Selection and Care of Clothing: Part II

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (1 votes, average: 1.00 out of 5)
Loading...
FavoriteLoadingAdd to favorites
  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Human Services

    Course : Principles of Human Services

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (1) The student demonstrates personal characteristics for success in high-skill, high-wage or high-demand careers. The student is expected to:
      • (C) describe personal management skills needed for productivity such as time and energy
      • (I) apply clothing selection, maintenance and repair skills to enhance career opportunities
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • utilize skills and tools to maintain and repair their clothing
    • demonstrate procedures for caring and for repairing clothes
    • recognize that the use of personal resources such as skills, time and energy can save them money
  • Rationale

    According to StatisticBrain.com, American families spend an annual amount of 157.8 billion dollars on teens for food, apparel, personal-care items and entertainment. Do you know how much money is spent yearly on your clothes? After spending so much on clothes, it is important to keep them looking their best as long as possible. As we begin this lesson, I want you to start thinking of your clothes as the equivalent of money.

    If you buy a coat for $100.00 dollars and never wear it, it’s like having a $100.00 bill hanging in your closet. If you wear it twice, it cost $50.00 per use. What if you wore it everyday during the winter months for five years? Would you have gotten your money’s worth out of the coat? How much would it have cost per use – pennies?

    Money is a resource that you will work hard for throughout your career. Careful management of this resource will allow you to live the lifestyle you choose. In this lesson I will teach you clothing maintenance and repair skills that you will be able to utilize for the rest of your life. These skills and a little of your time and energy will allow you to save money instead of waste it!

    Are any of the clothes you currently own in a drawer or basket, not being worn because a button fell off or the hem came undone? Possessing clothing in need of repair is the same as wasting money. Do you know how to properly maintain your clothes? I guarantee you they will look better if maintenance and repairs are done on a regular basis. As you enter the world of work, it is important to look your best.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Five 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Backstitch: A stitch sewn one stitch length backward on the front side and two stitch lengths forward on the reverse side to form a solid line of stitching on both sides

    Basting/running stitch: The running stitch is the simplest, quickest and most basic of all the hand stitches and is used to ease, gather, mend, baste and sew seams that are not subject to strain

    Blanket stitch: Can be used to repair a buttonhole if stitches are spaced close together, used to reinforce the edge of thick material

    Blind stitch: Appropriate for hemming a garment, stitches are only visible on the underside of a garment

    Hem: The edge of a piece of cloth or clothing that has been turned under and sewn

    Maintenance: The process of maintaining or preserving someone or something, or the state of being maintained

    Seam: A line along which two pieces of fabric are sewn together in a garment or other article

    Self-discipline: Making yourself do things when you should, even if you do not want to do them

    Success: Favorable or desired outcome

    Wardrobe: Includes all the clothes you have to wear, including accessories

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for PowerPoint™ presentation
    • computers with Internet access (be sure to follow district guidelines)

    Materials:

    • sewing equipment such as:
      buttons (shankless)
      fabric swatches
      hand needles
      pin cushions
      shears
      straight pins
      thimbles
      thread
      threader

    Supplies:

    • items of clothing needing various repairs
      undone hem on a dress or skirt
      missing button
      torn seam on a shirt

    Additional Instructions

    • Become familiar with PowerPoint™, handouts and activities.
    • This lesson is divided into several mini-lessons to make it easier to present the information on multiple days. By dividing the information into mini-lessons, it will be easier for students to understand the information.
    • Use poster board, cardstock or a piece of cardboard and the Button Template (see All Lesson Attachments tab) to cut out sample button. Students will be demonstrating how to sew on a button during. If you have a building trades course at school, you may opt to ask the instructor to make a large button out of wood.
    • Become familiar with the proper sewing techniques shown in all the videos. You may opt to have samples of each type of stitch sewn beforehand for students to view.
    • Each student will need six of fabric swatches approximately 5” x 3” in size on which to practice various hand stitches. You may have students cut the fabric to size prior to the Guided Practice activities.

    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Anticipatory Set

    Prior to class:

    Display as many of the lesson-related supplies (see Materials or Specialized Equipment Needed) as you have available on a table in front of the room as well as various clothing items in need of repair – missing or loose buttons, hems coming loose and seams coming undone.

    Before class begins:

    Instruct students to carefully view items on the table and displayed through out the classroom.

