I Got the Job! Now What?

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Hospitality and Tourism

    Course : Practicum in Culinary Arts

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (2) The student develops skills for success in the workplace. The student is expected to:
      • (I) evaluate the relationship of good physical and mental health to job success and personal achievement
      • (J) demonstrate effective verbal, non-verbal, written and electronic communication skills
    • (7) The student uses concepts and skills related to safety in the workplace. The student is expected:
      • (D) analyze health and wellness practices that influence job performance
    • (8) The student evaluates personal attitudes and work habits that support career retention and advancement. The student is expected to:
      • (D) evaluate strategies for career retention and advancement in response to the changing global workplace
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • identify how to be successful in their careers
    • analyze strategies for succeeding at work
    • describe their symptoms of stress and how to manage it
    • evaluate their physical and mental health
  • Rationale

    Script:

    You got a job! Now what do you do? Working in the food industry can be rewarding but it can also be stressful. Learning the duties of a new job, handling stressful situations and determining the management chain-of-command are important skills to learn in this industry. In this lesson you will learn what it takes to turn a job into a career!

  • Duration of Lesson

    Three 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Advancement: The act of being raised to a higher rank or position

    Global: Involving the entire world

    Health: The state of being sound in body and mind

    Mental health: A state of well-being in which the individual realizes his or her own abilities, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully and is able to make a contribution to his or her community

    Physical: Relating to the body of a person

    Retention: The ability to keep something

    Stress: A state of mental tension and worry caused by problems in your life, work or other situations

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for PowerPoint™ presentation
    • computers with Internet access (be sure to follow school district guidelines)
    • headphones

    Supplies:

    • applications for:
      • ACT/SAT test
      • college
      • financial aid
      • scholarships
    • cash register (if available; for time card purposes)
    • textbooks
    • time cards (if available)
    • time clock (if available)
    • work schedules

    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)

  • Anticipatory Set

    Before class begins:

    Note: This lesson should follow the careers lesson:


    Become familiar with The Texas Work Prep Learning Management System (LMS) designed and hosted by the Texas Workforce Commission.

    • Succeed at Work This course will help students enjoy their job and discusses career success. The course is approximately an hour and a half long. Students will receive a certificate upon successful completion of this course. Certificate can be printed and added to their professional portfolio.
      https://www.texasworkprep.com/texasworkprep.htm


    Display as many items from the Materials or Specialized Equipment Needed tab as you have available on a table in front of the room so that students may view as they enter.

    These items will allow the students to visualize all of the things they have to balance before they graduate from school. These items can cause stress and anxiety and learning how to handle stress will help them be successful in their chosen careers.

    A Chalk Talk will be used in this section. Preview the Job Retention Chalk Talk Example (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that you will understand what to do with the students.

    Write the following statement in large letters on a white/chalk board for students to see as they enter the classroom:

    You got the job! Now how do you keep it?

    Note: If a white board is not available, print the statement on a white sheet of paper and place on a light projector to view on a screen. Students may write their answers to be displayed on this paper.

    Students, either one by one or a few at a time, walk up to the board and add their comments, ideas or suggestions. The activity can be timed, and can also be done in silence.

    Begin a discussion with the students about the different skills that are needed to keep a job.

    If possible, save the Chalk Talk on the board as it will be discussed in the Lesson Closure section. If the board is needed, take a picture with a camera, smart phone or tablet so that it can be shown on a projector.

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Distribute a handout or graphic organizer from the Instructional Strategies drop down menu in Classroom Essentials or ask students to take notes in their journal books or on their own paper.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/Spider-Map.pdf
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/Note-Taking.pdf

    Introduce the PowerPoint™ I Got the Job! Now What? (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Students will be expected to take notes while viewing the slide presentation. Allow time for classroom discussion.

    View video from the National Restaurant Association:

    • America’s Restaurants – Industry of Opportunity
      As the second largest private-sector employer in the country, America’s restaurants are an economic force, but that statistic doesn’t fully tell the story of the millions of individuals who are living the American Dream by working in our industry. This video captures a few poignant stories that help tell the ‘Industry of Opportunity’ story.
      http://www.americaworkshere.org/video/americas-restaurants-industry-of-opportunity

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • providing a printed copy of slide presentation
    • check for understanding

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Distribute the graphic organizer Your Stress Symptoms and Management (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and instruct the students to list the symptoms of how they feel when they are stressed on one side the handout.

    Students should also list the healthy ways they manage stress in the next column.

    Instruct students to log onto the Texas Workforce website so that may be able to complete the second module in the series.

    Emphasize the need to read and follow slowly the important strategies the interactive course features.

