No Longer a Teen: Development in Early Adulthood

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Education and Training

    Course : Human Growth and Development

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (8) The student understands the development of adults ages 20 through 39 years. The student is expected to:
      • (A) analyze various development theories relating to early adults, including biological and cognitive development
      • (B) analyze various development theories relating to early adults, including emotional, moral, and psychosocial development
      • (C) discuss the influences of society and culture on early adults
      • (D) discuss the importance of family, human relationships, and social interaction for early adults
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • compare and contrast two of the developmental theories presented in this unit related to early
      adulthood
    • describe the impact of at least two elements of the society or culture around them that could influence their development in early adulthood
    • analyze the influence and importance of social interactions as teenagers move into early adulthood
    • estimate how much it will cost annually to raise a child
  • Rationale

    Script:

    Adulthood! The long-awaited goal of most adolescents has been reached! Most young adults are entering this stage with enthusiasm for their future. Much time is devoted to establishing their independent lives: careers, starting their own families, and expanding social circles. As you enter adulthood, things will change, and you will be living on your own. Do you have the money to pay for “essentials” such as a cell phone, Internet, and car payments with gas and insurance? Are you ready for a long-term relationship? Will your friendships change? What careers are you interested in? Let’s talk about some of these issues as we discuss moving into adulthood.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Four 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Autonomous: Existing or acting separately from other things or people

    Commitment: The state or an instance of being obligated or emotionally impelled

    Development: Systematic changes that occur between the moment of conception and the moment the individual dies; systematic implies that developmental changes are orderly or patterned; temporary changes are excluded

    Dualism: The belief that things are either right or wrong

    Egalitarian: Being on an equal basis

    Formal Operations: Involves the ability to think abstractly

    Independent: Having enough money to support oneself; not relying on, or affected by, something or someone else

    Intimacy: Close, connected, and bonded feelings in a loving relationship; sharing one’s self and possessions; receiving and giving emotional support

    Relativism: Recognizing the ambiguities of life; problems may have more than one solution

    Theory: A public pronouncement that indicates what a scientist believes to be true about his/her specific area of investigation; a way of organizing thinking about a broad range of observations and events

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for PowerPoint™ presentation
    • computers with Internet access (be sure to follow district guidelines for Internet access)
    • presenter remote

    Materials:

    • calculators
    • checkbook
    • clipped coupons
    • clothing
    • college materials such as catalogs, pennants and shirts
    • entertainment items such as movie stubs, CDs and movie cases
    • food advertisements
    • food items
    • grocery store advertisements
    • health care items
    • play money (can be purchased at a store for minimal cost)
    • real estate information
    • transportation items such as ads for tires, tune-ups and/or vehicles for sale

    Supplies:

    • paper and pens
    • photos of students, brought from home

    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Anticipatory Set

    Prior to class:

    Note to Teacher: More information on finances and relationships can be found in these courses:

    Dollars and Sense
    Personal Money Management
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/personal-money-management/

    Interpersonal Studies
    Building Healthy Family Relationships
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/building-healthy-family-relationships/

    Building Healthy Lifelong Relationships
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/building-healthy-lifelong-relationships/

    Becoming Independent
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/becoming-independent/

    Display as many of the lesson-related supplies (see Materials or Specialized Equipment Needed) that you have available on a table in front of the room.

    Become familiar with PowerPoints™, handouts and activities.

    This lesson is divided into three mini-lessons to make it easier to present the information on multiple days. By distributing the information into mini-lessons, it will be easier for students to understand it.

    Part I: Theories of Biological and Cognitive Development
    Part II: Developmental Tasks of Young Adulthood (Havighurst)
    Part III: Societal and Cultural Influences

    Students will be asked at least two days in advance to bring a photo of themselves when they were at least five years younger.

    Before class begins:

    Allow students to observe the supplies and ask them the following questions:

    • Who do you think will be your friends when you are 25 years old? As a young adult, your social group will change.
    • What will you look for in a new social group as an adult and how will you find it?
    • List several ways you could become a member of a new group.
    • What does it mean to be an adult?
    • What are some responsibilities of an adult?
    • What resources would you need to carry out those responsibilities?
    • What do you look forward to doing as an adult? Why?
    • Are you ready to become a parent?
    • Does having a child make you an adult?
    • List at least five things you don’t do now that you will have to do if you have a child.

    In groups of two, students will discuss the physical changes that can be seen in the student from the older photo to current day. Each person will also share with their partner one change that is internal and cannot be seen.

    Allow for questions and discussion.

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Note to teacher: Prior to beginning this lesson, please review, preview and select the appropriate multimedia for your classes.

    Introduce lesson objective, terms and definitions.

    Distribute handout Double-Entry Journal Notes (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Students will be expected to take notes while viewing the slide presentation. Teacher will determine the notes to be recorded by students.

    Introduce PowerPoint™ No Longer a Teen: Development in Early Adulthood Part I: Theories of Biological and Cognitive Development, slides 3-14 (see All Lesson Attachments tab).

