Parenting Skills and Relationships

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Human Services

    Course : Child Development

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (1)The student analyzes roles and responsibilities of parenting. The student is expected to:
      • (B) analyze relationship skills, including money management, communication skills, and marriage preparation
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • create an individual spending plan
    • practice communication skills
    • model positive communication skills
  • Rationale

    As a professional in the field of Child Development you will be dealing with various parents, guardians and caregivers. It will be vital that you not only understand parenting skills, but also the dynamics of building healthy personal relationships. This lesson, Parenting Skills and Relationships, will focus on the roles and responsibilities of parenting as well as knowledge and skills in the areas of effective communication, appropriate marriage preparation and money management. All of these skills are important to the development and maintenance of a successful personal relationship.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Four 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Assets: Items of value that are owned by a business, institution, or individual

    Body Language: Includes facial expressions, eye behavior, gestures and posture

    Budget: A plan for managing income and expenses, also called a spending plan

    Communication: The imparting or interchange of thoughts, opinions, or information by speech, writing, or signs

    Disposable Income: Gross pay minus deductions for taxes

    Expense: The cost of goods and services, including those that are fixed (such as rent and auto loan payments) and those that are variable (such as food, clothing, and entertainment)

    Financial Plan: A plan of action that allows a person to meet not only immediate desires but also long-term goals

    Fixed Expenses: Costs that do not change from period to period or that change only very slightly. Fixed expenses are usually paid on a regular basis, such as week-to-week, month-to-month, quarter-to-quarter, or year-to-year. Typical household fixed expenses are mortgage or rent payments, car payments, real estate taxes, and insurance premiums

    Gross Income: Total personal income before taxes, exclusions, and deductions

    Gross Pay: Wages or salary before deductions for taxes and other purposes

    Long-Term Goal: A projected state of affairs which a person plans to achieve some time in the future (several years later), with the anticipated result having intrinsic value to the person

    Needs: Items that are essential to someone’s survival. In personal finance, needs are things like utility bills and debt payments

    Net Income: Total income after taxes, allowances, and deductions

    Non-Verbal Communication: Body language, eye contact, appearance, and facial expressions.

    Relationship: The relation connecting or binding participants in a relationship

    Spending Plan: Helps determine what changes to make to spending to reach financial goals and live within your means

    Verbal Communication: Voice and tone

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for PowerPoint™ presentation
    • computers with Internet access (be sure to follow district guidelines for Internet access)
    • presenter remote

    Materials:

    • bags, bowls or hats (for drawing of word cards)
    • checkbook
    • check register
    • copies of bill statements
    • pictures of homes or apartments
    • play food
    • play money (for Anticipatory Set activity, may be purchased at a dollar store)

    Supplies:

    • markers
    • sets of Activity Words – Oh, Puh-leeeeeeze! (see All Lesson Attachments tab) for Guided Practice activity. (One set of activity words per group of students).
    • sheets of blank paper

    • copies of all handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Anticipatory Set

    Before class begins:

    • Print one set per group and cut out words from Activity Words – Oh, Puh-leeeeeeze! (see All Lesson Attachments tab).

    Display as many items from the Materials or Specialized Equipment Needed section as you have available on a table in the front of the room.

    Lead a brief discussion on the importance of communication.

    Effective communication skills, both verbal and non-verbal are important life skills. These skills must be practiced daily.

    • How can effective communication benefit you as a child development professional?
    • How can effective communication assist you in securing employment?
    • What types of clients and individuals might you be dealing with?
    • What types of situations might you be dealing with?

    In this activity you will see the importance of being aware and monitoring your facial expressions.

    Place students in groups of four. Distribute Oh, Puh-leeeeeeze! (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout. The activity in this handout will offer opportunities for students to practice communicating skills. Cut out the activity words Activity Words – Oh, Puh-leeeeeeze! (see All Lesson Attachments tab), fold each and place in a hat, bowl, or bag. Ask each person in the group to take one piece of paper. Using body language and facial expressions only, ask each person to demonstrate this emotion, while others try to guess it.

