Leadership Today – Making the Right Decisions

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Human Services

    Course : Principles of Human Services

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (1) The student demonstrates personal characteristics for success in high-skill, high-wage, or high-demand careers. The student is expected to:
      • (A) explain and practice responsible decision-making consistent with personal needs, wants, values and priorities
      • (C) describe personal management skills needed for productivity such as time and energy
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • apply the decision-making process in alignment with values and priorities
    • demonstrate leadership skills
    • identify personal management skills
  • Rationale

    Script:

    Have any of you ever held a leadership position in a club or other organization? One of the qualities of being a good leader is the ability to make good decisions. Making wise decisions and having good leadership skills go hand in hand. Today we are going to learn about leadership and decision-making skills. In preparation for careers in the field of Human Sciences, it is important to understand how these skills will benefit you at the workplace.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Three 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Authoritarian: Expecting or requiring people to obey rules or laws; not allowing personal freedom

    Decision: A choice made about something after thinking about it : the result of deciding

    Democratic: Relating to the idea that all people should be treated equally

    Laissez-faire: A philosophy or practice characterized by a usually deliberate abstention from direction or interference especially with individual freedom of choice and action

    Leader: A person who has commanding authority or influence

    Leadership: A position as a leader of a group or organization

    Needs: The lack of something wanted or deemed necessary

    Priority: Something given specified attention

    Values: Principles or standards of behavior

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for PowerPoint™ presentation
    • computers with Internet access (be sure to follow district guidelines)

    Materials:

    • crayons, markers or colored pencils
    • scissors

    Supplies:

    • deck of cards (one set per group)
    • jar or container
    • paper/pen
    • sheets of colored paper (red, blue, yellow, green and orange) Refer to Teacher Resource – Exploring Your Values and Priorities (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout for further instructions.
    • timer or use Online Stopwatch www.online-stopwatch.com

    Prepare ten sheets with one quote each on the topic of leadership to place around the room prior to the Anticipatory Set segment of the lesson. See Quotes section of lesson for four leadership quotes. You may also create a slide presentation with these types of quotes and have it looping as students enter the classroom. Additional quotes can be found at:
    http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/topics/topic_leadership.html

    Print and cut apart the topics on Teacher Resource – Thinking on Your Feet (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Place strips of the topics in a container to be used during Guided Practice.

    Other appropriate lesson

    Follow the Leader
    Family and Community Services
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/follow-the-leader/

    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Anticipatory Set

    Prior to class:

    Post a variety of quotes on the topic of leadership around the room (see Materials or Specialized Equipment Needed).

    As the students enter, instruct them to walk around the classroom and read the posted quotes. Have the them stand by the quote that best shows their leadership values.

    One by one, allow students to explain why the quote is relevant to them.

    Distribute handout The FCCLA Planning Process (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and review the decision making process.

    Possible questions for discussion:

    • Why is it important to have plenty of information before making decisions?
    • How do your values and priorities impact your decision making skills?
  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Note to teacher: Prior to beginning this lesson, please review, preview and select the appropriate multimedia for your classes.

    Introduce objectives, terms and definitions.

    Introduce the PowerPoint™, Leadership Today – Making the Right Decisions, (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Distribute the Note-taking on Leadership Today – Making the Right Decisions (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout. Inform students that they will be expected to take notes and participate in discussions while viewing the slide presentation.

    Use appropriate notes from Presentation Notes for Leadership Today – Making the Right Decisions (see All Lesson Attachments tab) for discussion.

    Teacher note: Distribute the Your Leadership Characteristics (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout prior to slide 9 of the presentation. See slide 9 for handout instructions.

    Once activity is completed, continue with the viewing of slide presentation.

    After viewing the slide presentation, distribute the handout, What It Takes to Be a Leader (see All Lesson Attachments tab). In the left column, students will list six leadership qualities they think an individual should possess. They will explain the importance of each leadership quality. Under the column “In school”, students will place a check mark next to the leadership qualities that they think school leaders should possess. They will do the same for the workplace column. Allow for discussion.

    Possible questions for discussion:

    • Do all leadership roles require the same qualities? Why or why not?
    • How can leadership positions in school or at the workplace affect your future roles? How can they affect your decision-making skills?
    • How do leaders develop and demonstrate their leadership qualities?

