Play with Me!

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Human Services

    Course : Child Guidance

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (4) The student analyzes the effect of play in the development of children. The student is expected to:
      • (A) create examples of play that promote the physical, intellectual, emotional and social development of children;
      • (B) describe characteristics and safety features of developmentally appropriate play activities, toys, and equipment for children
      • (C) describe strategies caregivers may use to encourage constructive play and creative play
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • develop a play center and include strategies that will promote constructive and creative play
    • analyze the characteristics and safety features of various toys, games and equipment that promote physical, intellectual, emotional and social development of children of different ages
  • Rationale

    Script:

    You will learn the importance of play in young children and how it encourages them to think creatively. The activities in this lesson will provide you a knowledge base for working with children.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Two 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Developmentally appropriate: Principles and guidelines for best practice in the care and education of young children, birth through age 8

    Emotional development: The process by which infants and children begin developing the capacity to experience, express, and interpret emotions

    Intellectual development: Refers to the growth of children in such a way that their brain becomes more and more capable of understanding and evaluating concepts to make sense out of the world around them

    Physical development: Physical development is the development of a child’s mobility, thought processes and sexual characteristics

    Social development: Learning the skills that enable a person to interact and communicate with others in a meaningful way

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for PowerPoint™ presentation

    Materials:

    • construction paper
    • glue
    • magazines
    • markers
    • scissors
    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Anticipatory Set

    Before class begins:

    Place different toys, games and equipment on a table in the center of the classroom.

    As class begins, allow students to play with items.

    Lead discussion, include questions such as:

    • What was your favorite toy as a child and why?
    • What was your favorite center to play in when you were in elementary school?
    • Do you have to spend a lot of money on a toy for it to promote creative or constructive play? Ask for examples.

    Distribute the KWL Chart and have students fill in the first two sections. (see All Lesson Attachments tab)

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce new terms and definitions. Refer to word wall. Give examples of each word. Allow students to draw an illustration that represents each term to assist them in remembering the definitions.

    Introduce Play with Me! PowerPoint™, see (All Lessons Attachments tab).
    Use actual toys as examples throughout the slide presentation. Allow for discussion and questions.

    Tell a story from your childhood and relate it to how it encouraged you to be creative and promote development.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • giving positive feedback
    • encouraging participation

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Have students create a chart on their own paper to collect information below.

    Show students several different types of toys. Discuss what age child each toy would be appropriate for, safety features, ways toy would promote physical, intellectual, emotional and/or social development of children.

    Have students describe strategies parents and caregivers can use to encourage constructive play and creative play.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • providing extra time for responses
    • encouraging participation

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce project and rubric. Students will be given the option of creating a play center or a toy for a child ages 3 to 5.

    • If students select to create a center, they may use computer animation software or create a three dimensional diorama. Students must research types of centers and include a written report on the type of center they created and how it will promote the physical, intellectual, emotional and/or social development of children.
    • If students choose to create a toy, they must research the process of developing a toy and create a prototype. Their final project will include a written report explaining the steps in developing the toy and how it will encourage constructive and/or creative play.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • allowing extended time for assignment
    • providing frequent student/teacher contact to help student start and remain on task

  • Lesson Closure

    Review lesson objectives.

    Select toys that were discussed earlier in the lesson. Have students volunteer to explain how each toy encourages creative play.
    • Have students give examples of play that promote the physical, intellectual, emotional and social development of children.
    • Have students write five sentences about their favorite childhood toy, describing what type of play it promoted.
    • Have the students complete the KWL chart. Discuss results.

    Check for understanding.

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Students will present Play projects. Projects will be assessed with a rubric (see All Lesson Attachments tab).

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • extending time
    • reducing length of written report

  • References/Resources

    Publications:

    • National Association for the Education of Young Children
      Articles and information on children
      http://www.naeyc.org
  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • Word wall
    • Provide visuals
    • Preteach vocabulary
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Recommended Strategies

    Reading Strategies

    Print and read publications listed in the references/resources tab. Summarize articles.

  • Quotes

    My childhood may be over, but that doesn’t mean playtime is.
    -Ron Olson

    Truly wonderful the mind of a child is.
    -YODA, Star Wars Episode II

  • Multimedia/Visual Strategies

    PowerPoint™:

    • Play With Me!

    Websites:

    • National Association for the Education of Young Children
      Articles and information on children
      http://www.naeyc.org

    Files for downloading:

  • Graphic Organizers/Handout

    Graphic Organizer:

    • KWL Chart

    Handouts:

    • Projects Rubric

    Files for downloading:

  • Writing Strategies

    Journal Entries:

    • As a parent, what safety features would be important to you in a toy?
    • Why is it important to play with your child and how does it help them develop?

    Writing Strategy:

    • RAFT
      • Role: Child Care Director
      • Audience: Parents
      • Format: Flyer
      • Topic: Importance of Play
  • Communication 90 Second Speech Topics

    • Play is important because ………..
    • My favorite toy as a child was………
  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    Have student babysit or play with a child for at least 30 minutes. Instruct students to write an observation report describing the toys, activities the child selected and what type of development was addressed.

  • Family/Community Connection

    Encourage students to volunteer at a local Boys and Girls Club, child care center, church, etc. Have students develop games and activities that promote learning and share with children.

  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)
    http://texasfccla.org

    • Service Learning Project
      Make or collect toys for the local children’s home, foster home or homeless shelters. Make sure toys are age appropriate.
  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to lesson. For additional information on service learning see
    http://www.servicelearningtexas.org

    • Team with elementary class or a local day care and have students observe and play with younger children for a class period.Document findings.
    • Students can organize a toy drive and donate the proceeds to a local charity for under privileged children.