Inside the Package: Understanding the Nutrition Facts Label

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Human Services

    Course : Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (1) The student understands the role of nutrients in the body. The student is expected to:
      • (A) classify nutrients, their functions, and food sources and compare the nutritive value of various foods
    • (3) The student demonstrates knowledge of nutritionally balanced diets. The student is expected to:
      • (I) examine the nutritional value of fast foods and convenience foods
      • (J) read and interpret food label
      • (K) examine and explain nutritional serving sizes
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • identify information on food labels
    • interpret nutrition information found on food labels
    • investigate foods high in nutrients
    • research nutrition information for a favorite fast food item
    • compare fast food items to healthier food versions
  • Rationale

    Understanding the Nutrition Facts Label has become an important link in maintaining our healthy lifestyles. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates the information on food labels to make sure consumers have complete, useful, and accurate information about the foods they buy and eat.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Seven 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Calcium: A mineral needed by the body for, among other things, to maintain bone health

    Calories: The amount of energy needed to raise the temperature of 1 kilogram of water (a little more than 4 cups) by 1 degree Celsius

    Dietary Fiber: Plant material that cannot be digested

    Fast food: Hamburgers, pizza, or fried chicken, that is prepared in quantity by a standardized method and can be dispensed quickly at inexpensive restaurants for eating there or elsewhere

    Nutrition Facts Label: The part of the food label that gives the serving size, servings per container, calories per serving and information on some nutrients

    Percent Daily Values: The percentage of the daily values found in a specific serving of a food and based on the Daily Value recommendations for key nutrients for a 2000 calorie diet

    Saturated Fat: A type of fat that may increase your low-density lipoprotein (LDL) bad cholesterol levels. Elevated LDL levels may increase your risk of heart disease

    Serving Size: A standardized amount of a food, such as a cup or an ounce, used in comparing similar foods

    Servings per container: The total number of servings in a food package based on the serving size

    Sodium: A component of salt (sodium chloride); excess sodium intake can increase your risk for high blood pressure. A potassium rich diet can counteract some of sodium’s effects on blood pressure

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with Internet access for multimedia presentations
    • light projector (Elmo)

    Materials:

    • empty food packages (see Anticipatory Set)

    • copies for handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Anticipatory Set

    Before class begins:

    Gather empty containers of various foods that have the Nutrition Facts Label and display them in front of the room. Items may include:

    • candy wrappers
    • cereal boxes
    • chip bags
    • energy drinks
    • fast food packages
    • soda can/bottles

    When class begins, choose any package and ask the following questions:

    1. How many servings do you think are in the package?
    2. How many calories per serving?
    3. Could you eat the whole package?
    4. Is there any nutritional value in this food?
    5. Why do we eat/drink this type of food?
    6. Have you read the Nutrition Facts Label on the foods you eat?

    Display the package on the light projector for your students to view.

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Distribute graphic organizer Nutrition Facts to Eat Healthier (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that students may take notes during the slide presentation and add appropriate food examples for each section.

    Introduce PowerPoint™ Inside the Package: Understanding the Nutrition Facts Label (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Follow the script at the bottom of the presentation notes.

    View Food and Drug Administration video:

    This video can be viewed all at once or shown by segments (recommended).

    Distribute handout Eat Right: Shop Smart – Get the Facts on Food Labels (see All Lesson Attachments tab) from the Food, Nutrition and Health Tips from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Allow for discussion. Students will be able to share this information with their parents.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • checking for understanding
    • peer tutor

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Distribute handout Inside the Package (see All Lesson Attachments tab).
    Assign the students to find a nutrition facts label from any food/snack/beverage they have consumed. Students should transfer the information to the handout in the correct sections and attach the empty package for verification.
    Display a sample on the light projector so that students can follow along.
    Discuss questions on handout. Explain that sometimes we eat without realizing how much we have eaten. Some people tend to eat more when they are alone, stressed, in a hurry, or very hungry.
    __

    Scavenger Hunt Ideas

    If ChooseMyPlate is studied in sections (one section at a time), then assign the Inside the Package (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout for each section with the following percentages:

    1. Any label
    2. Fruit Group – Vitamin C 15%+
    3. Vegetable Group – Vitamin A 10%+
    4. Grains Group – Dietary Fiber 4%+
    5. Dairy Group – Calcium 20%+
    6. Protein Foods Group – Iron 2%+
    7. Sodium 10%+

    Students will have to look for foods they have eaten that contain the amounts listed. The percentages are low making it easy for the students to accomplish the assignment. They may even use packages available from their school breakfast or lunch. It will be interesting to see what they eat. Challenge the students to look for higher percentages in each section for extra credit.