    Suggested questions to spark classroom discussion:

    • Are all of the clothes in your closet in good condition? If not, what is wrong with them?
    • How many of your clothing items are missing or have loose buttons? Do you know how to correctly sew on a button?
    • Do any of your clothes have hems that have come undone?
    • What are some “creative” ways you have attempted to repair an item of clothing – use of tape? a stapler?
    • Do you waste time and energy trying to finding something to wear?
    • What tools are you aware of that can be used to repair and maintain your clothes?
    • As an employer, what would you expect the condition of your employees’ clothing to look like?

    In this lesson, you are going to learn several hand sewing techniques that will help you to fix clothing in need of repair. Remember, as you enter the world of work, it is important to present a good impression, and having your clothes well-maintained will help with your personal appearance.

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Note to teacher:

    Prior to beginning this lesson, review lesson contents and slide presentations for Selection and Care of Clothing: Part I and Selection and Care of Clothing: Part II. This will assist you in determining what information to focus on and how much class time you have to utilize on the lesson TEKS/student expectations.

    Introduce lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Distribute Notes for Selection and Care of Clothing: Part II (see All Lessons Attachment tab). Students will be expected to take notes while viewing the slide presentation. Students will view Selection and Care of Clothing Part II (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Teacher will determine the notes to be recorded by students. Allow plenty of time for questions and discussion.

    Videos and websites included in the PowerPoint™ presentation:

    • How to Manage Your Time Effectively
      It’s important that you develop effective strategies for managing your time to balance the conflicting demands of time for study, leisure, earning money and job hunting.
      http://www.kent.ac.uk/careers/sk/time.htm
    • How to Sew a Torn Seam
      Have you ever wanted to get good at sewing? Well look no further than this informative video on How to Sew a Torn Seam.
      http://youtu.be/mUE_ATvXIdA
    • How to Tie a Knot in Thread : Sewing for Beginners
      This is a quick and easy trick for tying a knot in your thread. You’re less likely to have your thread go all the way through your fabric when starting your hand stitch.
      http://youtu.be/PowkA9Bojlo
    • Sewing Tip #2: How To Hand Sew A Button
      Learn how to hand sew a button on a shirt or garment with step-by-step instructions. 
      http://youtu.be/rQRq—7InTE

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • providing students with a copy of the notes or a fill-in-the-blank note sheet to follow along with instruction
    • pairing up students with elbow partners who can assist them with verbal and written responses to the lesson

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Under your guidance and supervision, students will practice select sewing techniques. compile the components of their individual Looking Your Best: Clothing Repair Techniques Booklet by incorporating all the hand sewing techniques you have taught them during this lesson. Determine how much time you can utilize addressing this activity, then determine which techniques you want students to demonstrate.

    Determine which hand sewing techniques you want them to demonstrate. Techniques may include but are not limited:

    • sewing a basting/running stitch that can be used to repair a seam
    • sewing a sample blind-stitch that can be used to hem a garment
    • sewing on a two-hole button
    • sewing on a four-hole button
    • sewing on a button with a shank
    • sewing on a patch/using an iron on patch to repair a rip

    Distribute and instruct students to complete the Basic Sewing Equipment handout (see All Lesson Attachments tab) as you provide display items and provide appropriate information.

    Example #1 – Have students view video on threading a needle correctly. Model threading a needle and knotting the end correctly and then allow ALL students in the class to thread a needle and knot the end correctly.

    Once everyone has mastered this task, have everyone sew a basting/running stitch on a swatch of fabric and correctly tie a knot at the end. Continuously guide, monitor and check for understanding.

    The students will practice threading a needle, making a knot at the end of the thread and sewing a basting stitch. Distribute Hand Sewing Techniques and Basting Stitch (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Instruct the students to place this handout and the sample basting stitch in their Looking Your Best: Clothing Repair Techniques Booklet files after the sample stitch has been assessed.

    Follow a similar procedure for all other sewing techniques.

    When all pages/components of their booklet have been completed, provide students with three additional sheets of paper. The first page will be used as the cover for their booklet. Allow students to be creative as they decorate their cover page. Instruct them to make sure they add Created by: and their name, class period and date. The second page will be for their table of contents and the third page will be the back cover of their booklet, which also also be decorated if time permits.

    —-

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • allowing extra time for assignments
    • providing positive feedback
    • providing copies of the slide presentation

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Before class begins:

    • Determine how much time you can utilize addressing this activity.
    • Determine which hand sewing techniques you want students to provide sample of in their booklets.

