Recipe for Success: Breaking Down Standardized Recipes (revised)

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Hospitality and Tourism

    Course : Culinary Arts

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (1) The student applies advanced reading, writing, mathematics, and science skills for the food service industry. The student is expected to:
      • (A) compose industry appropriate documents
      • (C) calculate correctly using numerical concepts such as percentages and estimations in practical situations, including weight and measures
      • (D) understand scientific principles used in culinary arts
      • (E) read and comprehend standardized recipes
      • (F) write and convert standardized recipes
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • identify the components of a standardized recipe
    • compare and contrast the difference between a recipe and a standardized recipe
    • identify the benefits of using standardized recipes in the foodservice industry
    • distinguish between a formula for baking and a recipe
    • calculate the conversion factor for standardized recipes
    • identify mise en place
  • Rationale

    Script:

    (Revised 7/18/2015) Do you know the difference between a recipe and a standardized recipe? Standardized recipes are used in the foodservice industry to consistently prepare quality food, reduce costs and eliminate waste.
    In this lesson, we will learn how to adjust recipes and convert them to standardized recipes using the conversion factor. We will also learn the mise en place steps to prepare us for cooking in the industry.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Three 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Conversion factor: Increasing or decreasing recipe ingredients by dividing the new yield by the current yield

    Formula: A special type of recipe used in the bakeshop that includes the precise amount of each ingredient

    Mise en place: A French term that means “to put in place”

    Portion size: The amount or size of an individual serving

    Quality control: System that ensures that everything meets the foodservice establishment’s standards

    Recipe: A precise set of directions for using ingredients, procedures, and cooking instructions for a certain dish

    Standardized recipe: A set of written instructions used to consistently prepare a known quantity and quality of a certain food for a foodservice operation

    Work simplification: Performing a task in the most efficient way possible

    Yield: Number of servings the recipe makes

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for PowerPoint™ presentation
    • computers with Internet access (be sure to follow school district guidelines)
    • light projector (Elmo)

    Materials:

    • calculators
    • family recipes
    • foodservice cookbooks
    • standardized recipes

    Supplies:

    • measuring cups
    • measuring spoons
    • measuring scales

    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)

  • Anticipatory Set

    Before class begins:

    Distribute the handout Anticipatory Guide: Recipe for Success (see All Lesson Attachments tab) to the students and instruct them to place a check mark by the statements they THINK are true.

    After the lesson, this handout will be revisited in the Lesson Closure section to check for knowledge of the lesson.

    Ask students the following questions:

    • What is the difference between a recipe (from home) and a standardized recipe?
    • Who uses standardized recipes?
    • Do you know how to convert a small quantity recipe to a large quantity recipe?
    • What is mise en place?

    Discuss answers with students.

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce terms, definitions and objectives.

    Select and distribute a handout or graphic organizer from the Instructional Strategies drop down menu in Classroom Essentials or instruct students to take notes in their journal books or on their own paper.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/Note-Taking.pdf

    Distribute the handouts and graphic organizers Components of a Standardized Recipe, Mise en Place Steps, Recipe vs. Standardized Recipe and Science of Baking (see All Lesson Attachment tab). Students should complete the worksheets during the slide presentation.

    Introduce the PowerPoint™ Recipe for Success: Breaking Down Standardized Recipes (see All Lesson attachments tab). Students will be expected to take notes while viewing the slide presentation. Allow time for classroom discussion.

    View the YouTube™ video:

    • Mise En Place Trailer
      The title of the documentary comes from the French culinary term Mise En Place, the expression for everything in place the rigorous preparation of ingredients and equipment that leads to success in the kitchen. The documentary will follow Team Delhi as they learn that Mise En Place applies not only in the kitchen, but in life.
      https://youtu.be/k411BjqGKUU

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • peer tutor for handouts
    • printed copy of slide presentation

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Place the teacher resource Why Use Standardized Recipes (see All Lesson Attachments tab) on a light projector to emphasize the importance of standardized recipes.

    Distribute calculators and the handout Converting Standardized Recipes (see All Lesson Attachments tab).

    Distribute the handout Measuring Success with Standardized Recipes (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that students may use it as a reference.

    Explain the importance of being able to convert a simple recipe to a standardized recipe.

    Place copy of the handout on a light projector and guide students as they begin to work the first problem.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • peer tutor
    • shortened assignment

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Distribute the handout Adjusting Recipes (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and instruct the students to locate a recipe from a cookbook or the Internet to increase or decrease the yield.

    Recipes are also available at these websites:

    • Institute of Child Nutrition
      Part of the School of Applied Science at The University of Mississippi, is the only federally funded national center dedicated to applied research, education and training, and technical assistance for child nutrition programs. It is funded by a grant administered through the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Food and Nutrition Service (FNS).
      http://www.nfsmi.org/Templates/TemplateDefault.aspx?qs=cElEPTEwMg==

    • What’s Cooking: USDA Mixing Bowl
      Food, Nutrition and Consumer Services works to harness the Nation’s agricultural abundance to end hunger and improve health in the United States.
      http://www.whatscooking.fns.usda.gov/

    Students should follow the examples from the Guided Practice section.

