Laws and Regulations in the Food Service Industry

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Hospitality and Tourism

    Course : Practicum in Culinary Arts

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (5) The student applies ethical behavior standards and legal responsibilities within the workplace. The student is expected to:
      • (A) research and compare published workplace policies
      • (C) summarize provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act
      • (E) research laws related to culinary arts professions
    • (8) The student evaluates personal attitudes and work habits that support career retention and advancement. The student is expected to:
      • (E) summarize the rights and responsibilities of employers and employees
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • analyze the Fair Labor Standards Act
    • research federal laws and state regulations related to the food service industry
    • compare and contrast code of ethics for various venues
    • understand the rights and responsibilities of employees and employers
  • Rationale

    Laws and regulations in the food service industry affect workers every day. Knowing these laws and regulations helps employees and employers understand their rights and responsibilities and makes for a safer workplace.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Five 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Age Discrimination in Employment Act: Protects people 40 years of age and older from being discriminated against in any aspect of employment

    Americans with Disabilities Act: Prevents employers from refusing to hire or promote disabled persons, and ensures that all employees are treated equally

    Civil Rights Act: Employers may not discriminate based on race, color, national origin, sex, or religion

    Equal Employment Opportunities Act: Requires businesses to have affirmative action programs

    Immigration Reform and Control Act: Only United States citizens and people who are authorized to work in the United States may be legally hired

    Immigration and Nationality Act: Prevents employers from hiring immigrants for low-skill, low-paying jobs without providing them with pension or insurance benefits

    Federal Employment Compensation Act: Protects employees who are injured or disabled due to work-related accidents

    Law: An established rule

    Minimum wage: The lowest hourly rate of pay that employees can be paid legally

    Regulation: A rule by which government agencies enforce minimum standards of quality

    Workweek: A period of 168 hours during seven consecutive 24-hour periods

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with Internet for multimedia presentations
    • computers with access to Internet (be sure to follow school district guidelines)

    Materials:

    • cardstock
    • posters (one copy each)
      • EEOC is the Law Poster supplement
      • Family and Medical Leave Act
      • I Have Rights Teen Poster
      • Minimum Wage Poster
      • Overtime Pay Requirement
      • Youth Minimum Wage – Fair Labor Standards Act
    • Youth Rules! bookmark (several copies)

    Supplies:

    • employee handbooks (borrowed from students who are employed in various food industry related jobs)
    • Teacher handbook

    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)

  • Anticipatory Set

    Before class begins:

    Print copies of posters listed in the Materials or Specialized Equipment Needed section and place on a table in the front of the classroom. Allow students to view these as they walk into the room.

    Distribute handout KWL – Laws and Regulations in the Food Industry (see All Lesson Attachments tab).

    Ask students to fill in the K section with what they already know about laws and regulations. Then have them fill in the W section with what they want to know. The L section will be filled in during lesson closure.

    Discuss how important it is to follow the rules at the students’ place of employment. Employers also have federal, state, and local rules to follow.

    Display the various posters and lead a discussion about them.

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce lesson objectives, terms, and definitions.

    Distribute graphic organizer Laws and Regulations in the Food Industry Notes (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Students are expected to take notes during the slide presentation.

    Introduce the PowerPoint™ Laws and Regulations in the Food Industry (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Allow time for discussion and questions.

    View video:

    • Know Your Rights
      The U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division (WHD) has developed the “Know Your Rights” video series in English and Spanish to provide workers with useful basic information in different scenarios that workers encounter in the workplace.
      ttp://www.dol.gov/whd/resources/kyrvideo.htm

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • checking for understanding
    • encourage participation

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Distribute graphic organizer Workplace Policies (see All Lesson Attachments tab).

    Divide class into subgroups of four or five.

    Allow students to use computers to research published code of ethics from dining establishments such as:

    • McDonald’s
    • Burger King
    • Applebee’s
    • Chili’s
    • Olive Garden
    • other restaurants

    Students should compare two eating establishments for similarities and differences.

    Each group will then report the findings to the class.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • checking for understanding
    • encourage participation

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Before class begins, print and separate the Laws and Regulations Affecting the Food Industry Flashcards (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and place in a basket.

    Divide class into subgroups of two or three.

    Allow one student from each group to draw a card.