    Videos included in the slide presentation:

    • Soft Skills-Leadership and Management
      It’s one thing to know the ins and outs of your industry and profession. But you can’t be an effective leader and drive change in your field without soft skills. This episode of ASQ TV describes what soft skills are and how mastering them will help you succeed.
      http://youtu.be/qALa8sjvCTc
    • Top Five Characteristics: Leadership
      Professor Samuel Bacharach discusses the five leadership traits leaders need to see their agendas through to fruition and make a lasting impact in their organization.
      http://youtu.be/EMgElizP_Q0

    Individual Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but not limited to:

    • checking for understanding
    • providing assistance with note-taking
    • providing a peer to read material instructions
    • providing a copy of slide presentation with highlighted words and definitions

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    On a table, set up the items needed for problem-solving initiative and leadership activities:

    • deck of cards
    • jar/container with topic strips
    • paper/pen
    • timer

    Inform students that in today’s lesson, they will participate in leadership-related activities. Distribute handout, Leadership Initiative Games (see All Lesson Attachments tab).

    • Provide instructions for game #1
    • Allow for student participation
    • After activity, lead discussion with debriefing questions
    • Repeat the process for each activity

    The leadership activities include, but are not limited to:

    • People Scavenger Hunt
    • Thinking on Your Feet
    • Card Shuffle

    Teacher note: Refer to Assisting ALL Students In Developing Leadership Skills for additional activities and ideas at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/Assisting-All-Students-in-Developing-Leaderhship-Skills.pdf

    Possible questions for discussion:

    • Who was the leader of your group?
    • What style of leadership was displayed?
    • Do you see yourself more as a leader or follower?
    • Are you more comfortable as a leader or follower?

    Individual Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but not limited to:

    • checking for understanding
    • providing a peer to read materials
    • providing oral responses

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Before proceeding with this activity, review the definition of values and priorities. You may opt to share your own personal values and priorities as a teacher or as an individual.

    The focus of this activity will be on identifying values and priorities. Use the Teacher Resource – Exploring Your Values and Priorities (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout to guide the students through the activity. Refer to the photos for clarification:

    color

    notebook

    colored pencils

    Inform students that this is a personal activity and to keep the talking to a minimum. They are to reflect personally on their values and priorities and what is important to them.

    For this activity, each student will need four 2 x 2 inch squares in five different colors, for a total of 20 squares.

    See Teacher Resource – Exploring Your Values and Priorities (see All Lesson Attachments tab) for more detailed instructions. If you do not have colored paper, you may use notebook paper as shown on the handout. Instruct the students to fold and cut their paper. Each student should have a total of 20 pieces of paper. If the students are not using colored paper, distribute crayons, markers or colored pencils to differentiate . Each student will need a blue, red, yellow, green and orange writing tool.

    Follow the script on Teacher Resource – Exploring Your Values and Priorities. This activity will allows students to determine their true values and priorities.

    After the activity, distribute Questions – Exploring Your Values and Priorities (see All Lesson Attachments tab). The students will answer the following questions on the handout.

    • What values remained on your desk or table?
    • Why are those values important to you?
    • Was this activity relatively easy for you? Explain your answer.
    • Which values were the easiest to eliminate? The hardest to eliminate?
    • What did you learn from this activity? What did you learn about yourself?
    • How will your list of values affect your life? How will your list of values influence the development of your leadership skills?
    • What difficult choices do you think you may have to make as you get older?
    • What are some possible life events that could occur and may cause you to re-evaluate your values?
    • How might you prepare to make difficult choices in the future?
    • Do you think your values will change in five, ten, twenty years from now? How?

    Orally, students may share what they have learned about themselves. Allow for questions and discussion.

    After the students have answered the questions and determined their true values and priorities, students will make a decision based on their ultimate values and priorities. Distribute handout, Steps to Making a Decision, (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Have students think of something that is important to them and requires them to make a decision. It can be a short-term or long-term goal. Instruct students to use the decision-making process by writing the five steps along with an explanation. Explain that making a responsible decision needs to be consistent with personal needs, wants, values and priorities.

    On the back of the handout, students will answer the following questions:

    • If you do not use the decision-making process, what could be some other possible outcomes?
    • How was your decision based on your personal needs, wants, values and priorities?

    Allow for questions and discussion.

    Individual Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but not limited to:

    • checking for understanding
    • shortened, simplified instructions
    • providing oral responses

  • Lesson Closure

    Review objectives, terms, and definitions.

