How the Media Influences Consumers

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
Loading...
FavoriteLoadingAdd to favorites
  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Human Services

    Course : Dollars and Sense

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (1) The student demonstrates management of individual and family resources such as finances, food, clothing, shelter, health care, recreation, transportation, time and human capital. The student is expected to:
      • (C) develop and apply multiple strategies for individuals and families to make choices to satisfy needs and wants
      • (E) analyze the impact of media and technological advances on family and consumer decisions
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • analyze strategies to make good choices as a consumer
    • determine the impact of media on family and consumer decisions
  • Rationale

    Script:

    People engage in multiple roles throughout their lives. Some of these roles include spouse, sibling, parent or friend. The economic role a person plays has a large impact on his or her other roles. Being a wise consumer is a good trait for an individual to possess. A person needs to utilize the decision-making process in making consumer choices and understand how the media affects these decisions. It is important for individuals and families to recognize and protect themselves against scams and fraudulent and deceptive practices. Do you have the critical thinking skills to understand ads, what they’re saying, and what they want you to do?

  • Duration of Lesson

    Four 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Advergaming: A commercial in the form of a game

    Consumer: One who utilizes economic goods and services to satisfy wants and needs

    Consumer advocates: Individuals or groups who promote consumer interests in areas such as health and safety, education, redress, truthful advertising, fairness in the marketplace and environmental protection

    Deception: Misleading or giving a false impression, with detrimental results to the consumer

    Fraud: The deliberate deception of another that intentionally misleads or gains an unfair advantage and results in loss to the consumer

    Marketing: Promotion, sales and distribution of products or services

    Quackery: The promotion of unproven or fraudulent practices

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for PowerPoint™ presentation
    • computers with Internet access (be sure to follow district guidelines)

    Materials:

    • advertisements from magazines or the Internet
    • items typically purchased by consumers such as:
      • cosmetics
      • food
      • grooming products
      • clothing
      • purses
      • shoes
      • vehicles
    • newspaper advertisements
    • play money

    Supplies:

    • glue
    • magazines (to cut pictures from)
    • poster board
    • scissors

    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Anticipatory Set

    Prior to class:

    Note to Teacher: More information on finances can be found in these courses:

    Personal Money Management
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/personal-money-management/

    Managing Your Finances
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/managing-your-finances/

    The Impact of Technology on the Family Life Cycle
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/the-impact-of-technology-on-the-family-life-cycle/

    Refer to Practical Money Skills for grades 9-12 for additional lesson plans, resources and activities. Educators can use the 22 free, standards-aligned lessons in sequence or on an individual basis.
    https://www.practicalmoneyskills.com/foreducators/lesson_plans/highschool.php

    Become familiar with the 2014 Consumer Action Handbook (see All Lesson Attachments tab). You may consider ordering free copies of the new 2014 Consumer Action Handbook. Use the handbook to get help with consumer purchases, problems and complaints. Find consumer contacts for hundreds of companies and trade associations, local, state and federal government agencies, national consumer organizations and more.
    http://publications.usa.gov/USAPubs.php?PubID=5131

    Become familiar with PowerPoints™, handouts and activities.

    Display as many of the lesson-related supplies (see Materials or Specialized Equipment Needed) as you have available on a table in front of the room.

    Before class begins:

    Write the terms “marketing strategies,” “consumer” and “media” on the board or overhead. Discuss the meaning and definition of each word as it relates to individuals and families.

    Begin class with the following questions, and have students share their responses.

    On the board, write the following questions for students to answer in their daily journals or on a separate sheet of paper. Ask students to think about their families and their consumer needs.

    • How do marketing strategies affect a consumer?
    • Are you a good consumer? Explain.
    • Where do you find advertisements?
    • How does social media influence you as a consumer?
    • What are some examples of marketing strategies to which you or your family have been exposed this week?
    • What are some of your favorite Internet sites that utilize new marketing techniques?
    • How do technological advances in marketing strategies benefit consumers?
    • What are examples of fraudulent strategies to which consumers might be exposed
      as the result of new marketing technology?

    Lead students to share and discuss their responses.

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce lessons, objectives, terms and definitions.

