Managing Multiple Roles

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Human Services

    Course : Interpersonal Studies

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (7) The student determines methods that promote an effective family unit. The student is expected to:
      • (F) explain how technology influences family functions and relationships
    • (13) The student analyzes management practices facilitating individuals assuming multiple family, community and wage-earner roles. The student is expected to:
      • (A) determine the impact of career choice on family life
      • (B) describe the effect of family life on workplace productivity
      • (C) determine employment practices and trends that support families
      • (D) explain how technology impacts career options and family roles
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • understand the challenges of working and raising a family
    • discover options available to working personnel that support families
    • review the management practices one could use to overcome family and work stresses
    • analyze how technology impacts the family, career options and relationships
  • Rationale

    Script:

    The family structure has changed in so many ways throughout the years. How does an individual blend working and taking care of the needs of his or her family? How do employment trends impact the family? What are the realities of the workplace? In order to achieve family, community and career roles, we need to employ techniques for managing family and work. How many of you want to have a career and a family? Have you thought about how to balance it all? Both career and family require a lot of your time and attention. Let’s learn how to juggle all of these responsibilities successfully.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Four 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Androgyny: A less rigid definition of femininity and masculinity; gender bending

    Benefits: Various non-wage compensations provided to employees in addition to their normal wages to increase the economic security of staff members and improve worker retention across the organization

    Bluetooth technology: A wireless communications system intended to replace the cables connecting portable and/or fixed electronic devices

    Chat: Communication between two people using a computer

    Flextime: Allows an employee to select the hours he or she will work, usually with specified limits set by the employer

    Group medical (or dental) insurance: A contract between an insurance provider (for example, an insurance company or a government) and an individual or his/her sponsor (for example, an employer or a community organization)

    Lactation room: An on-site room where nursing mothers of newborns can go to nurse or pump breast milk for their babies

    Leave pool: An optional benefit in which employees give up a day or two of their vacation time to allow employees in need to request additional vacation days to be used for family emergencies or illness

    Life choices: The options available to us when making decisions about our lives

    Management practices: Strategies one would use to help organize and evaluate decisions to be made

    On-site child care: An on-site child care program offered to employees to allow children to be near their working parents, thus promoting both family and career

    Telecommuting: A work arrangement in which employees do not commute to a central place of work

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • classroom telephone for contacting businesses or personal cell phones (be sure to abide by school guidelines)
    • computers with Internet access (be sure to follow district guidelines for Internet access)
    • computer with projector for PowerPoint™ presentation

    Materials:

    • baby doll
    • bag of groceries
    • briefcase
    • calendar
    • cell phone
    • day care pamphlets
    • diaper bag filled with baby necessities
    • expired ATM card
    • headsets
    • iPad
    • iPhone
    • large clock
    • name badge
    • soccer ball
    • stack of bills
    • stack of play money
    • toy airplane

    Supplies:

    • basket
    • cardstock

    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Anticipatory Set

    Prior to class:

    Refer to additional Interpersonal Studies lessons for additional resources:

    Financial Obligations Throughout the Family Life Cycle
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/financial-obligations-throughout-the-family-life-cycle/

    Understanding Family Dynamics
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/understanding-family-dynamics/

    The Impact of Technology on the Family Life Cycle
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/the-impact-of-technology-on-the-family-life-cycle/

    Print and cut apart the Life Choices Scenario Cards on cardstock (see All Lesson Attachments tab). The cards will be placed in a basket and used in an activity during Guided Practice. Some cards have been left blank so that other scenarios may be added.

    Display as many of the lesson-related materials (see Materials or Specialized Equipment Needed) as you have available on a table in front of the room.

    Become familiar with PowerPoint™, handouts and activities.

    Before class begins:

    On a table at the front of the room, arrange a display of life choices. Examples could include choices of career and family. Possible items for career could be: a briefcase, stack of play money, name badge, calendar, toy airplane or large clock. Possible items for family could be: a baby doll, soccer ball, stack of bills, grocery bag of food, day care pamphlets or diaper bag.

    Allow students to observe the items and think about their own future. Ask them the following questions:

    • Do you see any of these items in your future?
    • What three items would you choose to put into your future? Why?
    • What item(s) do you not want to deal with in your future? Why?
    • Will the items change as you get older? How and why?
    • How can technology influence family functions and relationships?
    • If you were the head of a household which included two teenage children, what challenges would there be working full-time and raising a family?
    • What skills or techniques could an individual use to overcome family and work stresses?

