School-Aged Children

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Education and Training

    Course : Human Growth and Development

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (5) The student understands the development of children ages six through ten years. The student is expected to:
      • (A) analyze the physical, emotional, social, and cognitive development of children in the early to middle school childhood stage of development
      • (C) discuss the influences of the family and society on children in the early to middle school childhood stage of development
      • (D) summarize strategies for optimizing the development of children in the early to middle school childhood stage of development, including those with special needs;
      • (E) determine techniques that promote the health and safety of children in the early to middle school childhood stage of development
      • (F) determine developmentally appropriate guidance techniques for children in the early to middle school childhood stage of development
    • (11) The student understands the skills necessary for career preparation. The student is expected to:
      • (C) practice human-relation skills
      • (D) demonstrate effective verbal, non-verbal, written, and electronic communication skills
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • observe and analyze the physical, emotional, social, and cognitive development of school-aged children
    • create an online presentation that describes development of children aged six to ten years and predicts how that information is useful when teaching the school-aged child
  • Rationale

    Script:

    During this unit, you will learn how to best teach children aged six to ten years by examining their physical, emotional, social, and cognitive development. In this unit, you will also apply your knowledge of how to best teach the school-aged child by creating an online presentation about caring for and teaching children aged six to ten years.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Five 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Body Image: Refers to how a person thinks his or her body looks.

    Conformity: Being like one another

    Gender Identity: The awareness of being male or female

    Growth Spurt: Occurs when a child grows very rapidly in a short period of time

    Moral Development: The process of learning to base one’s behavior on beliefs about what is right and wrong

    MyPyramid: A guide for healthful eating and active living that was developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)

    Peer Learning: A learning in which students interact with one another

    Peer Pressure: A social group’s influence on the way individuals behave

    Puberty: The set of changes that result in a physically mature body that is able to reproduce

    Sense of Self: Your idea of who you are, based on your emotions, personality, and the ways you perceive the world

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for PowerPoint™ presentation
    • presenter/remote
    • computer lab with Internet access
    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Anticipatory Set

    Before class begins:

    Have faculty and staff members bring in pictures of themselves ranging in age between six and ten years. Tell the faculty and staff members not to show other students their picture.

    Hang the pictures of the faculty and staff members around the classroom and assign each picture a number.

    Have students look through the gallery of pictures and write down their guess for the teacher and teacher’s age in each picture. After each student has had a chance to guess each teacher’s picture and age, reveal the answers to the class.

    Ask the following questions:

    • Was it easy or hard to guess each photograph?
    • What characteristics in the photographs lead you to believe it as a certain teacher?
    • How has tried to teach something to a child between the ages of six and ten before?
    • Who would like to describe the time when they taught a child between the ages of six and ten?
  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce lesson objectives, terms, and definitions.

    Distribute graphic organizer, KWHL Chart – School-Aged Children, (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and have students fill out the first three columns of the chart. Ask students to write down what they already know about the topic in the first column, what they want to learn about the topic in the second column and how they can locate more information about the topic in the third column. The last column will be completed during lesson closure.

    Distribute handout, Notetaking – School-Aged Children, (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and introduce PowerPoint™, School-Aged Children (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Students will be expected to take notes while viewing the slide presentation.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • check for understanding
    • providing assistance with note-taking
    • providing extra time for oral response
    • frequent feedback

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce handout Observations of the School-Aged Child (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Inform students that they will each be responsible for completing an observation sheet on a school-aged child. This can be assigned as a homework assignment or prior arrangements can be with a local daycare/preschool facility.

    Inform students that they will be practicing how to accurately use an observation sheet. Have students view a video of preschool aged child(ren). As a class, practice recording data on the observation sheet.

    After the guided practice use of the observation sheet, distribute a new copy of, Observations of the School-Aged Child (see All Lesson Attachments tab) to each student. Inform them that the official observations must be performed individually. explain that information will be expected to be retrieved only from reliable sources. Provide due date.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • check for understanding
    • providing extra time for oral response
    • frequent feedback
    • providing peer tutoring
    • reducing length of assignment
  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Distribute handout, School-Aged Children Project (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Inform students that they will be creating an electronic presentation entitled “School-Aged Children”, preferably utilizing sites.google.com. Alternative electronic presentation options include PowerPoint™ and http://prezi.com. For the purposes of this lesson, a rubric for a Google™ Site presentation has been included, however you may develop a different rubric, see http://cte.sfasu.edu/classroom-essentials/rubrics/.

    Online beginner’s tutorials for Google™ Site presentation may be found at https://support.google.com/sites/bin/answer.pyhl=en&answer=153098&topic=23216&rd=1.
    Inform students that the assignment may be prepared individually or with a partner. Explain that information will be expected to be retrieved only from reliable sources. Provide students with project rubric and thoroughly review all components so that students understand how their projects will be accessed. Provide due date within five class periods.

    Students must present summative information in an oral presentation. Analyze rubrics for each oral presentation (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that students are aware of assessment procedures.

