How to Teach Texas Style

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Education and Training

    Course : Instructional Practices in Education and Training

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (1) The student explores the teaching and training profession. The student is expected to:
      • (B) determine knowledge and skills needed by teaching and training professionals
    • (3) The student communicates effectively. The student is expected to:
      • (A) demonstrate effective verbal, non-verbal, written and electronic communication skills
      • (C) demonstrate effective communication skills in teaching and training
    • (4) The student plans and develops effective instruction. The student is expected to:
      • (A) explain the role of the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) in planning and evaluating instruction
      • (B) explain the rationale for having a fundamental knowledge of the subject matter in order to plan and prepare effective instruction
      • (C) explain the rationale and process of instructional planning
      • (E) create clear short- and long-term learning objectives that are developmentally appropriate for students
      • (F) demonstrate teacher planning to meet instructional goals
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • analyze TEKS and explain the value and reasoning behind them
    • explain reasoning for having a set of guidelines for a course in the state of Texas and how it relates to instruction
    • explore the term “instructional objective” and practice constructing objectives that reflect content-specific TEKS
    • observe and analyze various teachers’ lessons for TEKS and objectives addressed
  • Rationale

    Script:

    How do Texas teachers determine what to teach? What guidelines or parameters do they use? As future Texas educators, you will work with the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) every single day. You need to know the role of the TEKS in planning and evaluating instruction and how to write clear short- and long-term instructional objectives that are developmentally appropriate for students.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Three 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Cooperative learning: Activities in which students are grouped together and collaborate to complete tasks or projects

    Curriculum: Content; a course of studies

    Direct Instruction: Highly structured lesson in which most of the information is being given from the teacher to the student

    Engagement: When students are actively involved

    Guided Practice: Students practice a new skill with teacher nearby to provide immediate feedback

    Independent Practice: Activity in which students practice a new skill or utilize new knowledge on their own

    Lesson plans: Detailed outlines of what will be taught, how it will be taught, why it is being taught and how learning will be evaluated

    LOTE: Languages Other Than English

    Modeling: Instructor physically shows the student/class how something works

    Objectives: What instructors want the students to accomplish; the “point” of the lesson

    Problem based learning: Student-centered strategy in which students identify a problem and work collaboratively to solve it

    TEKS (Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills): K-12 curriculum for the state of Texas which details the curriculum requirements for every course

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer lab with Internet access (be sure to follow district guidelines for Internet access)
    • computer with projector for multimedia presentation
    • presenter/remote

    Materials:

    • copies of Instructional Practices in Education and Training TEKS
    • index cards
    • lesson plan binder
    • textbooks and resources for Instructional Practices in Education and Training

    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Anticipatory Set

    Prior to the lesson:

    Become familiar with PowerPoint™, handouts and activities.

    Before class begins, familiarize yourself with the TEKS for this course, CTE TEKS Instructional Practices in Education and Training (see All Lesson Attachments tab).

    Using How to Teach Texas Style TEKS/Learning Objectives Matching Activity, make five copies of the activity for a total of five sets. Cut the boxes apart and place all the strips from each set into an envelope. This activity will be used during Guided Practice.

    Before class begins:

    As students walk into the classroom, distribute a copy of CTE TEKS Instructional Practices in Education and Training (see All Lesson Attachments tab) to each. Instruct students to read the contents.

    Allow the students about ten minutes to read over the TEKS. Then ask the following questions and discuss:

    • How do you think teachers determine what they are going to teach?
    • Why can’t teachers teach only what they think is most important? What would happen if all teachers did this?
    • How do TEKS help teachers plan and organize lessons for the school year?
    • What would happen if teachers did not have a set of plans for the school year telling instructors what to teach to students?
    • What are instructional objectives?
    • How do the TEKS relate to instructional objectives?

    Inform students that the state mandates what Texas teachers are to teach by way of the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS). Teachers can certainly personalize and enhance the lessons, but they cannot pick and choose the TEKS they like. All the TEKS for each course must be taught.

    Instruct students to keep the copy of their course TEKS in their notebooks for the remainder of the year.

    Distribute KWL Chart – TEKS/Instructional Objectives (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Have students fill out the first two columns of the chart.

