It’s All In the Family

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Human Services

    Course : Interpersonal Studies

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (4) The student analyzes the family’s role in relationship development. The student is expected to:
      • (C) analyze effects of cultural patterns of family relationships
    • (7) The student determines methods that promote an effective family unit. The student is expected to:
      • (A) describe diverse family structures
      • (B) identify the function of individuals within the family
      • (C) compare functions of families in various cultures
      • (D) predict the effects of societal, demographic and economic trends on individuals and the family
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • identify and define the characteristics of a diverse family structure, explain the function of the individuals within the family
    • compare and predict how cultural, societal, demographic and economic trends may affect them
    • create a poster board visual display of their research and share their family structure with peers
  • Rationale

    Script:

    The first relationships you have in life are with your family. Positive family relationships serve as an important function in your life. Modern families are dynamic and fluid, made up of different roles. Families are the basic foundational structure for individual growth and development.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Four 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Adoptive family: Parents and their adopted children

    Blended family: Husband, wife and children from previous marriages

    Childless family: Couples who choose to not have children

    Enculturation: is when one generation passes along what is has learned to the next generation

    Extended family: A family in which relatives, in addition, to parents and children live in a single household.

    Nuclear family: Children raised by both their biological parents

    Nurture: To educate, help or develop

    Single parent: Children raised by one parent

    Tolerance: Sympathy or indulgence for beliefs or practices differing from or conflicting with one’s own

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for PowerPoint™ presentation
    • computers with internet access (be sure to follow district guidelines)

    Materials:

    • construction paper
    • crayons
    • family pictures (see Anticipatory Set)
    • glue
    • markers
    • poster boards
    • printer
    • scissors

    • copies of handout (See All Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Anticipatory Set

    Note to teacher: Free publications and Teaching Tolerance kits are available free to educators at http://www.tolerance.org/teaching-kits

    A few days before this lesson:

    Ask students to bring one to two pictures of their favorite family function, event or holiday to share with the class.

    When class begins, students will line up in order from least to greatest of the number of members of their family household. Students may not talk as they are lining up and will need to find another way to communicate. Students with the same number of family household members may line up next to each other. After students have lined up appropriately, have students at each end share the number of family household members and the make up of the family structure.

    The line will then fold in half so that the person on either end of the line are now standing in front of each other and so on. If there is an odd number of students, a group of three may be at the end. Students will then share with the person across from them the make up of their family structure. Ask the following questions:

    • How many have a nuclear family?
    • How many have a blended family?
    • How many have a single parent family?
    • How many have an extended family?
    • What is your role within the family structure?
    • Is the function of the family different in other cultures? How?

    • Due to the sensitive matter, you may want to avoid asking about adoptive family, legal guardians or foster families.

    Have class share their picture(s) of their favorite family function, event or holiday.

    Post pictures on the wall for the duration of the lesson.

    Teacher may use these partners to form eight groups for the research project.

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce objectives, terms, and definitions.

    Introduce PowerPoint™, It’s All in the Family (see All Lesson Attachments tab). .
    Students will complete the graphic organizer It’s All in the Family Note-taking (see All Lesson Attachments tab) using the information in the PowerPoint™.

    What do statistics indicate about families today? Research United States Census Bureau to determine the composition of today’s households.
    http://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/briefs/c2010br-14.pdf
    Students will take notes using Families Today as teacher shares statistics about families today. Based on these facts, students will predict the effects of societal, demographic, and economic trends on individuals and the family.

    Discuss at least three careers that are represented in the community that are related to working with families. How do people in these careers strengthen the family unit?

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • may work with a peer group to complete graphic organizer
    • allow more time to finish handout

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    In a computer lab:

    In groups of 2-3, students will be assigned one of the eight different modern family structures. Students will need to find information and statistics illustrating their family structure type to include culture, societal issues, demographic facts, economic trends and any other pertinent information. Students will complete Families in a Changing World (see All Lesson Attachments tab) to record their information.

    Students may use graphic organizer It’s All in the Family Note taking for reference. See References/Resources for suggested websites that may be used for research.

    Introduce group project. Groups will be given the Rubric for Family Structure Group Project (see All Lesson Attachments tab) as a guide for their research and poster board. Teacher will review student expectations.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • will work with a peer group
    • may be allowed additional time to complete expected activities

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    In a computer lab:

    Family Structure Group Project: Students will continue working on the family structure from Guided Practice. Students will need to find information and statistics illustrating their family structure type to include culture, societal issues, demographic facts, economic trends and any other pertinent information.

    Students will continue to research of their specific family structure. See References/Resources for suggested websites that may be used for research.

    Once research is completed, groups will begin work on their poster board.

    Students may use the Rubric for Family Structure Group Project (see All Lesson Attachments tab) for reference.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to

    • students will work in peer groups
    • students may have more time to complete assigned project

  • Lesson Closure

    Review objectives, terms, and definitions.

    Students will share their research in the form of an oral presentation, accompanied by their poster board.

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Student projects will be assessed with rubric for each presentation.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to

    • will work with a peer group
    • may be allowed additional time to complete expected assessment

  • References/Resources

    Images:

    • Microsoft Clip Art: Used with permission from Microsoft.

    Textbooks:

    • Sasse, C.R. (2004). Families today. New York: Glencoe/McGraw Hill.

