My Personal Lifestyle, My Career Choice

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Education and Training

    Course : Principles of Education and Training

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    (1) The student completes career investigations within the education and training career cluster. The student is expected to:
    (C) recognize the impact of career choice on personal lifestyle

  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • explore possible personal lifestyle choices
    • understand the impact of career choices on one’s personal lifestyle
  • Rationale

    Planning for our future is much easier when we focus on the type of lifestyle we want to live. The key to living the type of lifestyle we select is understanding the the role of our career choice. We must also be aware of the fact that over time our wants and needs change.

    The purpose of this lesson is to explore various lifestyles and how they can be affected by our career choices.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Four 45 minute class periods.

  • Word Wall

    Career: An occupation undertaken for a significant period of a person’s life and with opportunities for progress

    Choice: An act of selecting or making a decision when faced with two or more possibilities

    Decision: The act or process of deciding. the act of or need for making up one’s mind

    Education: The act or process of acquiring knowledge. A particular kind of instruction or training

    Housing: Any shelter, lodging, or dwelling place

    Lifestyle: A set of attitudes, habits, or possessions associated with the way a particular person or group lives

    Need: A strong feeling that you must have or do something

    Physical Health: Combination of good nutrition,exercise and rest

    Recreation: A favorite pastime or activity that promotes refreshment of health, relaxation, and enjoyment

    Relationships: An emotional or other connection between people or things

    Transportation: Means of carrying or moving from one place to another

    Want: Have a desire to possess or do (something)

    Work: An effort directed to produce or accomplish something. Employment for pay

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer lab with Internet access (be sure to follow district guidelines for Internet access)
    • computer with projector for multimedia presentation
    • presenter/remote

    Materials:

    • colored paper
    • markers

    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Anticipatory Set

    Prior to the lesson:

    Play an inspirational song as students enter the classroom. Examples of inspirational songs may include:

    __

    As students enter the classroom, distribute one sheet of colored paper and a marker to each student. Ask them to imagine their life in their twenties. Then, ask students to write down words that describe their future life with a career in education and training. Allow students to complete the task while listening to the inspirational song.

    When the song concludes, facilitate a discussion with students about their future. Ask the following:

    • What words did you choose to describe your future? Why?
    • How does the song that was played relate to the choices you will make about your future lifestyle?
    • What is a lifestyle?
    • What are some lifestyle choices?
    • How are lifestyle choices determined?
  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Distribute graphic organizer, My Personal Lifestyle, My Career Choice in Education and Training Note-Taking (see All Lesson Attachments tab).

    IMPORTANT – slide presentation and presentation notes are TOO large to upload to this lesson. Please send request for dropbox invitation.

    Introduce slide presentation My Personal Lifestyle, My Career Choice in Education and Training Part I PowerPoint™ (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and My Personal Lifestyle, My Career Choice in Education and Training Part II PowerPoint™ (see All Lesson Attachments tab). The PowerPoint™ was too large to upload, so it was divided into two presentations. Allow student questions and discussions. The purpose of this presentation is to have students begin thinking about their future and their expectations.

    Teacher note: Allow the needs of your students to dictate which slides you spend the most time on. This activity can span several days. The choice is yours!

    Use appropriate notes from Presentation Notes for My Personal Lifestyle, My Career Choice in Education and Training (see All Lesson Attachments tab) discussion.

    Begin a discussion on the future and what the students envision their lives to be like while viewing slide presentation My Personal Lifestyle, My Career Choice in Education and Training Part I (see All Lesson Attachments tab), slides 3 – 33. Allow time for questions and class discussion.

    See Guided Practice Activity One

    Continue with the slide presentation My Personal Lifestyle, My Career Choice in Education and Training Part II (see All Lesson Attachments tab), and discuss slides 3-10 on lifestyle choices. Continue to use the appropriate notes from Presentation Notes forMy Personal Lifestyle, My Career Choice in Education and Training (see All Lesson Attachments tab) for discussion.

    See Guided Practice Activity Two

    Continue with the slide presentation My Personal Lifestyle, My Career Choice in Education and Training Part II (see All Lesson Attachments tab), and discuss slides 11-32 on lifestyle choices. Continue to use the appropriate notes from Presentation Notes for My Personal Lifestyle, My Career Choice in Education and Training (see All Lesson Attachments tab) for discussion.

    See Guided Practice Activity Three

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • checking for understanding
    • providing assistance with note-taking
    • providing extra time for oral response
    • frequent feedback
  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Guided Practice Activity One
    Distribute handout, Texas Reality Check (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Inform students they will be creating their personal future lifestyle based on the choices they envision for their future such as living arrangements, transportation, food, clothing and more.

    Guided Practice Activity Two
    Distribute handout, Cost of Living Calculator (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Inform students they will research the cost of living based on two cities of their choice using the website http://money.cnn.com/calculator/pf/cost-of-living/. The calculator determines how far a salary will go in one city versus another city. The calculator gives students an idea about how much it will cost for utilities, housing, transportation, groceries and health care.

    Guided Practice Activity Three
    Distribute handout, My Future Lifestyle (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Inform students they will choose their future lifestyle choices: Physical health, family/relationships, education, housing, transportation and a career/job in the education and training field.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • check for understanding
    • providing extra time for oral response
    • frequent feedback
    • providing peer tutoring
    • reducing length of assignment
    • assisting student in gathering information
    • providing praise and encouragement

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Option 1
    Distribute handout, Lifestyle Storyboard (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Inform students they will create a storyboard with their lifestyle choices utilizing the website Storyboard That located at http://www.storyboardthat.com/. The storyboard should be based on choices made on the My Future Lifestyle (see All Lesson Attachments tab) during Guided Practice Activity Three. Inform students that the storyboard should be made with a career in the education and training field.