    • What do they already KNOW about the TEKS/Instructional Objectives?
    • What do they want to LEARN about TEKS/Instructional Objectives?

    The last column will be completed during Lesson Closure.

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Note to teacher: Prior to beginning this lesson, please review, preview and select the appropriate multimedia for your classes.

    Introduce lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Provide students with Teaching Texas Style Note-taking (see All Lesson Attachments tab), or have them take notes in their journals.

    Introduce the PowerPoint™ How to Teach Texas Style (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Students will be expected to take notes while viewing the slide presentation. Allow time for classroom discussion.

    Throughout the lesson, refer to the Word Wall so that students may become familiar with terminology. You may use a site such as wordle.net or tagxedo.com to create a digital word wall.

    On slides 4-7, show students where to locate the list of TEKS. If students have access to computers, guide them as they access the TEA website and the TEKS. Have students add the website URL and instructions for locating the TEKS to their notes. See Presentation Notes for How to Teach Texas Style (see all Lesson Attachments tab) for additional information.

    Students must be able to access (paper copy or bookmarked page) TEKS for the grade level or subject area in which they will be interning for future reference. If students do not have a grade assignment, ask them to select a grade level or subject of interest. Allow ample time for students to complete this task.

    Ask the following question:

    • How would you feel if you were instructed to develop a lesson using an approved curriculum? What if the lesson had to include selected TEKS and instructional objectives and had to ensure all students were engaged from bell to bell?

    Explain the term curriculum and allow time for a discussion.

    Continue with the PowerPoint™ presentation and allow time for students to take notes and add new vocabulary on the note-taking handout. Include the following talking points:

    • Explain the differences between course TEKS and lesson objectives.
    • Provide a course TEK (Child Development) and its corresponding objective.
    • Have the students identify and then discuss the differences that they see in these.
    • Show an example of TEKS from a subject such as Child Development, and as a class, discuss how this can be turned into an instructional objective. Do this together on the board.
    • This activity should allow students to begin to understand the difference and be able to convert TEKS to instructional objectives. Use this example to begin a discussion on the importance of being knowledgeable in your subject area.

    Select a student scribe to write answers on the board for the next activity.

    Divide the board into two sections: Lessons and Teaching Activities.

    Ask students to think of a favorite lesson that they have participated in. This will be listed under Lessons. After several examples have been provided, allow students to determine what teaching activities made the lessons interesting and fun. This list goes under Teaching Activities. Discuss students’ answers.

    • Why are some activities liked more than others?
    • Why doesn’t everyone like the same thing?
    • How do the TEKS tie into the lessons listed?
    • How do instructional objectives tie into the lessons listed?

    Using Teaching Texas Style Note-taking (see All Lesson Attachments tab), students will have an opportunity to reflect upon, review and respond to the information pertaining to the PowerPoint™. They will write a summary of questions, topics or statements which reflect the information from the lesson:

    • Discuss the topic
    • Write down your thoughts
    • Make a real-world connection to the lesson
    • How is this going to help you in the future?

    Allow for questions and answers to check for understanding.

    Videos included in the PowerPoint™ presentation:

    • New Teacher Academy: Lesson Planning
      Lesson plans are the cornerstone of a teacher’s day. Learn about the key elements of any lesson plan, and watch as a new teacher creates a lesson plan step-by-step with her coach.
      http://youtu.be/lQynxXbzHvw
    • Writing Competency-based Learning Objectives
      Mark Winegar explains how to make learning objectives based on the state competencies (TEKS) for a specific course.
      http://youtu.be/zm0TEsstc_E

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • allowing students to be paired with another student when locating TEKS online
    • checking for understanding
    • providing assistance with note-taking, navigating the web and completing the assessment
    • providing extra time for oral response
    • providing frequent feedback

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Scenario: You are a mentor teacher to new teachers. Your job is to teach the new teachers how to write instructional objectives.

    Instruct students that, with a partner, they will locate five TEKS for a specific grade level and subject area that interest them. You may opt to assign students a specific grade level and subject area. Distribute How to Teach Texas Style Scenario (see All Lesson Attachments tab). The students will complete just the first column during the Guided Practice activity; the rest will be completed during Independent Practice. Review with students the steps for locating the appropriate TEKS on the TEA website. Allow for peer assistance. Instructions for how to locate TEKS for a specific grade level and subject area can be found using the handout Locating TEKS (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Students can race to find the information if this fits your class environment.