    Allow for questions and discussion.

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Distribute graphic organizer Managing Multiple Roles Note-taking (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that students may take notes during the slide presentation.

    Introduce slide presentation Managing Multiple Roles (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and discuss trends that affect life choices. Allow for questions and answers to check for understanding.

    Using Managing Multiple Roles Note-taking (see All Lesson Attachments tab), students will have an opportunity to reflect, review and respond to the information pertaining to the PowerPoint™. They will write a summary of questions, topics or statements which reflect the information from the lesson:

    • Discuss the topic
    • Write down your thoughts
    • Make a real-world connection to the lesson
    • How is this going to help you in the future?

    Allow for questions and answers to check for understanding.

    Discuss with the class that making their own life choices will involve making important decisions in the areas of planning, organization and responsibility. Distribute A to Z of Life Choices (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout. Students will determine a life choice they might make in the future that starts with each letter in the alphabet. Allow for sharing of information and questions. Check for understanding.

    Option: If your district permits, I would highly recommend that you show snippets of the movie Click, starring Adam Sandler. This is a fictional story about a man who uses a remote control to manipulate his life. Ultimately, he “fast-forwards” over simple things in life and ends up missing out on great memories and quality time with his family. You could also assign viewing the movie at home for an extra credit grade. Students can write a summary over the message of the movie and the life choices that the main character made. This movie directly relates to TEKS 7F and 13D on how technology influences work and relationships.

    Videos included in the PowerPoint™:

    • StoryCorps Shorts: The Icing on the Cake
      Blanca Alvarez and her husband risked crossing the border to immigrate to the United States, and then struggled to make ends meet. They hoped to shelter their children from these harsh realities, but Blanca’s daughter Connie reveals how much children can really see of their parents’ lives — and the inspiration they draw from their parents’ struggles. (2 minutes)
      http://www.pbs.org/pov/icingonthecake/

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • checking for understanding
    • providing assistance with note-taking/graphic organizer
  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Place the Life Choices Scenario Cards (see All Lesson Attachments tab) cards in a basket. Some cards have been left blank so that other scenarios may be added. Distribute graphic organizer, Life Choices: Pros and Cons (see All Lesson Attachments tab), and have students draw a card from the basket. Students will determine the pros and cons of the scenario. They must include how technology could enhance both the pros and cons of the scenario.

    Divide the class into groups of two, and allow one person from each group to pick a card from the basket.

    Students should brainstorm possible solutions to the scenarios and document their ideas on the graphic organizer.

    Solutions to the conflict scenarios will be presented in the Lesson Closure section.

    Example: Career: General manager of a major hotel chain

    • Long hours and some traveling are a requirement for this position
    • You are married with two children, ages 5 and 8
    • Your spouse has been offered a good position at a computer company as a chief executive
    • Your elderly parents live with you; your father has heart problems and your mother is confined to a wheelchair

    Together as a class, discuss and write down the pros and cons of the scenario.

    • Pros – Get to see other places, earn airline miles and feel a sense of contribution to company/career. Spouse’s new job could benefit the family
    • Cons – Have to be away from family and home and get behind on responsibilities at home. If spouse went to work, who would take care of the elderly parents?

    Discuss how technology could enhance both the pros and cons of this decision.

    • Technology – One could use Face time to attend off-site meetings, make conference calls, use online means to connect with family members, e-mail or text pictures of family activities that were missed.

    Allow the students to work together. Check for understanding.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • allowing students extra time to complete the assignment
    • providing fill-in-the-blank note handouts for students to follow and fill in during the lesson
    • pairing students with elbow partners who can assist them with verbal and written responses to the lesson

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Distribute Employment Practices and Trends That Support Families (see All Lesson Attachments tab).
    Students will research a company, similar to the card they drew during Guided Practice, and contact the human resources department and/or use the Internet to gather information. The students also have the option to research a company they are interested in working for. For example: General manager of a major department store. Students can contact a major store in your community.

    Students will research the options available to employees who work and also have families. Questions to consider are:

    • Are there flexible work schedules?
    • Does the company have time sharing?
    • Is there an on-site day care?
    • What are the policies on maternity leave? Paternity leave?
    • Does the company have a flex account for child care?
    • What other family-oriented benefits are available at the researched company?
    • How does the use of technology enhance working for this company?