    If time allows, students may visit FDA’s interactive website for more information on the Nutrition Facts Label.

    • Make Your Calories Count
      Use the Nutrition Facts Label for Healthy Weight Management
      Make Your Calories Count is an interactive learning program that provides consumers with information to help plan a healthful diet while managing calorie intake. The exercises will help consumers use the food label to make decisions about which food choice is right for them. For simplicity, the program presents two nutrients that should be limited (saturated fat and sodium) and two nutrients that should be consumed in adequate amounts (fiber and calcium).
      http://www.fda.gov/Food/IngredientsPackagingLabeling/LabelingNutrition/ucm275438.htm

    Note to teacher: The Nutrition Facts Label was made according to FDA guidelines with the following link:

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • repeated instructions
    • shortened, simplified instructions

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Students will work individually and design a poster comparing and evaluating the nutritional value of two fast food items/meals from their favorite establishments or convenience stores. Examples may include hamburger, fries, soft drink (icee), chicken nuggets, and other choices.

    Students will research the nutritional facts for the particular items using the Internet or available brochures from local fast food establishments and evaluate and determine the healthier choice.

    Empty packages or illustrations of food items may be attached to the poster. Student findings will be presented to the class. Students may also be encouraged to provide healthier alternatives to the fast food items/meals.

    If you have a computer lab available, students can create a Glogster™ (virtual poster) using http://www.edu.glogster.com. If an appropriate video is available, they should include it.

    Distribute Rubric for Fast Food Nutrition Information Visual Display (see All Lesson Attachments tab) for a poster board display or the Rubric for Fast Food Nutrition Information Glogster™EDU Display (see All Lesson Attachments tab) for the virtual poster. Review the tasks so that students will understand the assignment.

    Note to Teacher: Family, Career, and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) offers an online Students Taking Action with Recognition (STAR) competition event using the virtual poster – Glogster™EDU. This lesson will allow students to practice their skills before the competition. For more details, see the Career and Technical Student Organization (CTSO) connection in this lesson.
    http://www.fcclainc.org/content/star-event-descriptions/

    Allow the students to vote for the best poster that meets all the criteria from the rubrics and award the Certificate of Excellence to the Best Nutrition Facts Poster/Glogster™ (see All Lesson Attachments tab). This certificate can be added to a portfolio. Other certificate templates can be found on Microsoft Word™ and designed with your school logo and mascot if desired.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • extended time for assignments
    • check for understanding

  • Lesson Closure

    Review lesson objectives, terms, and definitions.

    Using the light projector if available, view some of the food packages students have turned in and discuss the serving size, calories, fat, and more.

    To find reasons for mindless eating, ask students the following questions:

    • Did they eat the entire product?
    • What were they doing when they ate the product?
    • Who were they with?
    • Were they really hungry?

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Students will present their fast food nutrition information on a poster (virtual or poster board).
    All presentations will be assessed with a rubric.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • encourage participation
    • assist in presentation

  • References/Resources

    Images:

    • Microsoft Office Clip Art: Used with permission from Microsoft.

    Textbook:

    • Kowtaluk, H. (2010). Food for today. Columbus, OH: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.

    Websites:

    • Make Your Calories Count
      Use the Nutrition Facts Label for Healthy Weight Management
      Make Your Calories Count is an interactive learning program that provides consumers with information to help plan a healthful diet while managing calorie intake. The exercises will help consumers use the food label to make decisions about which food choice is right for them. For simplicity, the program presents two nutrients that should be limited (saturated fat and sodium) and two nutrients that should be consumed in adequate amounts (fiber and calcium).
      http://www.fda.gov/Food/ResourcesForYou/Consumers/NFLPM/ucm275438.htm
  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Recommended Strategies

    Reading Strategies

    Current Events:
    Assign students to read information to keep up with the latest news on nutrition. Information can be found in newspaper articles, magazines, journals, and online print.
    Suggestions:

    Encourage students to read the following Blogs from the Mayo Clinic, USDA, and the U.S. Food Policy.

    Have students form their own questions about the text prior to reading or have them write down any questions that come to mind as they are reading.