    Websites:

    • Teaching Tolerance
      A place for educators to find thought-provoking news, conversation and support for those who care about diversity, equal opportunity and respect for differences in schools
      http://www.tolerance.org/
  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • ELSP Sentence starter, “I live in a __________ family”. Each student shares their headline with the class.
    • ELPS Sentence starter, “One thing both these families have in common is_____________”
    • word wall
    • provide visuals
    • allow extra processing time
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Recommended Strategies

    Reading Strategies

    Current Events:
    Assign students to read about family structures. Information can be found in newspaper articles, magazines, journals and online print.
    Suggestions:

    Students should each print a source of information about a family structures, pair off and trade documents then use the ”read, write, pair, share” strategy. First reading independently, then writing about what they have read and finally discussing in pairs their insight into the family structures they have read about.

  • Quotes

    The bond that links your family is not one of blood, but of respect and joy in each other’s life. Rarely do members of one family grow up under the same roof.
    -Richard Bach, an American author

    A family is a unit composed not only of children but of men, women, an occasional animal, and the common cold. -Ogden Nash

    As the family goes, so goes the nation and so goes the whole world in which we live.
    -Pope John Paul II

    We must learn to live together as brothers or we will perish together as fools.
    -Martin Luther King, Jr

  • Multimedia/Visual Strategies

    PowerPoint™:

    • It’s All in the Family
    • Presentation Notes for It’s All in the Family

    Technology:

    YouTube™:

    Files for downloading:

  • Graphic Organizers/Handout

    Graphic Organizer:

    • Families in a Changing World
    • It’s All in the Family Note Taking
    • It’s All in the Family Note Taking (Teacher Key)

    Handouts:

    • Families Today
    • Families Today (Teacher Key)
    • Rubric for Family Structure Group Project

    Files for downloading

  • Writing Strategies

    Journal Entries:

    • My idea of a good family relationship is____________________.
    • What qualities build strong family relationships?
    • I feel I have an important role in my family because______________.
    • Families are important to society because___________.

    Writing Strategy:

    • RAFT-stands of Role (of the writer), Audience, Format and Topic.
      Role – Child
      Audience – Parent
      Format – Letter
      Topic – Ways to strengthen the family structure
  • Communication 90 Second Speech Topics

    • Ten cool things about my family are___________.
    • What makes my family special is __________.
    • I like when my family____________________.
    • I wish my family would___________________.
  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    Develop a family story. Family stories are stories that you write about your family members. They can also deal with events that happened to you and your family members. You might not even be in the story, but other family members are. Suppose you write a story about yourself, your mom, dad or entire family. That would be writing a family story. A great example is the Little House on the Prairie series by Laura Ingalls Wilder. Family stories are fun to write because you can pick an event in which you do something exciting with your family members. The story doesn’t necessarily have to include your parents. You might want to write a story about your aunt, uncle, cousins and grandparents. You might even want to write a story about your dog and yourself.

    Create a questionnaire to ask family and friends about their family structures. Present findings to class for extra credit.

    As another enrichment activity, students will develop a graph to show the composition of today’s households including the family structure.

    Interpersonal Studies – Multiple Choice Math Assessment Problems

    • (7) The student determines methods that promote an effective family unit. The student is expected to:
      • (D) predict the effects of societal, demographic, and economic trends on individuals and the family

    Question 8. If Mr. Adams loses his job where he made $3,000.00 a month and must take another job that pays 25% less, how many more hours a month will Mrs. Adams have to work at her job that pays $8.25 an hour in order to make up the difference?
    a. 63 hours a month
    b. 75 hours a month
    c. 91 hours a month
    d. 104 hours a month
    Answer C

    Interpersonal Studies – Writing Prompts

    • (4) The student analyzes the family’s role in relationship development. The student is expected to:
      • (C) analyze effects of cultural patterns of family relationships

    Think about how cultural patterns affect family relationships. Write an essay in which you state your position on the effects of cultural patterns on family relationships.
    (10th and 11th grade persuasive writing)

    TED Talks:

    TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks videos and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event.

    The video below is related to this lesson. Allow students to view the video, and lead a discussion concerning the TED Talk.

    Aicha el-Wafi + Phyllis Rodriguez: The mothers who found forgiveness, friendship
    Phyllis Rodriguez and Aicha el-Wafi have a powerful friendship born of unthinkable loss. Rodriguez’ son was killed in the World Trade Center attacks on September 11, 2001; el-Wafi’s son Zacarias Moussaoui was convicted of a role in those attacks and is serving a life sentence. In hoping to find peace, these two moms have come to understand and respect one another.
    http://www.ted.com/talks/9_11_healing_the_mothers_who_found_forgiveness_friendship?language=en

  • Family/Community Connection

    Students will create a family bumper sticker. Their bumper sticker must include a family motto related to their own personal family. They will obtain feedback from their parents, siblings and other family members to determine the family motto. Bumper stickers can be displayed with the student tri-fold display project boards.

  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) http://www.texasfccla.org

    FCCLA Family First Project
    http://www.fcclainc.org/content/families-first/

    The FCCLA Families First national peer education program through which youth gain a better understanding of how families work and learn skills to become strong family members. Its goals are to: help youth become strong family members and leaders for today and tomorrow and strengthen the family as the basic unit of society. To help members focus their projects, Families First offers five units. Members may complete projects in one or several units. There is no particular order to them; although, “Families Today” might be a good place to start. It covers topics that provide a general overview of families and related issues:
    Families Today: Understand and celebrate families
    You-Me-Us: Strengthen family relationships
    Meet the Challenge: Overcome obstacles together
    Balancing Family and Career: Manage multiple responsibilities
    Parent Practice: Learn to nurture children.

  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to lesson. For additional information on service learning see http://www.nylc.org/

    Possible ideas:

    Lead students to plan a cultural family fun day.
    Volunteer at a family health fair.

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