    Distribute the Three W’s of Review (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout. Students will complete the following information:

    • What did you learn today?
    • So What – is the relevancy, importance or usefulness of the lesson?
    • Now What? How does the information from the lesson align with what we are learning? How does it affect your thinking? How will it affect your future?

    Possible questions for review:

    • What are two steps in becoming a good leader?
    • What are the steps in the FCCLA Planning Process?
    • Why is it important to follow up in the decision-making process?
    • What qualities of leader do you possess?
    • What are two characteristics of a democratic leader?
    • What are two characteristics of an authoritarian leader?
    • What are two characteristics of a laissez-faire leader?
    • What is some information you need to know about making a decision?
    • What are values?
    • How do needs and wants differ?
  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    All students will write a one-page personal reflection on what they learned from this lesson and how they plan to use this information now and in the future.

    Individual Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but not limited to:

    • checking for understanding
    • shortened assignment
    • providing extra time
    • providing oral responses

  • References/Resources

    Images:

    • Photos obtained through a license with Shutterstock.com™.

    Textbook:

    • Ryder, Verdene, and Marjorie Harter B. Contemporary Living. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox, 2010.

    Websites:

    YouTube™:

    • Soft Skills-Leadership and Management
      It’s one thing to know the ins and outs of your industry and profession. But you can’t be an effective leader and drive change in your field without soft skills. This episode of ASQ TV describes what soft skills are and how mastering them will help you succeed.
      http://youtu.be/qALa8sjvCTc
    • Top Five Characteristics: Leadership
      Professor Samuel Bacharach discusses the five leadership traits leaders need to see their agendas through to fruition and make a lasting impact in their organization.
      http://youtu.be/EMgElizP_Q0
  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • word wall
    • draw visual representation of term on word wall
    • add terms and definitions to personal dictionary
    • check for understanding
    • students repeat instructions
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Recommended Strategies

    Reading Strategies

    Current Events:
    Assign students to read about the importance on leadership skills. Information can be found in newspaper articles, magazines, journals and online print.
    Suggestions:

    • The 6 Most Important Decisions You’ll Ever Make: A Guide for Teens by Sean Covey
    • The Five Habits of Mind that Self-Made Billionaires Possess
      Self-made billionaires think differently than most of us do. They excel at optimizing within known systems.
      http://www.leadershipnow.com/leadingblog/
    • Encourage students to “visualize” as they read. May students are visual learners and will benefit from making sketches or diagrams on scratch paper as they read. Providing students with graphic organizers to help them organize their thoughts is also helpful.
    • Students may read blogs about leadership to compare and contrast the differences.
  • Quotes

    Do not follow where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.
    -Harold R. McAlindon

    Life is the sum of all your choices.
    -Albert Camus

    Leadership is the art of getting someone else to do something you want done because he wants to do it.
    -Dwight Eisenhower

    The best executive is the one who has sense enough to pick good men to do what he wants done, and self-restraint to keep from meddling with them while they do it.
    -Theodore Roosevelt

  • Multimedia/Visual Strategies

    PowerPoint™:

    • Leadership Today – Making the Right Decisions
    • Presentation notes for Leadership Today – Making the Right Decisions

    Technology:

    YouTube™:

    • Soft Skills-Leadership and Management
      It’s one thing to know the ins and outs of your industry and profession. But you can’t be an effective leader and drive change in your field without soft skills. This episode of ASQ TV describes what soft skills are and how mastering them will help you succeed.
      http://youtu.be/qALa8sjvCTc
    • Top Five Characteristics: Leadership
      Professor Samuel Bacharach discusses the five leadership traits leaders need to see their agendas through to fruition and make a lasting impact in their organization.
      http://youtu.be/EMgElizP_Q0

    Files for downloading:

  • Graphic Organizers/Handout

    Graphic Organizer:

    • Note-taking on Leadership Today – Making the Right Decisions
    • Three W’s of Review

    Handouts:

    • FCCLA Planning Process
    • Leadership Roles and Qualities Report
    • Leadership Initiative Games
    • People Scavenger Hunt
    • Questions – Exploring Your Values and Priorities
    • Steps to Making a Decision
    • Teacher Resource – Exploring Your Values and Priorities
    • Teacher Resource – Thinking on Your Feet
    • What Does It Take to Be a Leader?
    • Your Leadership Characteristics

    Files for downloading:

  • Writing Strategies

    Journal Entries:

    • I think I am a good leader because _________________________.
    • A good leader is someone who _____________________________.
    • My needs and wants are ___________________________________.