    Students will research the law or regulation using reliable and appropriate websites (.gov, .org, .edu) to include the following:

    • definition
    • timeline
    • provisions
    • enforcement

    Students may present information using a PowerPoint™ or a Prezi™.

    Distribute Rubric for PowerPoint™ or Prezi™ Presentation (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that students understand what is expected.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • assist with technology applications
    • encourage participation

  • Lesson Closure

    Review lesson objectives, terms, and definitions.

    Students will now answer the L section of the KWL – Laws and Regulations in the Food Industry (see All Lesson Attachments tab) about what they have learned about the laws and regulations.

    Continue with discussion of the various code of ethics for dining establishments from the Guided Practice section.

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Students will present their PowerPoint™ or Prezi™ about the laws or regulations they researched.

    Students will be assessed with appropriate rubric.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • assist with presentation
    • praise participation

  • References/Resources

    Images:

    • Microsoft Office Clip Art: Used with permission from Microsoft.

    Textbook:

    Culinary essentials. (2010). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw Hill.
    Draz, J., & Koetke, C. (2010). The culinary professional. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Wilcox Company.
    Reynolds, J. S. (2010). Hospitality services: Food & lodging. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.

    Websites:

  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Recommended Strategies

    Reading Strategies

    The Fair Labor Standards Act covers more than minimum wage, overtime pay, and record keeping. Allow your students to read more in the Handy Reference Guide to the Fair Labor Standards Act.

    Other topics include:

    • nursing mothers
    • enforcement
    • recovery of back wages
    • other labor laws

    United States Department of Labor
    Wage and Hour Division
    http://www.dol.gov/whd/regs/compliance/hrg.htm

    Reading Strategy:
    Encourage students to connect reading to their life experiences or prior knowledge.

  • Quotes

    If you have ten thousand regulations you destroy all respect for the law.
    -Winston Churchill

    Moral values, and a culture and a religion, maintaining these values are far better than laws and regulations.
    -Swami Sivananda

    If you run a corporation, your job is to maximize the return on investment for your investors. Good for you. But by the same token, we have to remember that corporations have no compassion. That’s why legislation and regulations are necessary.
    -Russell Simmons

    The government has the right to change laws and rules and regulations.
    -Jamie Dimon

    We have to have some rules and regulations in America, or the world would empty out here.
    -Gary Ackerman

  • Multimedia/Visual Strategies

    PowerPoint™:

    • Laws and Regulations in the Food Service Industry
    • Presentation Notes – Laws and Regulations in the Food Service Industry

    Technology:

    Files for downloading:

  • Graphic Organizers/Handout

    Graphic Organizer:

    • KWL – Laws and Regulations in the Food Industry
    • Laws and Regulations Affecting the Food Industry Flashcards
    • Workplace Policies

    Handouts

    • EEOC is the Law Poster supplement
    • Family and Medical Leave Act
    • I have Rights Teen Poster
    • Minimum Wage Poster
    • Overtime Pay Requirement
    • Rubric for Laws and Regulations Presentation
    • Youth Minimum Wage – Fair Labor Standards Act
    • Youth Rules! bookmark

    Files for downloading:

  • Writing Strategies

    Journal Entries:

    • If I were paid $10 an hour and I worked 45 hours in one week, my pay would be ……..
    • Tipped employees can earn $2.13 an hour because ….
    • Child labor laws protect young children because …..
    • Employers have responsibilities to their employees because …..
    • Employees have rights on the the job because …..

    Writing Strategy:

    • RAFT Writing Strategy
      • Role – manager
      • Audience – district manager
      • Format – memo
      • Topic – requesting overtime pay for busy holiday week
  • Communication 90 Second Speech Topics

    The Child Labor Laws came into effect because …
    I believe the minimum wage should be raised because ….

  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    Students can create a timeline of the minimum wage throughout the years and make a prediction as to what the minimum wage might be in five years, ten years, and twenty years.

  • Family/Community Connection

    Students can visit with older relatives and ask them how much money they made when they were younger. Students will be interested in finding out that people survived with lower wages.

  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career and Community Leaders of America

    http://www.texasfccla.org

    • STAR Events:
      • Illustrated Talk – An individual or team event – recognizes participants who make an oral presentation about issues concerning Family and Consumer Sciences and/or related occupations. Participants use visuals to illustrate content of the presentation
  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to lesson. For additional information on service learning see http://www.servicelearning.org

    Example:

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