    Option 2 – To be used if internet access is unavailable for each student to use.
    Distribute handout, Lifestyle Storyboard Template (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Inform students they will create a storyboard with their lifestyle choices utilizing the template provided. The storyboard should be based on choices made on the My Future Lifestyle (see All Lesson Attachments tab) during Guided Practice Activity Three.

    Distribute the handout, Rubric for Lifestyle Storyboard (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that the students understand what is expected.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • checking for understanding
    • providing extra time for oral response
    • frequent feedback
    • providing peer tutoring
    • reducing length of assignment

  • Lesson Closure

    Review lesson plan objectives, terms and definitions.

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Assess storyboard with appropriate rubric.

    Write a one page reflection on the components of the lifestyle that currently appeal the most to you.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • checking for understanding
    • grading according to work done
    • providing praise and encouragement

  • References/Resources

    Images:

    • Photos obtained through a license with Shutterstock.com™.

    Textbooks:

    • Bostick, A. (2009). I rock living my dreams: A success system. St. Louis, Missouri: United States.
    • Bingham, M. and Stryker, S. (2003). Career choices: A guide for teens and young adults. Third Edition. United States.
    • Flippen, M.B. (2001). Teen leadership developing leaders for the future. College Station, Texas.

    Websites:

    YouTube™:

  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • word wall
    • draw visual representations of terms on word wall
    • visual representations of 16 Career Clusters
    • http://www.learnerdictioary.com for pronunciation and meaning of terms
    • ask students to repeat your instructions back to you to be sure they know what is expected of them before each new phase of the lesson
    • discuss vocabulary in detail and make sure everyone has a firm grasp on it before moving forward with the lesson
    • use graphic organizers and visuals to explain the lesson in detail
    • print fill-in-the-blank handouts of the PowerPoint notes for students to follow along with the lesson
    • provide note-taking assistance using Article Stop and Jot
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    • Write a one-page paper about the following: How do your lifestyle choices relate to your career choice?
    • Allow students to do research on their dream car. How much will it cost? How much of a down payment will it require? What will auto insurance cost for it? How much will gasoline cost for the car?
    • Allow students to research housing options for the future. Will you rent or buy? How much will you pay for it? How much will renters/home owners insurance cost?
    • Allow students to research the cost of childcare. How many children do you plan to have? Who will care for them during the day? How much will this cost?
    • Allow students to research utility options. Will you have a cell phone and a land line? How much will this cost? How much will gas and electric cost? Will you have cable and internet? How much will that cost?
  • Family/Community Connection

    • Have students interview friends, family or teachers about their lifestyle choices. How did they reach the goals they set for themselves? Did they have to re-evaluate their lifestyle choices to match their salary?
  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)
    http://texasfccla.org

    STAR Events:

    • Career Investigation – An individual event that recognizes participants for their ability to perform self-assessments, research and explore a career, set career goals, create a plan for achieving goals, and describe the relationship of Family and Consumer Sciences coursework to the selected career.
    • Chapter Service Project (Display and Manual) – A team event – recognizes chapters that develop and implement an in-depth service project that makes a worthwhile contribution to families, schools and communities. Students must use Family and Consumer Sciences content and skills to address and take action on a community need.
    • Job Interview – An individual event – recognizes participants who use Family and Consumer Sciences and/or related occupations skills to develop a portfolio, participate in an interview and communicate a personal understanding of job requirements.
      Leadership – An individual event, recognizes participants who actively evaluate and grow in their leadership potential. Participants use the Student Leadership Challenge and supporting materials, to investigate their leadership ability and develop a mentorship relationship to further their leadership development.

    SkillsUSA
    http://skillsusa.org

    SkillsUSA Contests:

    • Community Action Project (Demonstration) – A team event – recognizes members who develop, execute, document and present a project that was completed in their community or school, which provides a benefit to the community or the school.
    • Community Service – A team event – recognizes chapters who chapter activities that benefit the community.
    • Employment Application Process – A individual event – recognizes members who complete an application, resume, portfolio and take part in an interview process.
    • Job Interview – A individual event – recognizes members who take part in a three-part contest: completion of employment applications, preliminary interviews with receptionist, and in-depth interviews.

    Texas Association of Future Educators
    http://tafeonline.org

    TAFE Competition:

    • Chapter Yearbook – A team event – recognizes chapters whose members work together to create a historical record of their chapter’s projects and activities throughout the year.
    • Job Interview – An individual event – recognizes participants who apply for a position as a paraprofessional. This competition includes submitting a cover letter explaining why the entrant is a good candidate for the position as well as a resume that details relevant work, volunteer, and educational experience. Then the competitor will be
      interviewed for the position.
    • Leadership Award – An individual event – recognizes participants who have made notable, voluntary contributions to education and, in doing so, demonstrated outstanding initiative. To earn this award, the TAFE/FEA member must successfully complete a self-initiated service learning project that focuses on an education-related issue in his or her community and requires a minimum of 40 hours of work. The student must then complete a well-organized portfolio.
    • Project Visualize – A team event – recognizes chapters who illustrate one of their chapter’s projects. The project must be from one of the areas of the TRAFLES – Teaching/Training, Recreation, Appreciation, Fundraising, Leadership, Educational Awareness and Service.
  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to the lesson. For additional information on service learning see
    http://www.ysa.org/

    Possible idea: Create a school wide campaign and Public Service Announcement (PSA) promoting self-awareness and the impact that making good decisions has on one’s future.