    Students will identify five additional questions to include in their research.

    A one-page paper will be written explaining the benefits, or lack of benefits, to employees with families. In the closing statement, the student will state whether the researched company would be a good place to work for someone with a family. The student will decide if he or she would like to work for this company or not.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • assisting students in gathering information
    • providing praise and encouragement

  • Lesson Closure

    Review lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Each group can discuss the scenarios that they chose and how they solved them.

    End each class with management practices (strategies) students can use to evaluate and make the best decisions for their future.

    • Pro/Con list
    • Internet research
    • Asking for advice from mentor
    • Communication with family
    • Asking job for options in flexible work schedule
    • Using community and neighbors as a source of support
  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    The students will write a one-page summary analyzing the factors involved in managing multiple roles. Students will reflect on how the lesson, activities and information will assist them in the future. The reflection and various handouts will be submitted for assessment.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • grading according to amount of work completed
    • providing constant praise and encouragement

  • References/Resources

    Images:

    • Microsoft Clip Art: Used with permission from Microsoft.

    Textbook:

    • Johnson, L. (2010). Strengthening family & self. (6th ed.). Tinley Park, Illinois: The Goodheart-Willcox Company. Inc.

    Videos:

    • Click. Copyright 2006, Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc.
      This video is directly related to the TEKS in this lesson. The story is about a man who makes choices in life, family and career based on using a remote to fast-forward through certain periods of time.
    • StoryCorps Shorts: The Icing on the Cake
      Blanca Alvarez and her husband risked crossing the border to immigrate to the United States, and then struggled to make ends meet. They hoped to shelter their children from these harsh realities, but Blanca’s daughter Connie reveals how much children can really see of their parents’ lives — and the inspiration they draw from their parents’ struggles.
      http://www.pbs.org/pov/icingonthecake/

    Websites:

    YouTube™:

  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • Ask students to repeat your instructions back to you to be sure they know what is expected of them before each new phase of the lesson.
    • Discuss vocabulary in detail and make sure everyone has a firm grasp on it before moving forward with the lesson.
    • Use graphic organizers and visuals to explain the lesson in detail.
    • Utilize Four Corners Vocabulary/Word Wall Activity
      http://cte.sfasu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/Four-Corner-Vocabulary2.pdf
    • Have students say and write the vocabulary words in their primary languages.
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Recommended Strategies

    Reading Strategies

    Current Events:
    Assign students to read about the factors involved in achieving family, community and career roles. Information can be found in newspaper articles, magazines, journals and online print.
    Suggestions:

    • Bureau of Labor Statistics
      Working in the 21st Century is a portrait of the U.S. workforce at the beginning of the New Millennium: a set of charts and related information about subjects ranging from education levels to retirement plans.
      http://www.bls.gov/opub/working/home.htm
    • Center on Media and Human Development School of Communication Northwestern University Parenting in the Age of Digital Technology: A National Survey (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
    • Forum on Child and Family Statistics
      The Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics, or the Forum, is a working group of federal agencies that collect, analyze and report data on issues related to children and families. The Forum has partners from 22 federal agencies as well as partners in private research organizations
      http://www.childstats.gov/americaschildren/famsoc3.asp
    • Encourage students to “make predictions” about the text content prior to reading. “I think it’s going to be about…” This encourages active reading and keeps the student interested.
  • Quotes

    If you limit your choices only to what seems possible or reasonable, you disconnect yourself from what you truly want, and all that is left is a compromise.
    -Robert Fritz

    It’s choice – not chance – that determines your destiny.
    -Jean Nidetch

    It is amazing how quickly the kids learn to drive a car, yet are unable to understand the lawnmower, snowblower or vacuum cleaner.
    -Ben Bergor

    Rejoice with your family in the beautiful land of life!
    -Albert Einstein

  • Multimedia/Visual Strategies

    Power Point™

    • Managing Multiple Roles
    • Presentation Notes for Managing Multiple Roles

    TED Talk:

    Steven Addis: A father-daughter bond, one photo at a time
    A long time ago in New York City, Steve Addis stood on a corner holding his 1-year-old daughter in his arms; his wife snapped a photo. The image has inspired an annual father-daughter ritual, where Addis and his daughter pose for the same picture, on the same corner, each year.
    http://youtu.be/txxOrXPNzpo

