Preventing Infections in the Salon Environment

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Human Services

    Course : Cosmetology I

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    Cosmetology I

    • (1) The student investigates the employability characteristics of a successful worker in the workplace. The student is expected to:
      • (A) integrate organizational policies, procedures, and regulations to establish personal care organization priorities; accomplish the mission

    • (2) The student combines academic skills with cosmetology requirements. The student is expected to:
      • (A) apply principles of biology, identifying living tissues, cells, and organisms to provide and select safe and effective personal care products and services
      • (B) classify and apply principles of chemistry and explain the composition, structure, and properties of substances and of chemical processes to provide a broad range of personal care services
    • (3) The student applies the rules and regulations established by the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation. The student is expected to:
      • (A) review and implement emergency policies and procedures regarding health and safety
      • (B) research risks and potentially hazardous situations to maintain a clean record of safety when providing personal care services
      • (C) perform at least one-third of practical applications as required by the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation or the governing body

    Cosmetology II

    • (1) The student consolidates the employability characteristics of a successful worker in the workplace. The student is expected to:
      • (C) review technical knowledge and skills required to be successful in careers in the human services area
      • (F) integrate logical reasoning in a variety of ethical workplace situations in order to make sound decisions

    • (2) The student consolidates academic skills to satisfy the requirements of cosmetology. The student is expected to:
      • (A) apply and defend principles of biology, identifying living tissues, cells and organisms to provide and select safe and effective personal care products and services
      • (B) merge principles of chemistry, explaining the composition, structure, and properties of substances and of chemical processes to provide a broad range of personal care services
    • (3) The student implements rules and regulations established by the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation. The student is expected to:
      • (A) apply and defend emergency policies and procedures regarding health and safety
      • (B) evaluate risks, including potentially hazardous situations, to maintain a clean record of safety when providing personal care services
      • (C) perform and complete all practical requirements as required by the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation or the governing body
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • review the Cosmetologists Health and Safety Rules for Texas
    • research diseases such as bacteria, viruses, bloodborne pathogens, fungi and parasites
    • analyze preventive procedures for infection control
    • practice correct handwashing procedures
    • practice disinfecting work surfaces, foot spas and manicure and pedicure tools
  • Rationale

    (Revision)
    Have you ever been in a salon that did not look clean? Did it make you feel as though you wanted to walk out and go somewhere else? Many public places are required to follow certain rules and regulations to meet public safety standards and prevent the spread of germs and diseases.

    As a cosmetologist, you will come into contact with many different people every day. In order to prevent the spread of diseases, you will need to know how to thoroughly clean and disinfect your implements, foot spas and work surfaces to protect yourself and your clients.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Five 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Bacilli: Short rod-shaped bacteria. The most common bacteria and produce diseases such as tetanus (lockjaw), typhoid fever, tuberculosis, and diphtheria

    Cocci: Round shaped bacteria that appear singly (alone) or in groups. The three types of cocci are staphylococci, streptococci, and diplococci

    Decontamination: The removal of blood or other potentially infectious materials on an item’s surface and the removal of visible debris or residue such as dust, hair, and skin

    Flagella: Slender, hair like extensions used by bacilli and spirilla for locomotion (moving about). May also be referred to as cilia

    Fungi (singular: fungus): Microscopic plant parasites, which include molds, mildews, and yeasts; can produce contagious diseases such as ringworm

    Hepatitis: A bloodborne virus that causes disease and can damage the liver

    Infection control: The methods used to eliminate or reduce the transmission of infectious organisms

    Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS): Information compiled by the manufacturer about product safety, including the names of hazardous ingredients, safe handling and use procedures, precautions to reduce the risk of accidental harm or overexposure, and flammability warnings

    Parasites: Organisms that grow, feed, and shelter on or in another organism (referred to as the host), while contributing nothing to the survival of that organism. Parasites must have a host to survive

    Scabies: A contagious skin disease that is caused by the itch mite, which burrows under the skin

    Spirilla: Spiral or corkscrew-shaped bacteria that cause disease such as syphilis and Lyme disease

    Tinea: The technical term for ringworm. Characterized by itching, scales, and sometimes, painful circular lesions. Caused by a fungal organism and not a parasite

    Note: Many other terms on the slide presentation can be identified. Encourage students to include the definition in the assignment.

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for multi-media presentation
    • computer with internet access (be sure to follow district guidelines for internet access)
    • presenter/remote

    Materials:

    • cardstock
    • colored pencils, crayons or markers
    • glue or hot glue guns
    • Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS ) from various products
    • paper, 12” x 18”

    Supplies:

    • autoclave unit (if you are unable to move the unit, have pictures or information available)
    • candies (optional)
      • Pez®, Skittles ®, Tic Tac’s®, Twizzlers®
    • combs (several)
    • Barbacide jar®/wet sanitizer
    • brushes
    • gloves
    • nail clippers
    • scissors
    • tongs
    • tweezers

    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)

  • Anticipatory Set

    Before class begins:

    At the front of the classroom, or a central location, gather, arrange and display items necessary for infection control in the salon setting (see Materials or Specialized Equipment Needed tab).

    Allow students to view the items and discuss the importance of cleaning, sanitizing and disinfecting cosmetology tools in a salon.

    Distribute the handout Danger at Your Local Salon (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and instruct the students to read the ten statements and check the statements they believe are true.

    Lead a discussion about the statements and whether the statements are true or not.

    Students will re-visit this document in the Lesson Closure tab.

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Distribute graphic organizer Note-Taking: Preventing Infections in a Salon Environment (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Students should take notes during the slide presentation.