    Writing Strategy:

    • RAFT (Role/Audience/Format/Topic) writing strategy:
      Role: High school student
      Audience: Elementary student
      Format: Letter
      Topic: How to be a great leader
  • Communication 90 Second Speech Topics

    • A good leader is __________________ because ________________________.
    • The differences between needs and wants are __________________.
    • My leadership style is _____________________.
  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    • Have students choose a state, national or international leader to research to obtain information about the types of leadership qualities that individual possesses and possibly how those qualities were obtained. Distribute Leadership Roles and Qualities Report (see All Lesson Attachments tab) as a sample of questions to facilitate the research. You may opt to have the students present the information in an oral presentation to the class members. Lead a discussion as to why each leadership quality presented is important for effective leadership.
    • Lead students to work in pairs or groups to “draw” a picture of an effective leader. Give sufficient time for this activity, and then have the students present their leaders to the class. Have student share why they drew what they did and what characteristics of effective leadership were portrayed in their pictures. Discuss why these characteristics would be important for leadership in the community and in the voluntary sector.
    • Assign students to visit local Leaders Clubs in the school or surrounding school community such as NHS (National Honor Society) or Boys and Girls Club to make observations on what type of leadership qualities are encouraged and how decisions are made.

    TED Talks:

    TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks videos and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event.

    The video below is related to this lesson. Allow students to view the video and lead a discussion concerning the TED Talk.

    Fields Wicker-Miurin: Learning from leadership’s missing manual
    Leadership doesn’t have a user’s manual, but Fields Wicker-Miurin says stories of remarkable, local leaders are the next best thing. At a TED salon in London, she shares three.
    http://www.ted.com/talks/fields_wicker_miurin_learning_from_leadership_s_missing_manual

  • Family/Community Connection

    • Have students brainstorm ways in which they can be leaders in their school. The class will determine one way that they as a class can be leaders in the school and follow through with the activity/idea.
    • Invite a local community leader such as a City Council member to be a guest speaker to all the Family Consumer Sciences classes. The speaker could inform the students on the type of skills needed to be an effective city government leader in their local town or city.
  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)

    http://texasfccla.org

    The FCCLA Dynamic Leadership helps young people build leadership skills. It provides information, activities, and project ideas to help young people:

    • learn about leadership
    • recognize the lifelong benefits of leadership skills
    • practice leadership skills through FCCLA involvement
    • become strong leaders for families, careers, and communities.

    STAR Event:

    Leadership – An individual event, recognizes participants who actively evaluate and grow in their leadership potential. Participants use the Student Leadership Challenge and supporting materials, to investigate their leadership ability and develop a mentorship relationship to further their leadership development. Participants must prepare a portfolio and an oral presentation.

  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to lesson. For additional information on service learning see:
    http://www.nylc.org/

    Possible idea:
    Lending a Helping Hand in the Community

    • Students will research what families need that lose their homes in a fire.
    • Students will identify the needs of the families by contacting a family service agency such as the Red Cross. The students contact the general manager to discuss the service learning project.
    • The students will determine what the needs of the families are and conduct an assistance drive (socks, pants, t-shirts, shoes and blankets) to donate to the families. The students will conduct a research of the family service agency. How will they get the items collected to the needy families? They will also research transportation needs, costs, method of collecting the items they need, timeline for project and delivery of needed items.
    • They will list the materials, costs and resources for the project. Students will determine roles and responsibilities of the project.
    • Schedule the trip and make the necessary arrangements at school.
    • Deliver all the items that were collected.
    • Volunteer their time and energy at the family service agency.

    As a reflection, they students will evaluate how their leadership and decision making skills aided them in the project. Do they feel they made an impact at the community venue and school? Compare the impact the project made on class members before they started the project and after the project was completed. Did the project achieve its purpose? What might you do differently next time?

    What did you gain from this experience and contribution including both in learning and in the service?
    Written reflection on what they learned from the experience and how this knowledge will help them in the future.

    Note: Depending on the nature of events that have taken place in a town or city, the students can organize similar types of drives to meet the needs of their local or surrounding community.

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