    Questions to ask students after completing the activity may include:

    Read the following statement to the group: ACTIONS SPEAK LOUDER THAN WORDS.

    • How many have heard this expression? When/where?
    • What does it mean?
    • How is this possible when actions do not “speak”?
    • How would you apply what you learned about communication skills to having a successful relationship?

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce lesson objectives, terms, and definitions.

    Distribute handout Parenting Skills and Relationships Notes (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Students will be expected to take notes while viewing the slide presentation.

    Introduce PowerPoint™ Parenting Skills and Relationships (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and begin the discussion with students. Allow for questions and answers to check for understanding.

    Have students number their paper from 1 to 10. Students will develop a list of five adjectives or phrases to describe strong couple relationships. Examples might include:

    Committment – It holds the relationship together in good and bad times.

    Then list five ways to strengthen a relationship. For example:

    Take time to nourish and develop the relationship.

    YouTube™ videos included in the PowerPoint™:

    • S.M.A.R.T. Goals
      Ever had a goal you couldn’t complete? Chances are it wasn’t a SMART Goal! We’ll show you what a SMART Goal is, how you can use them to improve both yours and your staff’s productivity, and how to set them up.
      http://youtu.be/Uy6qGhki-K4
    • Take Charge America-Budget Doctor
      The TCA Budget Doctor discusses food budgeting and why it is important to monitor your spending.
      http://youtu.be/zN4I67BWnHk

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • checking for understanding
    • providing a copy of slide presentation

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    “Where’s My Dough Going?” Activity

    • Provide each student with a sheet of blank paper and a marker.
    • Ask students to create a list of their expenses on one side of the paper. If needed, remind students that expenses are usually divided into the following categories: taxes, savings and investing, insurance, housing, transportation, food, and other.
    • Instruct students to estimate how much they spend on each expense and write that down as well.
    • Distribute play money to each student. The amount distributed does not need to be identical for each person.
    • Tell the students that the play money represents income.
    • Suggest to students that this is similar to real life in that everyone has a limited amount of income. Discuss real life situations.
    • Why do some individuals earn more than others? (represented by the play money – different amounts given to each student).
    • What circumstances can provide a person with more “dough”?
    • What are ways to determine or increase one’s income?
    • Instruct students to divide their play money into sections to show how much income is spent on various expense. He or she may draw sections on the play money to represent how much he or she spends on expenses.
    • Depending upon the number of expenses a student has, he or she may need to divide their expenses into similar categories. For example, snacks and sports drinks can both fall under the category of “food.”
    • Have students write a personal financial goal on their sheet of paper.
    • After the goal has been written, ask students, “Based upon your current spending, is it realistic to achieve your goal?”
    • Explain to students that they may need to make some tradeoffs and change the way he or she spend their money to reach that goal. How would this goal change if you were married and had a family?
    • Instruct students to make any needed adjustments to their play money in order to reach their goal and indicate the change on their paper.
    • Inform students that they have started to develop a spending plan! A spending plan helps determine what changes to make to spending to reach financial goals and live within your means. This is important to understand if you decided to get married, have a long-term relationship, or live on your own.

    • What is one way a spending plan could help you with financial planning?
  • Optional: Locate and show a video clip of Everybody Loves Raymond episode titled “The Checkbook” in Season 2 Episode 16. In this episode, Raymond unsuccessfully manages the family budget and learns why it is important to have a spending plan.

    Students will practice setting up a household budget by playing the “Check It Out” game at:

    Scenario: You have recently married. You and your partner have decided to set up a household budget.

    Distribute Check It Out (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout. Students will understand the responsibility of having a full-time job and managing a household budget. Students will begin by each having one month’s worth of income and one month’s worth of bills. The student is in charge – he or she will decide which bills to pay and when to pay them. The main goal is to meet monthly financial obligations on time, without spending more than you have.

    Students need to ask themselves the following questions before making a purchase:

    • Do I really need this?
    • Will I be sorry later that I bought this?
    • Is it in my budget?
    • Can I afford it?