    Repair techniques may include but are not limited to:

    • sewing a basting/running stitch that can be used to repair a seam
    • sewing a sample blind-stitch that can be used to hem a garment
    • sewing on a two-hole button
    • sewing on a four-hole button
    • sewing on a button with a shank
    • sewing on a patch/using an iron on patch to repair a rip
    • Determine if each sample will be assessed individually (optional corresponding rubrics have been provided – see All Lesson Attachments tab) or if only overall completed booklet will be assess with Rubric for Looking Your Best: Clothing Repair Booklet (see all Lesson Attachments tab).
    • Locate solid fabric that can be cut into 3” x 5” swatches.

    —-

    Distribute Looking Your Best: Clothing Repair Techniques Booklet (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout. Inform students that they will be compiling a booklet of sample sewing/repair techniques they previously learned and practiced. Distribute Rubric for Looking Your Best: Clothing Repair Techniques Booklet (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and thoroughly review each component so that the students understand what is expected.

    Provide solid fabric that can be cut into approximately 3” x 5” swatches. Also provide sheets or half sheets of paper that can be used to attach their samples onto. Inform students that all samples must be labeled.

    Under your guidance and supervision, students will use their fabric swatches and provide examples of sewing/repair techniques you have taught them. Instruct students to show you their completed samples prior to placing in booklet. This way you can determine if they need to re-do the sample.

    When all pages of their booklet have been completed, provide students with three additional sheets/half sheets of paper. The first page will be used as the cover for their booklet. Allow students to be creative as they decorate their cover page. Instruct them to make sure they add Created by: and their name, class period and date. The second page will be for their table of contents and the third page will be the back cover of their booklet, which also also be decorated if time permits.

    —-

    Teacher note

    You will have students that complete their work much faster than others. Have these students guide students that be struggling or that my have fallen behind due to absences. Also allow these students to earn extra credit by bringing personal clothing items to school and repairing them in class. Extra credit can be added in at the bottom of the rubric.

    Collect booklets for assessment.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • creating poster project by working with a peer tutor or in a small group setting.
    • do not grade for spelling
    • allowing note-taker use

  • Lesson Closure

    Review terms, definitions and lesson objectives.

    Distribute the 3-2-1 Strategies for Care of Clothing Success (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout. The student will write three key ideas from what he or she has just learned, two ideas he or she would like to learn more about, and one concept or skill he or she has mastered

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Assess booklets with appropriate rubric.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • providing extra time for assignments
    • providing copies of the slide presentation for study

  • References/Resources

    Images:

    • Microsoft Clip Art: Used with permission from Microsoft™.
    • Photos obtained through a license with Shutterstock.com™.

    Textbooks:

    • Johnson, L. (2004). Strengthening family & self. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Wilcox.

    Websites:

    • How to Manage Your Time Effectively
      It’s important that you develop effective strategies for managing your time to balance the conflicting demands of time for study, leisure, earning money and job hunting.
      http://www.kent.ac.uk/careers/sk/time.htm
    • Sewing.org
      Free sewing and craft projects, learn to sew, guidelines articles, charitable projects, bridal, children and more.
      http://www.sewing.org

    YouTube™:

    • How to Sew a Torn Seam
      Have you ever wanted to get good at sewing? Well look no further than this informative video on How to Sew a Torn Seam.
      http://youtu.be/mUE_ATvXIdA
    • How to Tie a Knot in Thread : Sewing for Beginners
      This is a quick and easy trick for tying a knot in your thread. You’re less likely to have your thread go all the way through your fabric when starting your hand stitch.
      http://youtu.be/PowkA9Bojlo
    • Sewing Tip #2: How To Hand Sew A Button
      Learn how to hand sew a button on a shirt with step-by-step instructions. 
      http://youtu.be/rQRq—7InTE
  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • Ask students to repeat your instructions back to you to be sure they know what is expected of them.
    • Discuss vocabulary in detail, making sure students understand before moving on.
    • Use graphic organizers and visuals to help explain the lesson.
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Recommended Strategies

    Reading Strategies

    Current Events:
    Assign students to read about the maintenance and repair of clothes. Information can be found in newspaper articles, magazines, journals and online print.
    Suggestions:

    Reading strategy:

    Encourage students to “visualize” as they read. Many students are visual learners and will benefit from making sketches or diagrams on scrap paper as they read. Providing students with graphic organizers to help them organize their thoughts is also helpful.