    Students will practice matching TEKS and instructional objectives by using How to Teach Texas Style TEKS/Instructional Objectives Matching Activity (see All Lesson Attachments tab).

    Separate students into small groups. Each group will receive an envelope with strips of paper containing TEKS and instructional objectives. They will work together to match the objective to the corresponding TEKS. Some of the TEKS will have two objectives. Have students discuss within their groups the reasons for making the pairs that they do. Use How to Teach Texas Style TEKS/Instructional Objectives Matching Activity (Key) (see All Lesson Attachments tab) to check students’ answers.

    The students will compare and contrast the TEKS and objectives using the Compare and Contrast TEKS/Instructional Objectives handout (see All Lesson Attachments tab). This can be done as a group on the board or individually for practice.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • allowing extended time to locate website and help create a web shortcut for future reference
    • verbally give teacher examples of curriculum
    • verbally tell the objective for specified TEKS
    • checking for understanding
    • providing frequent feedback
    • providing extra time for oral response
    • providing peer tutoring
    • reducing length of assignment

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Students will continue working on How to Teach Texas Style Scenario by completing the next two columns: Instructional Objectives and Explanation. Assignment will be graded using the Rubric for Converting TEKS to Instructional Objectives (see All Lesson Attachments tab).

    If time allows, the students can share their TEKS and instructional objectives. This can be presented orally or in writing.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • correcting spelling and grammar but not deducting from total on homework
    • allowing student to choose two classes to analyze from course schedule rather than entire schedule
    • checking for understanding
    • providing extra time for oral response
    • providing frequent feedback
    • providing peer tutoring
    • reducing length of assignment
    • assisting student in gathering information
    • providing praise and encouragement

  • Lesson Closure

    Review objectives, terms and definitions.

    Write the following statements on the board. Before leaving the class, students will receive one index card. On this card, they will write the following:

    • Today, I learned ____________________ about instructional objectives.
    • As an educator, I will use the information taught in this lesson by/because _________________.
    • I am still curious or have a question about __________________________.

    Have students complete graphic organizer KWL Chart – TEKS/Instructional Objectives (see All Lesson Attachments tab) to analyze what they have learned about TEKS and instructional objectives.

    Have each student attach his or her index card to his or her KWL Chart – TEKS/Instructional Objectives handout to turn in.

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Assess instructional objectives with the appropriate rubric.

    Distribute the handout Teaching Texas Style Reflection (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Inform students they will write a one-page reflective journal entry on how they will use this information when they begin writing their own lesson plans. When you explain this, make sure you review the objectives and new terminology. These should be included in their reflection pieces.

    In the future, when your students write their own lesson plans, they will be familiar with locating the TEKS and converting those into understandable objectives. They will also be comfortable with a variety of teaching styles.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • referring to IEP when assessing
    • not counting off for spelling errors in reflection
    • allowing the option for oral reflection
    • grading according to work done
    • providing praise and encouragement

  • References/Resources

    Images:

    • Microsoft Clip Art: Used with permission from Microsoft.

    Books:

    • Early Childhood Education Today, Twelfth Edition by George S. Morrison
      This book is a great resource on early childhood education. It covers the foundation of education, programs and resources for children and families, educational needs of infants through the primary grades and the special needs of children and families.
    • Exploring Teaching: An Introduction to Education by Richard Arends, Nancy E. Winitzky and Margaret D. Tannenbaum
      This book encourages students to explore what teaching is and how to become an educator.
    • Instructional Strategies: How to Teach for Rigor and Relevance by the International Center for Leadership in Education, Inc
      The most successful teachers use methods that promote student learning through a variety of instructional strategies. This book gives teachers ideas and strategies for teaching rigorous and relevant lessons that engage students and promote learning.
    • Introduction to Teaching: Becoming a Professional. Fifth Edition by Don Kauchak & Paul Eggen
      For any student going into the teaching profession, this is an excellent choice. It is an easy read for students on all levels. It covers the changing teaching profession, the foundations of education and how to become an effective teacher.
    • Teaching by Sharleen Kato
      Students will learn about the history of education and what it means to be a teacher with this textbook.

