More Power To You! The Energy in Food

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Hospitality and Tourism

    Course : Food Science

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (14) The student explains how food provides energy. The student is expected to:
      • (H) determine energy requirements of individuals using multiple variables such as activity level
      • (I) discuss energy imbalances in relationship to weight-related disorders and diseases
      • (J) explain the transfer of energy through a food chain and its relationship to human nutrition
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • determine how many calories are burned during various activities
    • identify the food chain and how it provides energy to food
    • calculate their BMI
    • investigate facts connected to weight-related disorders and diseases
  • Rationale

    Script:

    How do we get the energy we need to dance, jog, run or walk? Where does it come from? If you answered FOOD! You are right, but how much food and how much energy we need is different for everyone. We will calculate our BMI and investigate the relationship between weight-related disorders and diseases and the energy imbalances as we learn more about nutrition.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Five 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Body Mass Index (BMI): A ratio that allows you to assess your body size in relation to your height and weight

    Calorie: A unit of energy supplied by food

    Food chain: The series of processes by which food is grown or produced, sold and eventually consumed

    Nutrients: Substances in food that your body needs to grow, to repair itself, and to supply you with energy

    Obesity: Having an excess amount of body fat

    Overweight: A condition in which a person is heavier than the standard weight range for his or her height

    Physical activity: Any form of movement that causes your body to use energy

    Sedentary lifestyle: A way of life that involves little physical activity

    Underweight: A condition in which a person is less than the standard weight range for his or her height

    Note: Many other terms on the slide presentation can be identified. Encourage students to include the definition in the assignment.

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment

    • computer with projector for multi-media presentations
    • computers with Internet access (be sure to follow school district guidelines)

    • weight scale with height indicator

    Materials

    • images of (magazine or clip art):
      • food (various)
      • physical activity (dancing, jogging, running, swimming, walking)
    • scotch tape

    Supplies:

    • balance scale

    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)

  • Anticipatory Set

    Before class begins:

    Print and cut apart the handout Activities vs. Calories Burned (moderate) and Activities vs. Calories Burned (vigorous) (see All Lesson Attachments tab). The moderate activity cards will be used in the Anticipatory Set and the vigorous activity cards will be used in the Lesson Closure. Each student will receive either an activity card or a calories burned card.

    Display as many items from the Materials or Specialized Equipment Needed tab as you have available on a table in front of the room so that students may view as they enter.

    As students enter the classroom, distribute one card from the Activities vs. Calories Burned (moderate) (see All Lesson Attachments tab) to each.

    Explain to the students that the activities and calories burned are based on a 154- pound male who is 5’ 10” tall.

    Allow students to move around the classroom to try to match the activity to the calories burned. They may tape the cards together to a board or wall and explain their findings.

    Ask the students if they agree or disagree on the calories burned for each activity. Discuss any changes they would make or why they would leave them the way they are.

    Demonstrate how the food intake and physical activity should balance using the balance scale.

    If too much food is eaten and not enough activity is done, an imbalance occurs. The opposite occurs if there is too much activity and not enough food is eaten.

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Select and distribute a handout or graphic organizer from the Instructional Strategies drop down menu in Classroom Essentials or instruct students to take notes in their journal books or on their own paper.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/rgroup/instructional-strategies/

    Distribute the graphic organizer The Food Chain and Nutrition (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that students may complete during slide presentation.

    Introduce the PowerPoint™ More Power To You! The Energy in Food (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Students will be expected to take notes while viewing the slide presentation. Allow time for classroom discussion.

    View the video from the Centers for Disease Control:

    • Finding Balance
      More than one third of U.S. adults are obese. Weight gain occurs when you consume more calories than your body uses. Reaching and maintaining a healthy weight will help you prevent and control many diseases and conditions. The key is FINDING A BALANCE in your lifestyle that includes healthy eating and regular physical activity.
      http://www.cdc.gov/CDCTV/FindingBalance/index.html

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • check for understanding
    • provide a copy of slide presentation

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    If students have access to computers, they can calculate their Body Mass Index (BMI) using the following website:

    • CDC – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
      Healthy Weight – it’s not a diet, it’s a lifestyle!
      BMI Percentile Calculator for Child and Teen
      http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/dnpabmi/

    Allow them to read the results and find out more about their Body Mass Index (BMI).