  • Quotes

    I want to make clothes that people wear, not styles that will make a big splash on the runway.
    -Oscar de la Renta

    The beauty of a woman is not in the clothes she wears, the figure that she carries or the way she combs her hair.
    -Audrey Hepburn

    I think fashion is a lot of fun. I love clothes. More than fashion or brand labels, I love design. I love the thought that people put into clothes. I love when clothes make cultural statements and I think personal style is really cool. I also freely recognize that fashion should be a hobby.
    -Anne Hathaway

    I remember a specific moment, watching my grandmother hang the clothes on the line, and her saying to me, “You are going to have to learn to do this,” and me being in that space of awareness and knowing that my life would not be the same as my grandmother’s life.
    -Oprah Winfrey

    Life stands before me like an eternal spring with new and brilliant clothes.
    -Carl Friedrich Gauss

  • Multimedia/Visual Strategies

    PowerPoint™:

    • Selection and Care of Clothing: Part II
    • Presentation Notes for Selection and Care of Clothing: Part II

    Technology:

    Free iPad App:
    ThredUp – Buy and Sell Clothing for Women and Children
    https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/thredup-buy-sell-clothing/id499725337?mt=8

    TedxTalk:

    • Richard St. John: “Success is a continuous journey”
      Richard St. John reminds us that success is not a one-way street, but a constant journey. He uses the story of his business’ rise and fall to illustrate a valuable lesson — when we stop trying, we fail.
      http://youtu.be/CgNx9Bgac1I

    YouTube™:

    • How to Sew a Torn Seam
      Have you ever wanted to get good at sewing? Well look no further than this informative video on How to Sew a Torn Seam.
      http://youtu.be/mUE_ATvXIdA
    • How to Tie a Knot in Thread : Sewing for Beginners
      This is a quick and easy trick for tying a knot in your thread. You’re less likely to have your thread go all the way through your fabric when starting your hand stitch.
      http://youtu.be/PowkA9Bojlo
    • Sewing Tip #2: How To Hand Sew A Button
      Learn how to hand sew a button on a shirt or any garment with step-by-step instructions. 
      http://youtu.be/rQRq—7InTE

    • Files for downloading:
  • Graphic Organizers/Handout

    Graphic Organizers:

    • Notes for Selection and Care of Clothing: Part II

    Handouts:

    • 3-2-1 Strategies for Care of Clothing Success
    • Basic Sewing Equipment
    • Button Template
    • How to Sew a Backstitch and Buttonhole/Blanket Stitch
    • How to Sew on a Button
    • How to Sew a Hem
    • Looking Your Best Portfolio: Clothing Care Techniques
    • Optional Extra Credit
    • Rubric for Looking Your Best Portfolio: Clothing Care Techniques

    • Files for downloading:
  • Writing Strategies

    Journal Entries:

    • Hand sewing techniques are important to know because ____________________.
    • The basting stitch is used for __________________.
    • The backstitch is used for _____________________.
    • The buttonhole stitch is used for __________________________.
    • Proper maintenance and repair of clothes should done on a regular basis because ________________.
    • The correct steps for sewing on a button include ___________________________.
    • Personal management skills (or lack thereof) can make or break a career by ______________________.

    Writing Strategy:

    RAFT Writing Strategy
    Role- Peer educator
    Audience-Peers
    Format- Poster
    Topic- What you should know about maintenance and repair of clothes

  • Communication 90 Second Speech Topics

    • The steps to correctly sew on a button are _____________________________.
    • Clothing care is important because ____________________________________.
    • My personal management skills which I will practice at the workplace include _______________.
  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    Hold a repair, recycle or redesign day. Ask students to bring clothing from home which needs repair, can be redesigned into something else or needs to be recycled.

    TED Talks:

    TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks videos and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event.

    The video below is related to this lesson. Allow students to view the video and lead a discussion concerning the TED Talk.

    • Richard St. John: “Success is a continuous journey”
      Richard St. John reminds us that success is not a one-way street, but a constant journey. He uses the story of his business’ rise and fall to illustrate a valuable lesson — when we stop trying, we fail.
      http://youtu.be/CgNx9Bgac1I
  • Family/Community Connection

    Guest speaker options include:

    • Manager of a fabric store, seamstress or professional tailor
    • Manager of Human Resources of a local company

    Students have the opportunity to repair articles of clothing at home. Refer to the Optional Extra Credit (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout.

  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)
    hppt://texasfccla.org

    STAR Events:

    Recycle and Redesign – Recycle and Redesign is an individual event that recognizes participants who apply
    recycling and redesign skills learned in Family and Consumer Sciences courses and create a display using a sample of their skills.

  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to the lesson. For additional information on service learning see
    http://www.ysa.org

    Organize a clothing drive for the needy. Wash and repair clothes which need cleaning and repair. Donate the articles of clothing to a local organization.

No Comments

Leave A Reply