    Introduce PowerPoint™ Preventing Infections in the Salon Environment (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Instruct students to take notes during the presentation. Make sure to focus on the contents of each slide. Encourage questions and discussion.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • check for understanding
    • provide assistance with note-taking

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Review handouts Cosmetology Sanitation Rules – Texas and A Guide for Nail Salon Workers (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Discuss the safety rules and how important they are to salon employees and customers.

    Distribute the handout The Science of Handwashing (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and log on to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website so that students may take notes:

    Guide the students through the steps.

    View the CDC video:

    • Put Your Hands Together
      Researchers in London estimate that if everyone routinely washed their hands, a million deaths a year could be prevented. From doorknobs to animals to food, harmful germs can live on almost everything. Handwashing may be your single most important act to help stop the spread of infection and stay healthy.
      http://www.cdc.gov/cdctv/handstogether/

    Demonstrate how to properly wash your hands and then have students practice this on their own. Encourage them to sing the Happy Birthday song twice or sing the ABC song as they wash their hands.


    Distribute the handouts Foot Spa and Foot Basin Sanitation Requirements, Guideline for Cleaning and Disinfecting Manicuring and Enhancement Equipment, Non-Whirlpool Foot Basin/Tub Cleaning and Disinfection Record and Whirlpool Foot Spa Instructions (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and review each handout.

    Review the handouts as these are industry recognized standards to prevent infections in the salon environment.

    Demonstrate the two decontamination methods of cleaning, disinfecting and sterilizing. Show how to use the autoclave correctly and how it works to sterilize tools. Allow the students an opportunity to practice.

    Demonstrate the proper use of disinfectants and the different types used. Be sure to discuss safety with the chemicals used. Show students how to disinfect work surfaces, foot spas and pedicure equipment according to code. Allow the students to practice.

    Optional:
    Gather supplies for the Bacteria Candy Activity (see All Lesson Attachments tab).

    Distribute 12 x 18 inch papers to students. Inform students that this is an individual project but they may assist each other in the process. Read the main instructions to the students. Students may write in the definitions on their own using their textbook or notes.

    If candy is not all used on the project, it can be eaten as a snack (follow school guidelines for food/candy consumption in the classroom). Allow 30 minutes for students to complete project and one day to fully dry before displaying.

    Assist students during the project process to ensure they understand the bacteria concept.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • providing peer tutoring
    • checking for understanding

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Before class begins, print the Infections Flashcards (see All Lesson Attachments tab) on cardstock and separate. Place the cards in a basket.

    Divide the class into subgroups of two. Allow one partner to pick an infection card to research. Partners must locate information for chosen topic from reliable sources and create a multi-media presentation.

    Multi-media presentation programs include emaze™, Glogster™ EDU, Prezi™, Snapguide™ or Microsoft® applications such as PowerPoint™, Publisher™ or Word™. See link below for media resources.

    Include the following in the research in this order:

    • description of infection
    • exposure to clients
    • preventative methods
    • decontamination method needed

    Distribute Rubric for Preventing Infections in a Salon Presentation (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and review so that students understand what is expected.

    Students should be prepared to present the information to the class.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • checking for understanding
    • assisting student in recalling information
    • providing praise and encouragement

  • Lesson Closure

    Review lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Assign students to read the article below:

    Re-distribute the handout Danger in Your Local Salon (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and instruct the students to re-read each statement and make any corrections.

    Students should use the space under each statement to note the page, column and paragraph(s) where they find information to support their thinking.

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Students will present their research information to the class and will be assessed with the appropriate rubric.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • grading according to work done
    • providing praise and encouragement

  • References/Resources

    Textbook:

    • Frangie, C. M. (2012). Milady standard cosmetology. Clifton Park, NY: Cengage Learning.
    • Backe, J. (2016). Milady standard cosmetology. Clifton Park, NY: Cengage Learning.
    • Salon fundamentals. (2012). Evanston, IL: Pivot Point International.

    Websites:

    Video:

    • Put Your Hands Together
      Handwashing may be your single most important act to help stop the spread of infection and stay healthy.
      www.cdc.gov/CDCTV/HandsTogether
  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • use “word wall” for vocabulary words
    • work with a peer tutor
    • peer to read materials
    • highlighted materials for emphasis
    • shortened simplified instructions
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    Have students produce large scale 3-D models of all the bacteria classifications discussed in this lesson including a summary of what diseases each of them cause.

    Students can compare and contrast various MSDS sheets from products used in the salon.

  • Family/Community Connection

    Have students examine their homes or the salon/lab setting. Have them list areas of potential sanitation hazards and what can be done to correct or prevent a contamination issue.

  • CTSO connection

    SkillsUSA

    http://skillsusa.org/

    Note: Students who compete in the Cosmetology competitions in SkillsUSA must have knowledge of how to safely handle a blood spill and maintain a clean and sanitary work environment. Points will be deducted from the overall score should students not follow safety and sanitary guidelines.

    • Nail Care
      The purpose of this contest is to evaluate each contestant’s preparation for employment and to recognize outstanding students’ excellence and professionalism in the field of nail technology. The contest consists of 6 separate segments; oral communication skills, acrylic application, tips applied and overlaid with a light-cured gel, nail polish application, nail art pedicuring and a written exam. The written exam tests basic knowledge of proper sanitation, chemical safety, salon procedures, etc. The practical applications evaluate the contestant’s ability to perform the most common nail services in the salon today.
  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to lesson.

    Possible idea:

    Students can meet with the student council or school administration about providing hand sanitizers in all restrooms and/or classrooms to prevent the spread of the common cold and/or flu.

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