    • Succeed at Work This course will help students enjoy their job and discusses career success. The course is approximately an hour and a half long. Students will receive a certificate upon successful completion of this course. Certificate can be printed and added to their professional portfolio.
      https://www.texasworkprep.com/texasworkprep.htm

    Sections include:

    1. Succeed at Work Stages
    2. Acting Self-Employed
    3. Starting a New Job
    4. Being an Excellent Employee (Work Ethics)
    5. Living a Balanced Life
    6. Enjoying Your Current Position

    After completing the course, students will be able to successfully pass a short quiz to receive their printable certificate.

    Stress the importance of having this type of documentation in their professional portfolio.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • using the closed-caption option
    • peer tutor

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Read the following script:

    Working in the food service industry is physically and mentally demanding. Being able to handle this type of career can be rewarding. How can we find out if we are ready?

    Distribute the handout Physical and Mental Health Assessment (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and instruct students to read each statement carefully in the seven areas of wellness.

    Students should add up their scores in each area and compare them to the ideal score.

    Remind students to answer the following questions:

    • Which dimension of wellness needs improvement?
    • How can you improve this wellness dimension?

    Students may share their answers with the rest of the class.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • peer to read handout
    • extra time for oral response

  • Lesson Closure

    Review terms, definitions and objectives.

    Review the Job Retention Chalk Talk created in the Anticipatory Section.

    Now that students have discussed how to keep a job, discuss advancement or promotions for their jobs.

    Ask students the following questions:

    • What skills do you need to be promoted?
    • Are you a leader?
    • Is being a manager an option for you?
    • Do you think you can handle the added responsibilities?

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Students will be assessed through the interactive Texas Workforce program and the Physical and Mental Health Assessment.

    Students may write a one page reflection on the strategies they have learned to advance and retain employment and how to deal with physical and mental health issues.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • praise participation
    • note-taking assistance

  • References/Resources

    Textbook:

    • Culinary essentials. (2010). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
    • Draz, J., & Koetke, C. (2014). The culinary professional. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.

    Video:

    • America’s Restaurants – Industry of Opportunity
      As the second largest private-sector employer in the country, America’s restaurants are an economic force, but that statistic doesn’t fully tell the story of the millions of individuals who are living the American Dream by working in our industry. This video captures a few poignant stories that help tell the ‘Industry of Opportunity’ story.
      http://www.americaworkshere.org/video/americas-restaurants-industry-of-opportunity

    Websites:

  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • word wall
    • draw visual representations of terms on word wall
    • add terms and definitions to personal dictionary
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Recommended Strategies

    Reading Strategies

    Other articles pertaining to this lesson that students may read include:

    • Duties & Skill of Food Service Management
      Food service managers, including assistant and general managers, are usually responsible for increasing sales and profits in their units by focusing on hospitality, food quality, service and cleanliness. Most food service management employees work long hours, which can include evenings and weekends.
      http://www.ehow.com/list_6637663_duties-skill-food-service-management.html
    • Job Retention Strategies
      The top 10 reasons that people lose their jobs are personality conflicts, poor performance, absenteeism, insubordination, tardiness, behavior or attitude, theft, harassment, discrimination and layoffs, according to the “Top Ten Reasons for Termination” by Ann Vessels. The following job retention strategies will help you keep your job without stressing out.
      http://www.ehow.com/way_5796963_job-retention-strategies.html
    • The Health Triangle: Mental, Social, & Physical Definitions
      Created in 1997 as a project for an Alaska Middle School, the Health Triangle has served as a graph that measures an individual’s physical, mental and social health. The creators used an equilateral triangle to represent these aspects of health. Because all sides of this types of triangle are equal, it stresses the equal importance of each of these aspects. In fact, devoting more attention to one particular side, while neglecting the others, can lead to health imbalances.
      http://www.ehow.com/about_5047508_health-mental-social-physical-definitons.html

    Reading Strategy
    Encourage students to “visualize” as they read. Many students are visual learners and will benefit from making sketches or diagrams on scrap paper as they read. Providing students with graphic organizers to help them organize their thoughts is also helpful.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/rgroup/instructional-strategies/page/4/

  • Quotes

    To keep the body in good health is a duty… otherwise we shall not be able to keep our mind strong and clear.
    -Buddha

    Early to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise.
    -Benjamin Franklin

    What is the recipe for successful achievement? To my mind there are just four essential ingredients: Choose a career you love, give it the best there is in you, seize your opportunities, and be a member of the team.
    -Benjamin Franklin Fairless

    It’s like Forrest Gump said, ‘Life is like a box of chocolates.’ Your career is like a box of chocolates – you never know what you’re going to get. But everything you get is going to teach you something along the way and make you the person you are today. That’s the exciting part – it’s an adventure in itself.
    -Nick Carter