    Distribute the handout USDA Standardized Recipe Template (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and instruct students to complete the template with their standardized recipe.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • shortened assignment
    • check for understanding

  • Lesson Closure

    Review terms, definitions and objectives.

    Re-distribute the handout Anticipation Guide: Recipe for Success from the Anticipatory Set.

    Allow students to re-read each statement and place a check mark by the statements they KNOW are true. They should also provide information that PROVES other statements are not true.

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Distribute the handout Recipe for Success Quiz (see All Lesson Attachment tab).

    Students will be assessed with a quiz grade.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • using notes for quiz
    • highlighted assessment

  • References/Resources

    Images:

    • Shutterstock™ images. Photos obtained with subscription.

    Textbooks:

    • Culinary essentials. (2010). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
    • Draz, J., & Koetke, C. (2014). The culinary professional. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.
    • Foundations of restaurant management & culinary arts._(2011). Boston, MA: Prentice Hall.

    Websites:

    • Institute of Child Nutrition
      Part of the School of Applied Science at The University of Mississippi, is the only federally funded national center dedicated to applied research, education and training, and technical assistance for child nutrition programs. It is funded by a grant administered through the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Food and Nutrition Service (FNS).
      http://www.nfsmi.org/
    • What’s Cooking: USDA Mixing Bowl
      Food, Nutrition and Consumer Services works to harness the Nation’s agricultural abundance to end hunger and improve health in the United States.
      http://www.whatscooking.fns.usda.gov/

    YouTube™:

    • Mise En Place Trailer
      The title of the documentary comes from the French culinary term Mise En Place, the expression for everything in place the rigorous preparation of ingredients and equipment that leads to success in the kitchen. The documentary will follow Team Delhi as they learn that Mise En Place applies not only in the kitchen, but in life.
      https://youtu.be/k411BjqGKUU
  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • word wall
    • draw visual representations of terms on word wall
    • add terms and definitions to personal dictionary
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    College and Career Readiness Connection
    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    Students may create a cookbook of standardized recipes to use in the culinary lab.

    Infographics:

    Infographics are graphic visual representations of information, data or knowledge intended to present complex information quickly and clearly.

    The infographic below is related to this lesson. Allow students to view the image on a projector and lead a discussion concerning the information provided.

    • Chocolate Chip Cookies
      Whatever you concoct in your kitchen, try it with a visual recipe next time, and see if it tastes as good as it looks.
      http://www.dsruption.com/visual.ly/a/5151b1fb4717cc0200000129

    TED Talks:

    TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event.

    The video below is related to this lesson. Allow students to view the video and lead a discussion concerning the TED Talk.

    • TEDxMidAtlantic 2011 – Jose Andres – Creativity in Cooking Can Solve Our Biggest Challenges
      A native of Spain, José Andrés is chef/owner of ThinkFoodGroup,
      and is responsible for Washington’s popular and award-winning dining concepts Jaleo, Zaytinya, Oyamel, America Eats Tavern and the critically-acclaimed minibar by josé andrés. José was named Outstanding Chef of the Year at the 2011 James Beard Foundation Awards.
      http://tedxtalks.ted.com/video/TEDxMidAtlantic-2011-Jose-Andre;Food


    Math Assessment Problem

    (1) The student applies advanced reading, writing, mathematics, and science skills for the food service industry. The student is expected to:

    • (C) calculate correctly using numerical concepts such as percentages and estimations in practical situations, including weight and measures.
    • (E) read and comprehend standardized recipes.

    Question 4. Mr. Chan is the head chef for a popular bakery. Three dozen of his world famous yeast rolls call for 4 ounces of yeast to be dissolved into 2 cups of warm water. If Mr. Chan has been commissioned to make 1,000 rolls for a Thanksgiving feast, approximately how many pounds of yeast is he going to need?
    a. 7 pounds
    b. 38 pounds
    c. 73 pounds
    d. 111 pounds

  • Family/Community Connection

    Rewrite family recipes to standardized recipes using the conversion factor. This will allow for quantity cooking for family reunions.

  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career, and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)

    http://www.fcclainc.org

    • Culinary Arts
      A team event: Recognizes participants enrolled in occupational culinary arts/food service training programs for their ability to work as members of a team to produce a quality meal using industrial culinary arts/food service techniques and equipment.
    • Food Innovations
      An individual or team event that recognizes participants who demonstrate knowledge of the basic concepts of food product development by creating an original prototype formula, testing the product through focus groups, and developing a marketing strategy.

    SkillsUSA

    http://skillsusa.org/

    • Culinary Arts
      The competition will encompass both hot and cold food preparation and presentation. Contestants will demonstrate their knowledge and skills through the production of a four-course menu in a full day competition. The contestants will be rated on their organization, knife skills, cooking techniques, creative presentation, sanitation food safety techniques, and above all, the quality and flavor of their prepared items. The high school competitors will work from one menu with standardized recipes. The college/postsecondary students will work from a market basket format and write their own menu and recipes the night before the competition.
  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to this lesson.
    www.ysa.org

    Possible ideas:
    Volunteer at the local homeless shelter to prepare meals, cater a luncheon or rewrite recipes.

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