    Use appropriate notes from Presentation Notes for No Longer a Teen: Development in Early Adulthood (see All Lesson Attachments tab) for discussion.

    See Guided Practice Activity One

    Continue with the slide presentation No Longer a Teen: Development in Early Adulthood Part II: Developmental Tasks of Young Adulthood (Havighurst), slides 15-25 (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Have students continue using Double-Entry Journal Notes for note-taking.

    Use appropriate notes from Presentation Notes for No Longer a Teen: Development in Early Adulthood (see All Lesson Attachments tab) for discussion.

    Think about the young adults in your life. How has your childhood been different from theirs? What cultural and societal norms or expectations are different?

    See Guided Practice Activity Two

    Continue with the slide presentation No Longer a Teen: Development in Early Adulthood Part III: Societal and Cultural Influences, slides 26-32 (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Have students continue using Double-Entry Journal Notes for note-taking.

    Use appropriate notes from Presentation Notes for No Longer a Teen: Development in Early Adulthood (see All Lesson Attachments tab) for discussion.

    See Guided Practice Activity Three

    Video included in the slide presentation:

    • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
      Cancer in the Family. A news segment about individuals with a family member whose cigarette smoking led to a cancer diagnosis. (2013).
      http://youtu.be/9g-uhoCsZVc

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • additional time to complete in-class work or homework assignments
    • extra time for oral response
    • frequent feedback

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Guided Practice Activity One

    Distribute Major Theorists of Biological Development (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout. Allow students time to complete the handout. Check for understanding.

    Guided Practice Activity Two

    Distribute My Lifestyle and Dream Job (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout. Students will describe their ideal lifestyles and dream jobs as young adults and the necessary steps to get there. Students will work independently for ten minutes and then share and compare their selections with the teacher serving as facilitator.

    Guided Practice Activity Three

    Every community has civic and social groups that allow people to become involved as members or volunteers. Distribute Civic and Social Groups (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout. Students will create an annotated list of at least ten groups in their community. Each entry should give the name, address and contact information for the group, as well as any requirements to become a part of the group. Instruct students not to use more than two of any one type. In other words, list no more than two churches or two civic clubs and so forth.

    Distribute Social Media (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout. Ask students to list the “pros” of being a part of the various social media outlets. If they are not a part of a specific one, it can be left blank. Have students share their ideas with the group.

    Allow for questions and discussion.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • providing extra time for oral response
    • frequent feedback

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    With USDA’s Cost of Raising a Child Calculator, students will estimate how much it will cost annually to raise a child. This will help them understand the overall expenses including housing, food, transportation, clothes, health care, education and child care expenses. Direct students to the website:
    http://www.cnpp.usda.gov/calculatorintro.htm

    Students will complete Cost of Raising a Child (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout. Allow for questions and discussion. Use Cost of Raising a Child (Key) (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout as a guide to check their answers.

    Check for understanding.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • additional time to complete in-class handouts
    • additional time to complete homework assignments

  • Lesson Closure

    We’ve learned many things about the transition to adulthood. What bits of information were the most interesting to you? What did you learn that will help you as you become a young adult? What would you like to study further one day?

    Have the students sit in a circle. Each student will cite at least one thing they learned in this three-lesson unit. He/she must not repeat one already noted. Go around the circle twice.

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Assessments during lesson:

    • Major Theorists of Biological Development
    • My Lifestyle and Dream Job
    • Civic and Social Groups
    • Social Media
    • Cost of Raising a Child

    The students will write a one-page summary analyzing the importance of family, relationships, career, education, community service and good health during the young adult years. Students will reflect on how the lesson, activities and information will assist them in the future. The reflection and various handouts will be submitted for assessment.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • extra time for responses
    • prompting, if necessary

  • References/Resources

    Images:

    • Microsoft Clip Art: Used with permission from Microsoft.

    Journals:

    • Goodwin, P., Mosher, W., Chandra, A. (2010) Marriage and cohabitation in the United States: A statistical portrait based on Cycle 6 (2002) of the National Survey of Family Growth. Center for Disease Control. National Center for Health Statistics. Vital Health Stat 23(28). 2010.

    Textbooks:

    • Dacey, J., Travers, J., and Fiore, J. (2009). Human development across the lifespan. (7th ed.). Columbus, Ohio: McGraw-Hill Publishing Company.
    • Gallahue, D., Ozmun, J., and Goodway, J. (2012). Understanding motor development: infants, children, adolescents and adults. Columbus, Ohio: McGraw-Hill Publishing Company.
    • Lamanna, M. and Riedmann, A. (1994). Marriages and families: making choices and facing change. (5th ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing Company.
    • Papilla, D., Olds, S., and Feldman, R. (2006). Human development. (10th ed.) Columbus, OH: McGraw-Hill Publishing.
    • Perry, W. (1968). Forms of intellectual and ethical development in the college years. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston.
    • Santrock, J. (1997). 6th ed. Life-span development. Boston, MA: McGraw-Hill Publishing.
    • Steinberg, L. (2004). The ten basic principles of good parenting. New York: NY. Simon & Shuster Publishers.