    Distribute graphic organizer Slide Presentation Notes (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that students may take notes during the slide presentation.

    Introduce PowerPoint™ How the Media Influences Consumers (see All Lesson Attachment tab). Allow time for questions and class discussion.

    Videos included in the PowerPoint™ presentation:

    How Does Social Media Influence Buying Decision-making?
    Element212 is out on the street interviewing everyday consumers on how social media influences their buying decision-making.
    http://youtu.be/pK5KpYv50wg

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • providing students with a copy of the notes or a fill-in-the-blank note sheet to follow along with instruction
    • pairing up students with elbow partners who can assist them with verbal and written responses to the lesson

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    With a partner, students will complete Can You Spot the Online Ads? and Detecting Fraud (see All Lesson Attachments tab).

    Allow for questions and discussion.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • working with a peer tutor
    • participating in a small group/classroom

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Distribute Advertising Techniques (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout. Individually, students will research the most common techniques advertisers use to convince an individual to buy or do something. Students will write a definition or explanation for each type of technique and identify strategies to make good consumer choices to satisfy needs and wants.

    Check for understanding.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • providing specific websites or articles from which students can obtain their research information
    • providing students with a checklist or rubric to help them organize and complete all steps of the process

  • Lesson Closure

    Review lesson plan objectives, terms and definitions.

    Students will complete Lesson Closure (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout. This will be their exit pass. Student must answer the questions about what they learned before being allowed to leave the room.

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Assessments during lesson:

    • Can You Spot the Online Ads?
    • Detecting Fraud
    • Advertising Techniques

    Students will write a one-page reflection of what they have learned from this lesson and how they will apply it to their lives, now and in the future. Content of reflection may include how being a consumer is a journey and requires continual evaluation and readjustment.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • assisting students with research for assignments
    • modifying assignments if IEP calls for modification
    • giving students copies of slide presentations for study

  • References/Resources

    Images:

    • Microsoft Clip Art: Used with permission from Microsoft.

    Textbooks:

    • Campbell, S. R. (2010). Foundations of personal finance. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox.
    • Ross Lowe, 2006. Consumer education & economics, student edition. 6 Edition. Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.

    Websites:

    YouTube™:

    • How Does Social Media Influence Buying Decision-making?
      Element212 is out on the street interviewing everyday consumers on how social media influences their buying decision-making.
      http://youtu.be/pK5KpYv50wg
  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • ask students to repeat your instructions back to you to be sure they know what is expected of them before each new phase of the lesson
    • discuss vocabulary in detail and make sure everyone has a firm grasp on it before moving forward with the lesson
    • use graphic organizers and visuals to explain the lesson in detail
    • print fill-in-the-blank handouts of the PowerPoint notes for students to follow along with the lesson
    • provide note-taking assistance using Article Stop and Jot
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Recommended Strategies

    Reading Strategies

    Current Events:
    Assign students to read about the impact of media and technological advances on family and consumer decisions. Information can be found in newspaper articles, magazines, journals and online print.
    Suggestions:

    • Encourage students to connect reading to their life experiences or prior knowledge.
  • Quotes

    Every man is a consumer, and ought to be a producer. He is by constitution expensive, and needs to be rich.
    -Ralph Waldo Emerson

    What I’m always trying to say to the consumer is: buy less, choose well, make it last.
    -Vivienne Westwood

    As a consumer, you want to associate with brands whose powerful presence creates a halo effect that rubs off on you.
    -Tom Peters

    In e-commerce, your prices have to be better because the consumer has to take a leap of faith in your product.
    -Ashton Kutcher

    We are witnessing a seismic change in consumer behavior. That change is being brought about by technology and the access people have to information.
    -Howard Schultz

  • Multimedia/Visual Strategies

    PowerPoint™:

    • How the Media Influences Consumers
    • Presentation Notes for How the Media Influences Consumers

    Technology:

    • TED Talk:
      • Paul Piff: Does money make you mean?
        It’s amazing what a rigged game of Monopoly can reveal. In this entertaining but sobering talk, social psychologist Paul Piff shares his research into how people behave when they feel wealthy. (Hint: badly.) But while the problem of inequality is a complex and daunting challenge, there’s good news too.
        http://www.ted.com/talks/paul_piff_does_money_make_you_mean

