How May I Help You? Communication and Telephone Strategies

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Hospitality and Tourism

    Course : Restaurant Management

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (1) The student gains academic knowledge and skills required to pursue the full range of career and postsecondary education opportunities within the restaurant industry. The student is expected to:
      • (A) organize oral and written information
    • (2) The student uses verbal and nonverbal communication skills to create, express and interpret information for providing a positive experience for guests and employees. The student is expected to:
      • (C) demonstrate proper techniques for answering restaurant phones
      • (D) interpret verbal and nonverbal cues to enhance communication with coworkers, employers, customers and clients
      • (E) apply active listening skills to obtain and clarify information
    • (3) The student solves problems using critical thinking, innovation and creativity independently and in teams. The student is expected to:
      • (A) generate creative ideas to solve problems by brainstorming possible solutions
      • (B) employ critical-thinking and interpersonal skills to resolve conflicts with individuals such as coworkers, customers, clients and employers
    • (7) The student uses leadership and teamwork skills in collaborating with others to accomplish organizational goals and objectives. The student is expected to:
      • (B) apply decision-making and problem-solving skills
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • analyze communication skills
    • identify strategies for answering business telephones
    • demonstrate proper skills and techniques for using a telephone
    • demonstrate techniques for taking messages
  • Rationale

    Communication is one of the most important skills in work and in life. These skills will enable you to work with customers, co-workers and employers. These skills will also allow you to communicate proficiently over the business telephone dealing with various people and situations. Let’s get started!

  • Duration of Lesson

    Three 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Business telephones: A system where multiple telephones are used by businesses in an interconnected fashion that allows for features such as call handling and transferring, conference calling, call metering and accounting, private and shared voice message boxes and more

    Communication: The process of sending and receiving information by talk, gestures or writing for some type of response or action

    Nonverbal communication: The process of communication through sending and receiving wordless (mostly visual) cues between people that includes gestures, facial expressions and body language

    Telephone: An apparatus, system or process for transmission of sound or speech to a distant point, especially by an electric device

    Verbal communication: The sharing of information between individuals by using speech

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for PowerPoint™ presentation
    • computers with Internet access (be sure to follow district guidelines for Internet access)
    • light projector (Elmo)
    • presenter remote

    Materials:

    • cardstock
    • notepaper for messages
    • pictures of various business telephones (if actual phones unavailable)

    Supplies:

    • for communication activity:
      • objects (small, various)
      • paper bags (small)
    • telephones (various styles)

    —-

    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)

  • Anticipatory Set

    Before class begins:

    Display as many items from the Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed tab as you have available in the front of the classroom so that students see them as they enter.

    Begin the lesson by asking students the following questions:

    • Before telephones existed, how did people communicate?
    • How did people in the past communicate over a distance?
    • Is what you say more or less important than how you say it?
    • How else do people communicate today?
    • How has communication changed in the last 5 to 10 years?
    • How do restaurants communicate today?

    Distribute the graphic organizer KWL – Communication and Telephone Strategies (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and have students complete the first two sections.

    • K – What do I KNOW about communication and telephone strategies?
    • W – What do I WANT to know about communication and telephone strategies?

    The last section will be completed during lesson closure.

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Review lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Distribute the graphic organizer The Communication Process and the handout How May I Help You? Communication and Telephone Strategies Notes (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Students will be expected to take notes during the slide presentation.

    Introduce the PowerPoint™ How May I Help You? Communication and Telephone Strategies (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and begin a discussion with your students.

    View the YouTube™ video:

    • 4 Tips for Better Phone Communication
      When it comes to communicating over the telephone, are you putting your best foot forward or are you just phoning it in?
      Learn how to radiate personality over the phone with the four simple strategies.
      http://youtu.be/Kv3q2vcGq74

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • highlight materials for emphasis
    • provide students with vocabulary list with definitions prior to lesson

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Follow the directions on the handout Misunderstanding (see All Lesson Attachments tab) from The Food Project Communication Activities.

    Provide paper bags filled with small items from your classroom.

    Examples:

    • battery
    • cookie cutter
    • eraser
    • spoon
    • paper clip
    • timer

    This activity will illustrate the importance of good communication.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • encourage participation
    • peer tutor

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Before class:
    Print the Phone Courtesy Scenarios (see All Lesson Attachments tab) on cardstock. Cut and separate and place in a basket. Blank cards are available to add more scenarios.

    Display handout Top Ten Telephone Practices (see All Lesson Attachments tab) on a light projector and discuss each step with the class. Demonstrate using a phone if possible.

    The following questions may be asked:

    • Do you agree with the practices or should any be replaced?
    • Should the list be expanded to include additional practices and skills?
    • Are any of these practices unique to the restaurant industry?
    • Would any of these practices not apply to phone courtesy?

    Allow each student to draw a card from the basket and take turns role-playing the scenario. Allow them time to practice the phone scenario and take notes.

    Guide the students as they act out the phone or radio calls.

    Note: cell phones may be used but be sure to check with the school district guidelines.

    Distribute Rubric for Phone Courtesy Role-Play (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that students may understand what is expected.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • extended time for assignment
    • work with a peer tutor

  • Lesson Closure

    Review lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Have students complete the last section on their KWL – Communication and Telephone Strategies (see All Lesson Attachments tab).

    • L – What did I LEARN about communication and telephone strategies?

    Ask the students to describe a future form of communication they believe will be useful in the restaurant business in 10 years. This is an opportunity for the students to use their imaginations.

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Students will present phone courtesy scenarios.

    Students will be assessed with appropriate rubric.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • praise participation
    • opportunity to respond orally

  • References/Resources

    Images:

    • Microsoft Office Clip Art: Used with permission from Microsoft.

    Textbooks:

    • Culinary essentials. (2010) Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw Hill.
    • Foundations of restaurant management & culinary arts. (2011). Boston: Prentice Hall.
    • Littrell, J. J., Clasen, A. H. & Pearson, P. (2004). From school to work. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox.
    • Reynolds, J. S. (2010). Hospitality services: Food & lodging. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox.

    Website:

    YouTube™:

    • 4 Tips for Better Phone Communication
      When it comes to communicating over the telephone, are you putting your best foot forward or are you just phoning it in?
      Learn how to radiate personality over the phone with the four simple strategies.
      http://youtu.be/Kv3q2vcGq74
  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • use “word wall” for vocabulary words
    • work with a peer tutor
    • peer to read materials
    • highlighted materials for emphasis
    • shortened simplified instructions
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks
    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    TED Talks:

    TED is a nonprofit organization devoted to spreading ideas, usually in the form of short, powerful talks (18 minutes or less).

    The video below is related to this lesson. Allow students to view the video and lead a discussion concerning the TED Talk.

  • Family/Community Connection

    Invite a restaurant manager to speak to the class about how important communication and telephone skills are to the restaurant business.

  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career, Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)

    http://www.texasfccla.org

    • Star Events:
      • Hospitality, Tourism and Recreation is an individual or team event that recognizes participants who demonstrate their knowledge of the hospitality, tourism and recreation industries and ability to translate their knowledge into a hypothetical or real business.

    Lesson is preparation for Hospitality LEO test.

  • Service Learning Projects

    True service learning is developed with student voice about concerns and needs. As the students are learning and researching this topic, ask them to think about ways they can maximize their learning to benefit others.
    For more information, visit:
    www.ysa.org

    Brainstorm with your students for a service project pertaining to this lesson. Ask students how they will use what they have learned about communication and telephone skills.

    Example:
    Students could organize a phone bank in their community to fundraise for a particular cause. This will allow them to practice phone courtesy.