    Websites:

    • United States Department of Agriculture
      With USDA’s Cost of Raising a Child Calculator, you can estimate how much it will cost annually to raise a child. This may help you plan better for overall expenses including food, or to purchase adequate life insurance.
      http://www.cnpp.usda.gov/calculatorintro.htm

    YouTube™:

    • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
      Cancer in the Family. A news segment about individuals with a family member whose cigarette smoking led to a cancer diagnosis. (2013).
      http://youtu.be/9g-uhoCsZVc
  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Recommended Strategies

    Reading Strategies

    Current Events:
    Assign students to read about early adulthood. Information can be found in newspaper articles, magazines, journals and online print.
    Suggestions:

    • Locate job applications, either in the newspaper or online.

    Encourage students to “make predictions” about the text content prior to reading. “I think it’s going to be about… because I know (I heard)…” This encourages active reading and keeps the student interested. While reading, the students may revise their original predictions and/or make new ones.

  • Quotes

    Whatever you can do, or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it.
    -Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

    The reward of a thing well done is to have done it.
    -Ralph Waldo Emerson

    Alcohol is a good preservative for everything but brains.
    -Mary Pettibone Poole

    We never know the love of our parents until we have become parents.
    -Henry Ward Beecher

    He who would learn to fly one day must learn to stand and walk and climb and dance; one cannot fly into flying.
    -Friedrich Nietzsche

    “Who are you?” said the Catepillar. Alice replied, rather shyly, “I—I hardly know , Sir, just at present—at least I know who I was when I got up this morning, but I must have changed several times since then.”
    -Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland, 1865

  • Multimedia/Visual Strategies

    PowerPoint™:

    • No Longer a Teen: Development in Early Adulthood
    • Presentation Notes for No Longer a Teen: Development in Early Adulthood

    Technology:

    YouTube™:

    • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
      Cancer in the Family. A news segment about individuals with a family member whose cigarette smoking led to a cancer diagnosis. (2013).
      http://youtu.be/9g-uhoCsZVc

    Files for downloading:

  • Graphic Organizers/Handout

    Graphic Organizers:

    • Major Theorists of Biological Development
    • Social Media

    Handouts:

    • Civic and Social Groups
    • Cost of Raising a Child
    • Cost of Raising a Child (Key)
    • My Lifestyle and Dream Job

    Files for downloading:

  • Writing Strategies

    Journal Entries:

    • Write some of the ways you think you will be different in five years.
    • Describe what you would like your family to be like when you find your mate and start a family.
    • List the types of jobs available that require only a high school education.
    • List the jobs you would like to have and the minimum requirements of the position.

    Writing Strategy:

    RAFT Writing Strategy

    Role – Young Adult
    Audience – Teenagers
    Format – Letter
    Topic – The benefits of a good education to help you achieve your goals in life

  • Communication 90 Second Speech Topics

    When I’m 25, I will be _____________.

    I want to be a parent because____________________.

    As an adult, I will support my community by ____________________.

  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    • Interview two of the adults responsible for providing your home. Ask them to list the tasks that are required to maintain the household, such as laundry, shopping and so forth and about how much time each one takes per week.
    • Extra credit: Obtain samples of job applications / either on-site or online. Note what is ordinarily asked and how you would answer those questions.
    • Prepare a basic résumé that includes your education and any awards or achievements. Add your work experience, with all the necessary contact information for those employers. You can find some examples here: http://www.dol.state.ga.us/js/resume_writing.htm
    • Divide students into groups of five. Distribute magazines and large sheets of poster paper. Assign one level of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs to each group, who will then create a collage with pictures of people showing the needs of that level. Have students use markers to title and subtitle the pictures. Each group will have a shout-out person, responsible for reporting back to the class about the poster collage.
    • Students will research various websites and read about smoking, alcohol, drug use and eating disorders. Students will bring back ten facts to share with the class.
  • Family/Community Connection

    • Invite a representative from the local workforce office or the Human Resource Director for one of the larger local employers to speak to the class. Ask them to describe or focus on what skills are in high demand, what employers look for on an application or in an interview and so forth.
  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)

    http://texasfccla.org

    • Illustrated Talk – An individual or team event – recognizes participants who make an oral presentation about issues concerning Family and Consumer Sciences and/or related occupations. Participants use visuals to illustrate content of the presentation.

    Texas Association of Future Educators (TAFE)

    http://www.tafeonline.org/

    • Educational Leadership Fundamentals – This competition is an individual event that recognizes participates who take a 30-minute timed exam about knowledge of the teaching profession.
  • Service Learning Projects

    True service learning is developed with student voice about concerns and needs. As the students are learning and researching this topic, ask them to think about ways they can maximize their learning to benefit others.
    http://gsn.nylc.org/

    Allow students to brainstorm ways the lesson relates to service projects.
    Example: Volunteer in a community setting.

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