    YouTube™:

    • How Does Social Media Influence Buying Decision-making?
      Element212 is out on the street interviewing everyday consumers on how social media influences their buying decision-making.
      http://youtu.be/pK5KpYv50wg

    Files for downloading:

  • Graphic Organizers/Handout

    Graphic Organizers:

    • Slide Presentation Notes

    Handouts:

    • Advertising Techniques
    • Can You Spot the Online Ads?
    • Detecting Fraud
    • Lesson Closure
    • 2014 Consumer Action Handbook

    Files for downloading:

  • Writing Strategies

    Journal Entries:

    • Social media influences my purchasing decisions by ______________.
    • It is important for individuals and families to recognize factors that impact their consumer-making decisions because__________________.
    • Technology has increased ways products and services are marketed by ________________.
    • Some examples of fraudulent strategies to which consumers might be exposed as the result of new marketing technology are_____________________.

    Writing Strategy:

    RAFT Writing Strategy
    Role – Federal Trade Commission officer
    Audience – High school students
    Format – Newsletter
    Topic – How to protect yourself against scams and fraud

  • Communication 90 Second Speech Topics

    • Technological advances in marketing strategies benefit consumers by ___________________.
    • The last purchase I made online was _________________.
    • I can protect myself against scams and fraudulent practices by ______________________.
  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    • Research the latest statistics on effects of societal, demographic and economic trends on individuals and the family.
    • Have students contrast planned versus unplanned purchases and cite examples of impulse purchases they have made.
    • Have students interview individuals to determine factors that contribute to unplanned or impulse purchases, examples of unplanned purchases individuals later regretted and suggestions for avoiding impulse purchases.
    • Review the importance of analyzing needs and wants in light of goals and priorities.
    • Have students differentiate between needs and wants by citing examples of each.
    • Create a visual display of marketing strategies that utilize technology.
    • TED Talk:
      TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks videos and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event.
      The video below is related to this lesson. Allow students to view the video and lead a discussion concerning the TED Talk.
      • Paul Piff: Does money make you mean?
        It’s amazing what a rigged game of Monopoly can reveal. In this entertaining but sobering talk, social psychologist Paul Piff shares his research into how people behave when they feel wealthy. (Hint: badly.) But while the problem of inequality is a complex and daunting challenge, there’s good news too.
        http://www.ted.com/talks/paul_piff_does_money_make_you_mean

    Dollars and Sense Math Assessment Problems

    • (1) The student demonstrates management of individual and family resources such as finances, food, clothing, shelter, health care, recreation, transportation, time, and human capital. The student is expected to:
      • (C) develop and apply multiple strategies for individuals and families to make choices to satisfy needs and wants

    Question 4. Analyze the chart below.

    chart

    If the chart encompasses all of the family expenses, how much does the family need to earn to be able to put 10% into savings and still pay all bills?
    a. $2,028
    b. $2,254
    c. $2,502
    d. $3,006

    Answer: B

  • Family/Community Connection

    Guest Speakers options include:

    • Better Business Bureaus in Texas
    • Identity Theft Resource Center
    • Consumer Protection Agencies
    • Customer Service manager
    • Financial advisers and planners
    • Have students conduct research on deceptive or fraudulent practices that especially target older adults. Lead students to prepare and present a program for older adults to provide information to protect them against such practices. Examples of program topics include examples of deceptive and fraudulent practices (including recent newspaper or Internet articles on specific practices), special precautions related to the impact of technology on marketing strategies and consumer fraud, and sources of protection and services to which individuals can turn with questions and complaints.
  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)

    http://www.texasfccla.org

    National Program

    Financial Fitness
    The FCCLA Financial Fitness national peer education program involves youth teaching one another how to make, save and spend money wisely. Through FCCLA’s Financial Fitness program, youth plan and carry out projects that help them and their peers learn to become wise financial managers and smart consumers.

  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to the lesson. For additional information on service learning see
    http://www.ysa.org/

    Have students develop and disseminate a brochure summarizing how to be a savvy consumer to help families learn money management skills, deal with media scams or seek professional resources at appropriate times.

No Comments

Leave A Reply