    If students do not have access to computers, allow them to calculate their Body Mass Index (BMI) using the formula from the CDC website:

    Formula: weight (lb) / [height (in)]2 x 703

    Calculate BMI by dividing weight in pounds (lbs) by height in inches (in) squared and multiplying by a conversion factor of 703.

    Example: Weight = 150 lbs, Height = 5’5” (65”)
    Calculation: [150 ÷ (65)2] x 703 = 24.96


    Distribute the handouts Girls – 2 to 20 years BMI index for age percentiles and Boys – 2 to 20 years BMI index for age percentiles (see All Lesson Attachments tab).

    Simple instructions for calculating the Body Mass Index (BMI) are at the bottom of the small chart. Students should then plot their number on the growth chart with their age.

    Students should then refer to the BMI-for-age Weight Status Categories Chart (see All Lesson Attachments tab) to see their percentile range. This will tell them their weight status category.

    Note: Be discreet with the weight of students and the percentile range.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • strategically place students in groups
    • assist with converting feet to inches in BMI activity

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Distribute the handout, Weight-Related Disorders and Diseases (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Inform students that project assignment may be prepared individually or with a partner.

    Allow students to select one topic from the handout list so that all topics are covered.

    Explain that information will be expected to be retrieved only from reliable sources.

    Reliable sources may include online databases (if your school subscribes):

    • Encyclopedia Britannica
    • World Book Encyclopedia
    • Merck Manual of Medical Information
    • Medline Plus
    • U.S. National Library of Medicine

    Students may present summative information with a visual display that can include a:

    • brochure
    • graphic foldable
    • infographic
    • three- panel presentation board (science board)

    Distribute the handout Rubric for Weight-Related Disorders and Diseases Visual Display (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that students understand what is expected.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • assisting student in gathering information
    • providing praise and encouragement

  • Lesson Closure

    Review the Activities vs. Calories Burned (moderate) activity from the Anticipatory Set.

    Distribute the cards Activities vs. Calories Burned (vigorous) (see All Lesson Attachments tab) to each student and instruct them to find the matching activity for the calories burned. They may tape the cards together to a board and explain their findings.

    Ask the students if they agree or disagree on the calories burned for each activity. Discuss any changes they would make or why they would leave them the way they are.

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Students will be assessed with the appropriate rubric.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • encourage participation in discussion
    • check for understanding

  • References/Resources

    Textbooks:

    • Duyff, R. L. (2010). Food, nutrition & wellness. Columbus, OH: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
    • Food for today. (2010). Woodland Hills, CA: McGrawHill/Glencoe.
    • Mehas, K. Y., & Rodgers, S. L. (2002). Food science: The biochemistry of food and nutrition. New York, NY: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.

    Website:

    Video:

    • Finding Balance
      More than one third of U.S. adults are obese. Weight gain occurs when you consume more calories than your body uses. Reaching and maintaining a healthy weight will help you prevent and control many diseases and conditions. The key is FINDING A BALANCE in your lifestyle that includes healthy eating and regular physical activity.
      http://www.cdc.gov/CDCTV/FindingBalance/index.html
  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • word wall
    • give students time to explain their notes to a partner
    • accomplish research in native language
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Recommended Strategies

    Reading Strategies

    Have students research childhood obesity and develop an opinion on vending machine contents at school.

    Other articles pertaining to this lesson that students may read include:

    Reading Strategy
    Encourage students to “visualize” as they read. Many students are visual learners and will benefit from making sketches or diagrams on scrap paper as they read. Providing students with graphic organizers to help them organize their thoughts is also helpful.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/rgroup/instructional-strategies/page/4/

  • Quotes

    Those who think they have not time for bodily exercise will sooner or later have to find time for illness.
    -Edward Stanley

    A man’s health can be judged by which he takes two at a time – pills or stairs.
    -Joan Welsh

    Lack of activity destroys the good condition of every human being, while movement and methodical physical exercise save it and preserve it.
    -Plato

    Physical fitness can neither be achieved by wishful thinking nor outright purchased.
    -Joseph Pilates

    Physical fitness is not only one of the most important keys to a healthy body, it is the basis of dynamic and creative intellectual activity.
    -John F. Kennedy

  • Multimedia/Visual Strategies

    PowerPoint™:

    • More Power To You! The Energy in Food
    • Presentation Notes – More Power To You! The Energy in Food

    Technology:

    • TED Talks:
      • Food and Fuel in the 21st Century: Stephen Mayfield at TEDxUCSD
        Stephen Mayfield is director of the San Diego Center for Algae Biotechnology, and a Co-director of the Food and Fuel for the 21st Century organized research unit at UC San Diego. He is also the John Doves Isaacs Chair of Natural Philosophy in the department of Biology. His research focuses on the molecular genetics of green algae, and on the production of high value recombinant proteins and biofuel molecules using algae as a production platform.
        http://tedxtalks.ted.com/video/Food-and-Fuel-in-the-21st-Centu

    Files for downloading:

  • Graphic Organizers/Handout

    Handouts:

    • Activity vs. Calories Burned (Key)
    • Activity vs. Calories Burned (moderate)
    • Activity vs. Calories Burned (vigorous)
    • BMI for-Age Weight Status Categories Chart
    • Boy 2 to 20 years BMI index-for-age percentiles
    • Fizzy Yeast
    • Girls 2 to 20 years BMI index-for-age percentiles
    • Rubric for Weight-Related Disorders and Diseases
    • Weight-Related Disorders and Diseases

    Graphic Organizers:

    • The Food Chain and Nutrition
    • The Food Chain and Nutrition (Key)

    Files for downloading:

  • Writing Strategies

    Journal Entries:

    • I feel ____ when I exercise because …
    • My physical activity goal is ____________ because I am concerned about …
    • My BMI is ______________ and that means that I have to …
    • The physical activity that I prefer is __________________ because …
    • To be able to maintain a certain weight, you should …

    Writing Strategy:

    • RAFT (Role/Audience/Format/Topic) writing strategy:
      • Role – physical activity trainer
      • Audience – teenagers
      • Format – flyer
      • Topic – announcement of a new classes at the local gym

    Design a flyer that can be distributed in the community announcing the new classes for teenagers at the local gym.

  • Communication 90 Second Speech Topics

    • Three things about BMI are …
    • The energy requirements for an activity level of ‘vigorous’ are …
  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    Allow students to demonstrate the lab experiment Fizzy Yeast (see All Lesson Attachments tab) if time permits.

    Students will be able to view how food generates energy.

    Infographic:

    Infographics are graphic visual representations of information, data or knowledge intended to present complex information quickly and clearly.

    The infographic below is related to this lesson. Allow students to view the image on a projector and lead a discussion concerning the information provided.

    TED Talks:

    TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event.

    The video below is related to this lesson. Allow students to view the video and lead a discussion concerning the TED Talk.

    • Food and Fuel in the 21st Century: Stephen Mayfield at TEDxUCSD
      Stephen Mayfield is director of the San Diego Center for Algae Biotechnology, and a Co-director of the Food and Fuel for the 21st Century organized research unit at UC San Diego. He is also the John Doves Isaacs Chair of Natural Philosophy in the department of Biology. His research focuses on the molecular genetics of green algae, and on the production of high value recombinant proteins and biofuel molecules using algae as a production platform.
      http://tedxtalks.ted.com/video/Food-and-Fuel-in-the-21st-Centu
  • Family/Community Connection

    Encourage students to try one or more of the suggestions below:

    • organize a family exercise time
    • prepare a well-balanced meal for the family
    • participate in a walk-a-thon or race as a family to benefit the prevention of weight-related eating diseases and disorders

  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)

    http://www.texasfccla.org

    • National Programs in Action
      An individual or team event that recognizes participants who explain how the planning process was used to implement a national program project. Participants must prepare a file folder containing specified summary documents, an oral presentation describing the use of the planning process and visuals.
    • Nutrition and Wellness
      An individual event, recognizes participants who track food intake and physical activity for themselves, their family or a community group and determine goals and strategies for improving their overall health. Participants must prepare a portfolio and an oral presentation.
    • Student Body
      The FCCLA Student Body national peer education program helps young people learn to eat right, be fit, and make healthy choices. Its goals are to: help young people make informed, responsible decisions about their health, provide youth opportunities to teach others and develop healthy lifestyles, as well as communication and leadership skills.
  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to this lesson.
    www.ysa.org

    Possible Idea:

    • Students may organize an after school exercise program that would target young sedentary teenagers.

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