    Websites:

    • Articulate Your Learning Objectives
      Before you can decide how you will teach a lesson, you must determine what your educational goals and objectives will be for your students. The Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence & Educational Innovation at Carnegie Melon University explains how to create and align objects with classroom instruction.
      http://www.cmu.edu/teaching/designteach/design/learningobjectives.html
    • Strategies for Effective Lesson Planning
      Effective lesson planning can be tricky, but with this website from the University of Michigan, lesson planning can be a stress-free encounter.
      http://www.crlt.umich.edu/gsis/p2_5
    • Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS)
      Texas Education Agency’s list of TEKS for each grade level and subject area.
      http://www.tea.state.tx.us/

    YouTube™:

    • New Teacher Academy: Lesson Planning
      Lesson plans are the cornerstone of a teacher’s day. Learn about the key elements of any lesson plan, and watch as a new teacher creates a lesson plan step-by-step with her coach.
      http://youtu.be/lQynxXbzHvw
    • Writing Competency-based Learning Objectives
      Mark Winegar explains how to make learning objectives based on the state competencies (TEKS) for a specific course.
      http://youtu.be/zm0TEsstc_E
  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • word wall
    • predict meanings of new words
    • draw visual representations of terms on word wall
    • access http://www.learnerdictionary.com for pronunciation and meaning of terms
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Recommended Strategies

    Reading Strategies

    Assign students to read about lesson plans and instructional objectives. Information can be found in newspaper articles, magazines, journals and online print.
    Suggestions:

    • Students learn new vocabulary words and use context clues for meaning. Have the students make predictions for new words and then relate those words to their own experiences.
    • Encourage students to connect reading to their life experiences or prior knowledge.
    • Word Attack Strategies: Prior to reading, allow students to skim the passage or text, circling words that are unfamiliar to them. Once these words are decoded (glossary, dictionary, dictionary.com, classroom discussion) the student will have a better understanding of the pronunciation and meaning of the unfamiliar word(s), facilitating comprehension.
  • Quotes

    Good teaching is more a giving of right questions than a giving of right answers.
    -Josef Albers

    You are rewarding a teacher poorly if you remain always a pupil.
    -Friedrich Nietzsche

    Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.
    -Nelson Mandela

    Develop a passion for learning. If you do, you will never cease to grow.
    -Anthony J. D’Angelo

  • Multimedia/Visual Strategies

    PowerPoint ™

    • How to Teach Texas Style
    • Presentation Notes for How to Teach Texas Style

    Technology:

    • TEDTalk
      Expecting More From Teaching: Deanna LeBlanc at TEDxUniversityofNevada
      Deanna LeBlanc was the 2012 Teacher of the Year for the State of Nevada. In this talk, she discusses how teachers need to expect more from themselves and those around them.
      http://youtu.be/JSR_H3cyahU

    YouTube™:

    • New Teacher Academy: Lesson Planning
      Lesson plans are the cornerstone of a teacher’s day. Learn about the key elements of any lesson plan, and watch as a new teacher creates a lesson plan step-by-step with her coach.
      http://youtu.be/lQynxXbzHvw
    • Writing Competency-based Learning Objectives
      Mark Winegar explains how to make learning objectives based on the state competencies (TEKS) for a specific course.
      http://youtu.be/zm0TEsstc_E

    Files for downloading:

  • Graphic Organizers/Handout

    Graphic Organizer:

    • KWL Chart – TEKS/Instructional Objectives
    • Teaching Texas Style Note-taking

    Handouts

    • Compare and Contrast TEKS/Instructional Objectives
    • CTE TEKS Instructional Practices in Education and Training
    • How to Teach Texas Style TEKS/Learning Objectives Matching Activity
    • How to Teach Texas Style TEKS/Instructional Objectives Matching Activity (Key)
    • How to Teach Texas Style Scenario
    • Locating TEKS
    • Rubric for Converting TEKS to Instructional Objectives
    • Teaching Texas Style Project
    • Teaching Texas Style Reflection

    Files for downloading

  • Writing Strategies

    Journal Entries:

    • TEKS are important to a teacher because _______________________.
    • It’s important for the state of Texas to give educators guidelines on teaching subjects because _________________.
    • Without guidelines for teaching a specific subject and grade level, the school system would ____________________.