  • Quotes

    In fresh fruit and vegetables and nuts are all the vitamins and minerals and high grade proteins the human body needs to bring it to a state of physical perfection and to MAINTAIN it in that state indefinitely.
    -Dr. Herbert Shelton, M.D. Superior Nutrition

    Most human illnesses and diseases are due to a deficiency of vital nutrients. When you supply your body with the proper nutrients, in a form that your body can use, it knows how to repair itself.
    -American Living Foods

    The first wealth is health.
    -Emerson

    The human body heals itself and nutrition provides the resources to accomplish the task.
    -Roger Williams Ph.D. (1971)

    I do practice what I preach when it comes to nutrition.
    -Mehmet Oz

    Nutrition is also a valuable component that can help athletes both protect themselves and improve performance.
    -Bill Toomey

    I believe that parents need to make nutrition education a priority in their home environment. It’s crucial for good health and longevity to instill in your children sound eating habits from an early age.
    -Cat Cora

  • Multimedia/Visual Strategies

    PowerPoint™:

    • Inside the Package: Understanding the Nutrition Facts Label
    • Presentation Notes – Inside the Package: Understanding the Nutrition Facts Label

    Files for downloading:

  • Graphic Organizers/Handout

    Graphic Organizer:

    • Nutrition Facts to Eat Healthier
    • Nutrition Facts to Eat Healthier (Key)

    Handouts:

    • Eat Right: Shop Smart – Get the Facts on Food Labels
    • Certificate of Excellence
    • Rubric for Fast Food Nutrition Information Glogster™EDU Display
    • Rubric for Fast Food Nutrition Information Visual Display
    • Inside the Package

    Files for downloading:

  • Writing Strategies

    Journal Entries:

    • Reading the Nutrition Facts Label is important because …………
    • A fact from the Nutrition Facts Label from my favorite food is …….
    • My favorite drink has _____ calories and I am going to ………..
    • It is important to read the Nutrition Facts Label because …..
    • I think more information such as _____________ should be included in the Nutrition Facts Label because ……
    • Compare a fast food meal and a healthy meal with the Nutrition Facts Label. State the results.
    • I was surprised to learn that the Nutrition Facts Label from my favorite food was …..

    Writing Strategy:

    RAFT writing strategy

    • Role – student
    • Audience – school peers
    • Format – PSA
    • Topic – important information about the Nutrition Facts Label

  • Communication 90 Second Speech Topics

    • My favorite fast food meal is ………
    • The reason I eat fast food is …….
    • I eat fast food _______ day(s) of the week…..
  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    Students can design a brochure stating the importance of reading the Nutrition Facts Label. They can request permission to place the brochure in the nurse’s office.

    Math Assessment Question

    • (3) The student demonstrates knowledge of nutritionally balanced diets. The student is expected to:
      • (J) read and interpret food labels;
      • (K) examine and explain nutritional serving sizes.

    Question 5. Barbara eats an entire bag of chips. Afterwards, she wants to know how many calories she consumed. On the label, the serving size of 12 chips has 130 calories. There are 12 servings per bag. How many calories did she consume?

    • a. 144 calories
    • b. 976 calories
    • c. 1,560 calories
    • d. 2,014 calories

    Answer: c

    Question 9. If a study shows that an average fast food meal takes 2 hours off your life
    expectancy, and you eat fast food once a day for four weeks, how many days can you
    expect to lose from your life expectancy?
    a. 2 1/3
    b. 28
    c. 38 1/3
    d. 56

    Answer: a

  • Family/Community Connection

    Invite a registered dietitian to speak to the class about reading the nutrition facts label and the dangers of too much fast food.

    Encourage your family to read the nutrition facts from the foods they eat.

  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)

    http://www.texasfccla.org

    STAR Events:

    • Sports Nutrition
      An individual or team event, recognizes participants who use Family and Consumer Sciences skills to plan and develop an individualized nutritional plan to meet the needs of a competitive student athletic in a specific sport.
    • Nutrition and Wellness
      An individual event, recognizes participants who track food intake and physical activity for themselves, their family, or a community group and determine goals and strategies for improving their overall health.

    Online STAR Events:

    • No Kid Hungry National Outreach Project
      A team event, recognizes chapters that participate in the “No Kid Hungry” Share our Strength National Outreach Project. Participants will use Family and Consumer Sciences content and skills to address ending childhood hunger through service learning, education/awareness, and fundraising.
    • Virtual Poster
      An individual event, recognizes participants who demonstrate their knowledge, skills, and ability to publish a virtual, interactive digital poster using Glogster EDU (edu.glogster.com). The virtual poster (Glogster) will address an issue related to one of the three Student Body units: Eat Right, Be Fit, and Make Healthy Choices.
  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to the lesson. For additional information on service learning see http://www.servicelearning.org

    Example:

    Students can make arrangements to teach the important facts from the nutrition label to an after school program. They can display their Glogster™ Poster or poster boards about the nutrition information gathered from fast food establishments.

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