  • Multimedia/Visual Strategies

    PowerPoint™:

    • Career Success in the Food Industry
    • Presentation Notes – Career Success in the Food Industry

    Technology:

    • TED Talks:
      • Kelly McGonigal: How to make stress your friend
        Stress. It makes your heart pound, your breathing quicken and your forehead sweat. But while stress has been made into a public health enemy, new research suggests that stress may only be bad for you if you believe that to be the case. Psychologist Kelly McGonigal urges us to see stress as a positive, and introduces us to an unsung mechanism for stress reduction: reaching out to others.
        http://www.ted.com/talks/kelly_mcgonigal_how_to_make_stress_your_friend?language=en
  • Graphic Organizers/Handout

    Handouts:

    • Physical and Mental Health Assessment

    Graphic Organizers:

    • Your Stress Symptoms and Management

    Teacher Resource:

    • Job Retention Chalk Talk Example

    Files for downloading:

  • Writing Strategies

    Journal Entries:

    • When I feel stressed, I …
    • As part of my physical health, I (dance, run, walk. yoga) …
    • I enjoy my job! In order to keep my job, I …

    Writing Strategy:

    • RAFT Writing Strategy:
      • Role – cook
      • Audience – restaurant manager
      • Topic – promotion
      • Format – letter

    Write a letter to the restaurant manager letting him/her know that you are interested in being promoted to chef. List your qualifications.

  • Communication 90 Second Speech Topics

    • Three things that I do when I feel stressed are …
    • Employability skills needed to retain a job are …
  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    Students may research various activities to relieve stress (especially during final exams) and create a bulletin board to display in the counselor’s office.

    Infographic:

    Infographics are graphic visual representations of information, data or knowledge intended to present complex information quickly and clearly.

    The infographic below is related to this lesson. Allow students to view the image on a projector and lead a discussion concerning the information provided.

    TED Talks:

    TED is a nonprofit organization devoted to spreading ideas, usually in the form of short, powerful talks (18 minutes or less).

    The video below is related to this lesson. Allow students to view the video and lead a discussion concerning the TED Talk.

    • Kelly McGonigal: How to make stress your friend
      Stress. It makes your heart pound, your breathing quicken and your forehead sweat. But while stress has been made into a public health enemy, new research suggests that stress may only be bad for you if you believe that to be the case. Psychologist Kelly McGonigal urges us to see stress as a positive, and introduces us to an unsung mechanism for stress reduction: reaching out to others.
      http://www.ted.com/talks/kelly_mcgonigal_how_to_make_stress_your_friend?language=en
  • Family/Community Connection

    Encourage students to share some stress relievers tips with family to be able to better cope with the work/life balance.

  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career and Community Leaders of America

    http://www.fcclainc.org

    • Leadership
      An individual event, recognizes participants who actively evaluate and grow in their leadership potential. Participants use the Student Leadership Challenge and supporting materials, to investigate their leadership ability and develop a mentorship relationship to further their leadership development.
    • Hospitality, Tourism and Recreation
      An individual or team event, recognizes participants who demonstrate their knowledge of the hospitality, tourism, and recreation industries and ability to translate their knowledge into a hypothetical or real business. Project must relate to culinary, lodging, recreation, tourism, or event coordination.
    • Nutrition and Wellness Event
      An individual event, recognizes participants who track food intake and physical activity for themselves, their family, or a community group and determine goals and strategies for improving their overall health.

    SkillsUSA

    http://skillsusa.org/

    • Culinary Arts
      The competition will encompass both hot and cold food preparation and presentation. Contestants will demonstrate their knowledge and skills through the production of a four-course menu in a full day competition. The contestants will be rated on their organization, knife skills, cooking techniques, creative presentation, sanitation food safety techniques, and above all, the quality and flavor of their prepared items. The high school competitors will work from one menu with standardized recipes. The college/postsecondary students will work from a market basket format and write their own menu and recipes the night before the competition.
    • Restaurant Service
      Contestants are tested on skills required in the “front of the house” of a fine restaurant. The focus is on guest service and guest relations in the dining room including: table set up; greeting guests; reservations procedures; presentation of menus; description of food, drinks, soups and specials of the day; taking orders; serving each course and clearing the table after each course; and preparation and presentation of the check and closing remarks. Contestants are judged on personal appearance, tableside manner, professionalism, ease with guests, courtesy, general knowledge and technical and verbal skills.
  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to this lesson.
    www.ysa.org

    Possible ideas:

    Students may do a survey of the graduating seniors to see how they deal with stress during college applications, ACT and SAT tests, financial aid applications and high school activities. They may research stress relieving techniques and create a brochure to be passed out in the counselor’s office.

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