    Questions to ask students after completing the activity:

    How does this game relate to parenting and money management?
    Why are these skills important to have as a parent? As a marriage partner?
    Why is this an important component in the roles and responsibilities of parenting?

    Teacher Note: Refer to lesson: Personal Money Management for additional resources and activities on money management at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/personal-money-management/

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • pair up students who need extra support with students who are advanced or gifted and talented. Pairing them with responsible students helps them to learn from the model their peer is showing.
    • allow students to provide input in their own way. This includes written as well as verbal responses
    • ask students to write of draw their own input on the board, but allow those who are not comfortable with this to sit it out
    • pair up students who need extra support with students who are advanced or gifted and talented

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Separate Skit or Role Play Cards (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and place in a basket. There are 18 topics to select from. Blank cards have been provided for writing any other situations you may think of.

    Divide the students into subgroups of three or four and explain that they will choose a skit/role play and brainstorm solutions to the topic.

    Distribute Parenting Skills and Relationships Project Topics (see All Lesson Attachments tab).

    Distribute Rubric for Skit/Role Play (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that students understand what is expected. Students may make a video of their skit/role play and present it to the class.

    Allow time for discussion of the topic.

    Questions to ask students after completing the activity:

    How does this assignment analyze the roles and responsibilities of parenting?
    Are money management skills, communication skills, and marriage preparation important components of the over-all success of a family? How?

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • provide specific websites or articles from which students can obtain their research information
    • provide students with a checklist or rubric to help them organize and complete all steps of the process

  • Lesson Closure

    Review lesson objectives, terms, and definitions.

    Distribute handout What Did You Learn Today? (see All Lesson Attachments tab). The lesson closures activity is an instructional strategy which allows students to summarize main ideas, evaluate class processes, answer questions posed at the beginning of the lesson, and link to both the past and future. It also allows the teacher to evaluate the progress of the students and lesson.

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Students will present their skit/role plays.

    Students will be assessed with appropriate rubric.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • allow students to record their presentations in advance and present the recording (audio or visual) if they are frightened by presenting to a crowd
    • another method would be to allow them to present to you first, then present to the class after you have assured them that they have a good product to share.
      Allow non-verbal students to create a visual presentation with PowerPoint or other media devise and present their thoughts and research in this manner
    • provide students with visual or auditory impairments a copy of the notes or a fill in the blank note sheet to follow along with instruction

  • References/Resources

    • Microsoft Clip Art: Used with permission from Microsoft.

    Textbook:

    • Decker, C. (2011). Child development: Early stages through age 12. (5th ed.). Tinley Park: Goodheart-Willcox Company.

    Websites:

    YouTube™:

    • S.M.A.R.T. Goals
      Ever had a goal you couldn’t complete? Chances are it wasn’t a SMART Goal! We’ll show you what a SMART Goal is, how you can use them to improve both yours and your staff’s productivity, and how to set them up.
      http://youtu.be/Uy6qGhki-K4
    • Take Charge America-Budget Doctor
      The TCA Budget Doctor discusses food budgeting and why it is important to monitor your spending.
      http://youtu.be/zN4I67BWnHk
  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • draw connections between content and real life
    • speak slowly and clearly in a normal tone of voice
    • repeat key phrases
    • stress the main words in a sentence
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Recommended Strategies

    Reading Strategies

    Current Events:
    Assign student to read about relationship skills, including money management, communication skills, and marriage preparation.
    Information can be found in newspaper articles, magazines, journals, and online print.
    Suggestions:

    • Saving Fitness: A Guide to Your Money and Your Financial Future (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Quotes

    Parents can only give good advice or put them on the right paths, but the final forming of a person’s character lies in their own hands.
    -Anne Frank

    Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.
    -Benjamin Franklin

    What it’s like to be a parent: It’s one of the hardest things you’ll ever do but in exchange it teaches you the meaning of unconditional love.
    -Nicholas Sparks, The Wedding

    Children are made readers on the laps of their parents.
    -Emilie Buchwald

  • Multimedia/Visual Strategies

    PowerPoint™:

    • Parenting Skills and Relationships
    • Presentation Notes for Parenting Skills and Relationships

    Technology:

    YouTube™:

    • S.M.A.R.T. Goals
      Ever had a goal you couldn’t complete? Chances are it wasn’t a SMART Goal! We’ll show you what a SMART Goal is, how you can use them to improve both yours and your staff’s productivity, and how to set them up.
      http://youtu.be/Uy6qGhki-K4
    • Take Charge America-Budget Doctor
      The TCA Budget Doctor discusses food budgeting and why it is important to monitor your spending.
      http://youtu.be/zN4I67BWnHk

    Files for downloading:

  • Graphic Organizers/Handout

    Graphic Organizer:

    • Parenting Skills and Relationships Notes

    Handouts:

    • Activity Words – Oh, Puh-leeeeeeze! (Teacher Instructions)
    • Check It Out
    • Check It Out (Key)
    • Parenting Skills and Relationships Project Topics
    • Oh, Puh-leeeeeeze!
    • Rubric for Skit/Role Play
    • Saving Fitness: A Guide to Your Money and Your Financial Future
    • Skit or Role Play Cards
    • What Did You Learn Today?

    Files for downloading:

  • Writing Strategies

    Journal Entries:

    • Some reasons couples might give for having or not having a financial plan are___________.
    • What a spending plan means to me______________.
    • Good communication skills are vital to a relationship because___________.
    • My favorite way to communicate is ___________________.

    Writing Strategy:

    RAFT is a post-reading strategy outlined to determine student understanding of the material in a creative and relevant way. Students can be very creative in placing themselves in the role of the writer.

    Role: High school counselor
    Audience: High school students
    Format: Newsletter
    Topic: How to improve your relationships and communication skills

  • Communication 90 Second Speech Topics

    • When creating your own personal spending plan, you must…
    • The importance of communication when developing a spending plan for a family is …
  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    • Have students work in groups of 3-4 to prepare a presentation on one of the following:
      • Financial responsibilities of parenthood
      • Challenges of Single Parenting
      • Challenges of Parenting a Special Needs Child
      • Finding Adequate Quality Child Care
    • Why are spending plans an important of financial planning? Support your answer with two reasons.

    TED Talks:

    TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks videos and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event.

    The video below is related to this lesson. Allow students to view the video, and lead a discussion concerning the TED Talk.

    Laura Trice: Remember to say thank you
    In this deceptively simple 3-minute talk, Dr. Laura Trice muses on the power of the magic words “thank you” — to deepen a friendship, to repair a bond, to make sure another person knows what they mean to you. Try it.
    https://www.ted.com/talks/laura_trice_suggests_we_all_say_thank_you#t-50441

  • Family/Community Connection

    • Interview a parent to see how parenthood affected their life. After the interview, students will each write a one page personal reflection on what they learned from this interview and how they plan to use the information now and in the future.
    • Invite a local couple to speak about becoming a first time parent. Teens can gain a perspective on the benefits of good prenatal care and the responsibilities of parenthood.
    • Interview a family member or adult about spending plans and how they use them.
  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career and Community Leaders of America

    (FCCLA)
    http://www.fcclainc.org

    Career Connection Units:

    Career Connection guides students to develop, plan, carry out, and evaluate projects. The projects improve the quality of life in six (6) units. Students focus activities on different aspects of career development. Students can choose a unit, then plan and carry out related projects that strengthen their awareness of skills needed for careers.
    PLUG IN to Careers — Understand work and the Career Connection Program
    SIGN ON to the Career Connection — Link personal interests, skills, and goals to career clusters
    PROGRAM Career Steps — Prepare with education, leadership, and work experience
    LINK UP to Jobs — Learn to find and land a job
    ACCESS SKILLS for Career Success— Practice being productive on the job and promotable
    INTEGRATE Work and Life — Manage interconnected roles in families, careers, and communities.

  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to lesson.
    http://www.nylc.org/

    Possible ideas:

    • Develop a directory of government and private agencies that provide consumer protection and assistance to consumers.
    • Distribute the directory at a local community event.