic Organizer:

    • Dining Today
    • Formal Dinner Place Setting
    • Formal Dinner Place Setting (Key)

    Handouts:

    • Rubric for Napkin Folds, Table Setting, and Service

    Files for downloading:

  • Writing Strategies

    Journal Entries:

    • Describe your favorite restaurant and why you like it.
    • Describe your worst experience in a restaurant.
    • What type of table service would you use if you catered a banquet? (banquet)
    • Why is properly setting a table important for an established restaurant that is known for formal service? (Customers may be disappointed if the set table is missing pieces of tableware, because they are paying extra for the formal service.)

    Writing Strategy:

    • RAFT (Role/Audience/Format/Topic) writing strategy:
      • Role: dissatisfied customer
      • Audience: restaurant manager
      • Format: letter
      • Topic: pleasant atmosphere, creative table setting, excellent food, but terrible service on a busy Saturday night

    As an owner of a restaurant, you received a complaint letter about lack of proper service from the waiter. How will you respond? Write an apologetic letter to the customer based on what you have learned in class about table service which requires good customer service skills.

  • Communication 90 Second Speech Topics

    • How does the amount of money you pay at a restaurant reflect the type of table service that you receive?
    • Why is it important to know correct table settings in business? At home?
    • My favorite napkin fold is. . . Why?
  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    Assign students to create comparison charts of the different types of table service and table settings.

    Hospitality and Tourism Restaurant Management Writing Prompts

    Think about various styles of restaurant services. Write an essay in which you differentiate between various styles of restaurant style services such as table, buffet and fast food. (9th and 10th grade expository writing)

  • Family/Community Connection

    Have students interview a waiter or waitress at a restaurant that is known for full service. Ask questions as to how and why waiting tables is a multi-task endeavor that requires great customer service skills.

  • CTSO connection

    SkillsUSA

    http://www.skillsusa.org/

    • Restaurant Service (formerly Food and Beverage Service) – Contestants are tested on skills required in the “front of the house” of a fine restaurant. The focus is on guest service and guest relations in the dining room including: table set up; greeting guests; reservations procedures; presentation of menus; description of food, drinks, soups and specials of the day; taking orders; serving each course and clearing the table after each course; and preparation and presentation of the check and closing remarks. Contestants are judged on personal appearance, tableside manner, professionalism, ease with guests, courtesy, general knowledge and technical and verbal skills.
  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to the lesson. For information on service learning see:
    http://ysa.org/

    Possible idea:
    The students could organize a “Help the Hungry By Dining Out.” Any restaurant in the school community area could be contacted to see if they would donate a percentage of their sales on a certain date. The students could assist the restaurant by taking orders or clearing tables. The students would advertise the event at school to encourage students, families and faculty/staff to dine to “Help the Hungry.”

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