    Videos:

    • Click. Copyright 2006, Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc.
    • StoryCorps Shorts: The Icing on the Cake
      Blanca Alvarez and her husband risked crossing the border to immigrate to the United States, and then struggled to make ends meet. They hoped to shelter their children from these harsh realities, but Blanca’s daughter Connie reveals how much children can really see of their parents’ lives — and the inspiration they draw from their parents’ struggles.
      http://www.pbs.org/pov/icingonthecake/

    YouTube™:

    Files for downloading:

  • Graphic Organizers/Handout

    Graphic Organizer:

    • Life Choices: Pros and Cons
    • Managing Multiple Roles Note-taking

    Handouts:

    • A to Z of Life Choices
    • Balancing Multiple Roles
    • Employment Practices and Trends That Support Families
    • Life Choices Scenario Cards
    • Managing Family, Community and Career Roles Panel Questions
    • Parenting in the Age of Digital Technology: A National Survey

    Files for downloading:

  • Writing Strategies

    Journal Entries:

    • I will be able to juggle responsibilities of work and family by _____________.
    • For important life choices, I will seek advice from a mentor. This person is ______________because he/she has the qualities of __________________.

    Writing Strategies:

    RAFT writing strategy

    Role: Student
    Audience: Adult friend
    Format: Informal letter
    Topic: Students will write a letter to an adult friend asking about the family-friendly benefits that his or her company offers. Ask the adult friend what benefits he or she wishes would be available at his or her place of employment. This activity will allow students to hear from people who they know and trust about what is really important when it comes to work and family issues.

  • Communication 90 Second Speech Topics

    • Why is organization of time, resources and responsibilities so important to a person with a career and a family?
    • What are some of the family-friendly benefits you would like to see in your place of employment?
    • Why should companies strive to support employees with families by offering family-friendly benefits?
  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    • Distribute Balancing Multiple Roles (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout. Students will interview an employed individual with a family.
    • Develop a checklist about household work and how it can improve family relationships and strengthen communication.
    • Utilize the Internet to locate articles about balancing work and family life. Summarize the information from the articles into a brochure or fact sheet.

    TED Talks:

    TED is a nonprofit organization devoted to spreading ideas, usually in the form of short, powerful talks (18 minutes or fewer). The video below is related to this lesson. Allow students to view the video and lead a discussion concerning the TED Talk.

    Steven Addis: A father-daughter bond, one photo at a time
    A long time ago in New York City, Steve Addis stood on a corner holding his 1-year-old daughter in his arms; his wife snapped a photo. The image has inspired an annual father-daughter ritual, where Addis and his daughter pose for the same picture, on the same corner, each year.
    http://youtu.be/txxOrXPNzpo

  • Family/Community Connection

    • Invite a panel to come to the classroom to discuss work and family roles and responsibilities. Distribute Managing Family, Community and Career Roles Panel Questions (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout. Give the panel members the list of questions. Panel could consist of parents, community leaders, teachers, grandparents, city council members and/or various career-oriented people. Have students directly interact with the panel by asking the members questions about things to think about when making decisions for their future.
    • Brainstorm ways that the community or neighbors could help lend support to career people with families. Research community resources that are available.
      Examples of sources are: YMCA, Boys and Girls Clubs of America, child care co-ops or neighborhood meal sharing co-ops.
    • Interview a working parent on managing work and a family using Balancing Multiple Roles (see All Lesson Attachments tab).
  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)
    hppt://texasfccla.org

    STAR Events:

    • Applied Technology – An individual or team event that recognizes participants who develop a project using technology that addresses a concern related to Family and Consumer Sciences and/or related occupations. The project integrates and applies content from academic subjects.
    • Chapter Service Project (Display and Manual) – A team event that recognizes chapters that develop and implement an in-depth service project that makes a worthwhile contribution to families, schools and communities. Students must use Family and Consumer Science content and skills to address and take action on a community need (such as a neighborhood childcare or meal sharing co-op).
  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to consider ideas about service projects pertaining to lesson.
    http://www.ysa.org/

    Possible idea:

    Create and organize a community or neighborhood co-op that will benefit working families. See Family/Community connections.

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