    Assist students with research and Google site presentation. Keep students focused and on task.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • check for understanding
    • providing extra time for oral response
    • frequent feedback
    • providing peer tutoring
    • reducing length of assignment
    • assisting student in gathering information
    • providing praise and encouragement
  • Lesson Closure

    Review lesson objectives, terms, and definitions.

    Students will make project presentations to class.

    Complete graphic organizer, KWHL Chart – School-Aged Children, (see All Lesson Attachments tab) to analyze what they have learned about caring for school-aged children.

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Student oral presentations will be assessed with appropriate rubric provided during Guided Practice. Student observations will be assessed based upon completion of observation handout.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • grading according to work done
    • providing praise and encouragement
  • References/Resources

    Textbooks:

    • Brisbane, H. (2010). The developing child. Columbus, OH: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.

    Websites:

    • Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service
      Family and Consumer Science
      The AgriLife Extension website provides teachers with useful information about educating children.
      http://fcs.tamu.edu/
  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • word wall
    • draw visual representations of terms on word wall
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

  • Recommended Strategies

    Reading Strategies

    Promote the use of the pre-reading strategy prediction.

    Print, distribute and discuss Friends are important: Tips for parents from http://www.healthychildren.org/English/ages-stages/gradeschool/pages/Friends-Are-Important-Tips-for-Parents.aspx.

  • Quotes

    Physical growth that occurs during this time is more rapid than any other time since infancy. Besides growing bigger and taller, the maturing child begins to develop bodily characteristics that distinguish the male and female adult.
    -Virginia K. Molgaard

    During the latency years, American children need experiences that promote academic talents, a sense of responsibility, and most important, a belief that they can attain the goals valued by self and community. They need reassurance that these goals are attainable.
    -Jerome Kagan

    Immaturity is the incapacity to use one’s intelligence without the guidance of another.
    -Immanuel Kant

    Crimes against children are the most heinous crime. That, for me, would be a reason for capital punishment because children are innocent and need the guidance of an adult society.
    -Clint Eastwood

    You just have to have the guidance to lead you in the direction until you can do it yourself.
    -Tina Yothers

  • Multimedia/Visual Strategies

    PowerPoint™:

    • School-Aged Children
    • Presentation Notes School Aged Children

    Technology:

  • Websites:

    Files for downloading:

  • Graphic Organizers/Handout

    Graphic Organizer:

    • KWHL Chart – School-Aged Children

    Handouts:

    • Google™ Sites Instructions
    • Note taking – School-Aged Children
    • Observations of the School-Aged Child
    • School-Aged Children Project

    Files for downloading:

  • Writing Strategies

    Journal entries:

    • Describe the physical development of children aged 6 – 10 years.
    • Describe the social development of children aged 6 – 10 years.
    • Describe the emotional development of children aged 6 – 10 years.
    • Describe the cognitive development of children aged 6 – 10 years.
    • What is the biggest difference between teaching preschool and elementary students?
    • As a future educator, it is important to know…..
    • It is important to know _________ about teaching school-aged children because……..

    Writing strategy:

    • RAFT (Role, Audience, Format and Topic) writing strategy:
      Role: Parent
      Audience: Family member
      Format: Letter
      Topic: Pretend you are the parent of a child who is aged 6 – 10 years. Describe his or her growth and development to a family member who has not seen him or her in a long time.
  • Communication 90 Second Speech Topics

    • How do you encourage healthful eating habits in school-aged children?
    • The transition from preschool to elementary school involves….
  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    Students can create flyers and other advertisements to promote the mini children’s health fair. See Service Learning.

  • Family/Community Connection

    Invite guest speakers to come to the class to discuss topics in growth and development. Possible ideas include: the school nurse; local nurses, doctors or dentists; and the county extension agent for family and consumer sciences.

  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)

    http://texasfccla.org

    STAR Events:

    • Early Childhood Education – An individual event that recognizes participants who demonstrate their ability to use knowledge and skills gained from their enrollment in an occupational early childhood program.
    • Focus on Children – An individual or team event – recognizes participants who use Family and Consumer Sciences skills to plan and conduct a child development project that has a positive impact on children and the community.

    Texas Association of Future Educators (TAFE)

    http://tafeonline.org

    TAFE Events:

    • Lesson Planning and Delivery – CTE – This competition is an individual event where future educators will plan, prepare and deliver a lesson of their choosing to an actual CTE classroom of students. Self-reflection following the lesson is an essential component of this competition as future educators begin the practice of honing their own teaching skills. Participants will prepare a lesson plan and a 10 minute video teaching the lesson to a class.
    • Children’s Literature Competition – The book may be written and illustrated by one individual (the author/illustrator) or two individuals (an author and an illustrator) Assistance with illustrations using graphic design, computer animation or other artist assistance is permissible for the artwork of the book. The participant will prepare the original short story book format designed for a specific age audience (ages 3-5; ages 6-8; ages 9-11).
  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to lesson. For additional information on service learning see http://www.servicelearning.org

    Possible idea: Host a mini children’s health fair. Include a variety of booths that cover specific topics in growth and development of school-aged children. Invite members of the community to take part in the fair such as a local family medical practice or family dentistry practice.