    Writing Strategy

    • Writing reflection handout Teaching Texas Style Reflection (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
    • Summary on the index cards during Lesson Closure
  • Communication 90 Second Speech Topics

    • My three favorite lessons are __________________________ because ___________________.
    • My learning style requires teachers to ___________________________.
    • Instructional objectives help teachers to ________________________.
  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    • Students will interview teachers to learn their opinions of the TEKS as well as the various teaching methods discussed in class. Allow students to create additional questions, conduct the interviews and share results with the class. Have students ask questions such as:
      • How do you determine what lesson style is appropriate for a particular subject?
      • How do you determine which class is best suited for a particular learning style?
    • Distribute the handout Teaching Texas Style Project (see All Lesson Attachments tab). For homework, students will write a brief summary, on paper, of each class they attend between the time they leave your class on one day and return the next. After the summary, they will write what they perceived to be the objective for the day. They will then access the TEA website (on their own time) to locate and identify the TEKS that accompany that objective. They may need to make modifications to the objective based on what they find. They will then explain the teaching method that was used and make suggestions for improvement. If they don’t have suggestions, they will write why the lesson was effective and engaging.
    • Students will watch the videos and provide a summary of the information and how it relates to instructional objectives.
      • New Teacher Academy: Lesson Planning
        Lesson plans are the cornerstone of a teacher’s day. Learn about the key elements of any lesson plan, and watch as a new teacher creates a lesson plan step-by-step with her coach.
        http://youtu.be/lQynxXbzHvw
      • Overview of TEKS for LOTE
        In this video, the Texas Education Agency (TEA) gives teachers an example for how to implement TEKS into the classroom, specifically Languages Other Than English classrooms.
        http://youtu.be/oNXTAwX7FPQ?list=PLu_W_IYy7yO8uBQT0rWASnMv4k-PTPJf6

    TED Talks:

    TED is a nonprofit organization devoted to spreading ideas, usually in the form of short, powerful talks (18 minutes or fewer). The video below is related to this lesson. Allow students to view the video, and lead a discussion concerning the TED Talk.
    Expecting More From Teaching: Deanna LeBlanc at TEDxUniversityofNevada
    Deanna LeBlanc was the 2012 Teacher of the Year for the State of Nevada. In this talk, she discusses how teachers need to expect more from themselves and those around them.
    http://youtu.be/JSR_H3cyahU

  • Family/Community Connection

    Invite a principal or curriculum specialist into the classroom to talk about the importance of using TEKS in lesson plans and how teachers are evaluated based on TEKS.

  • CTSO connection

    Family Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)

    http://texasfccla.org

    STAR Events:

    • Teach and Train – An individual event that recognizes participants who demonstrate their ability to explore and experience the career of teaching or training. Participants must prepare a portfolio of the teaching/training career, prepare and execute a complete lesson/workshop plan and an oral presentation. Senior and occupational participants will also complete a shadowing experience of a “best practices” educator.

    SkillsUSA

    http://skillsusa.org

    SkillsUSA Contests:

    • Early Childhood Education – An individual event that recognizes participants who demonstrate knowledge of developmentally appropriate practice and ability to prepare and implement learning activities for children three to five years old. Contestants will prepare a written lesson plan and take a written test assessing their knowledge of child development and effective teaching strategies.

    Texas Association of Future Educators

    http://tafeonline.org

    TAFE Competitions:

    • Bulletin Board – An individual or team event that recognizes participants who demonstrate their knowledge, skills, and ability to create a bulletin board display for teaching and/or for student interaction.
    • Lesson Planning and Delivery Competition – This competition is an individual event where future educators will plan, prepare and deliver a lesson of their choosing to an actual classroom of students. Self-reflection following the lesson is an essential component of this competition as future educators begin the practice of honing their own teaching skills. Participants will prepare a lesson plan and a 10 minute video teaching the lesson to a class. The lesson can focus either on CTE, Humanities or STEM.
  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to the lesson.
    http://www.ysa.org/

    Possible idea: Information can be used for future service learning projects centered on teaching such as teaching lessons to Head Start classes and assisting teachers with creating lessons.

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