Hotel Marketing and Communication: The Cornerstones

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
Loading...
FavoriteLoadingAdd to favorites
  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Hospitality and Tourism

    Course : Hotel Management

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (1) The student gains academic knowledge and skills required to pursue the full range of career and postsecondary education opportunities within the hotel industry. The student is expected to:
      • (A) organize oral and written information
      • (B) compose a variety of written documents such as agendas, thank you letters, presentations, and advertisements
    • (2) The student uses verbal and nonverbal communication skills to create, express, and interpret information for providing a positive experience for guests and employees. The student is expected to:
      • (B) analyze various marketing strategies for a hotel or an available service
      • (D) interpret verbal and nonverbal cues to enhance communication with individuals such as coworkers, customers, and clients
      • (E) locate written information used to communicate with individuals such as coworkers and customers
      • (G) follow directions and procedures independently
    • (5) The student develops principles in time management, decision-making, effective communication, and prioritizing. The student is expected to:
      • (A) apply effective practices for managing time and energy
      • (C) analyze various steps in the decision-making process
    • (8) The student uses information technology tools specific to hotel management to access, manage, integrate, and create information. The student is expected to:
      • (E) evaluate Internet resources for industry information
    • (9) The student uses leadership and teamwork skills in collaborating with others to accomplish organizational goals and objectives. The student is expected to:
      • (A) apply team-building skills
      • (B) apply decision-making and problem-solving skills
      • (C) apply leadership and teamwork qualities in creating a pleasant work atmosphere
      • (D) participate in community leadership and teamwork opportunities to enhance professional skills
    • (12) The student understands the knowledge and skills required for careers in the hotel management industry. The student is expected to:
      • (A) develop job-specific technical vocabulary
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • understand the elements of the marketing mix and how they work together
    • explain the importance of a marketing plan
    • evaluate various marketing strategies
    • demonstrate proper techniques for using telecommunication equipment
    • create promotional tools
  • Rationale

    Script:

    What would happen if you opened a business and didn’t have any products that people wanted to buy? How do you know what people need or want? What would happen if you opened a store and no one came because they didn’t know it existed? How do people find out about new stores? This lesson examines and answers these questions and more. Without these answers, businesses would soon be out of business and therefore the answers are considered cornerstones of successful hotel marketing.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Five 45 minutes class periods

  • Word Wall

    Cornerstone: Also called foundation – originally it was the first stone laid in the corner of where two walls meet in a new building – it is used here to mean the foundation of business, vitally important

    Market: A market consists of all of the people that are able and willing to potentially buy a product being offered

    Marketing Mix: A combination of decisions made about product, price, place, and promotion – also called the 4P’s of marketing

    Market Segment: A subgroup of a market; will have similar needs and wants for the products being offered

    Market Segmentation: The process of dividing a large market into market segments

    Target Market: The market segment on which a business will choose to focus

    Telecommunications: Communication over a distance; the transmission of words, symbols, images, and data over a distance through technology such as telephones, radio, televisions, cell phones, and the internet

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for PowerPoint™ presentation
    • computers with Internet access (be sure to follow district guidelines for Internet access.)
    • presenter remote

    Materials:

    • hotel branded items:
      • candy
      • notepads
      • pens
      • robes
      • shampoos
      • soaps
      • towels
      • water bottles
    • hotel brochures and flyers from various hotels
    • hotel magazine advertisements

    Supplies:

    • colored pencils
    • markers
    • paper

    —-

    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)

  • Anticipatory Set

    Before class begins:

    Display as many materials as you have available in the front of the classroom so that students see them as they enter (see Materials or Specialized Equipment Needed tab).
    —-
    Begin the lesson by asking students the following questions:

    • How do hotels get people to stay at their property (versus another hotel)?
    • Why do you think hotels advertise?
    • Why do hotels put their name on soaps and shampoos?
    • Why do they put their name on robes?
    • What would happen if you opened a budget hotel but charged $400 for one night’s stay?

    Distribute the KWL graphic organizer Hotel Marketing and Communication (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and have students fill out the first two boxes of the chart. Ask students to write down what they already know about marketing and communication from their personal experiences. The last box will be completed during lesson closure.

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Review lesson objectives, terms, and definitions.

    Introduce the PowerPoint™ Hotel Marketing and Communication: The Cornerstones (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and begin discussion with students. Distribute graphic organizer Hotel Marketing and Communication Notes (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Students will be expected to take notes during the slide presentation.

    Announce to students that a quiz will be administered at the end of the lesson.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • highlight materials for emphasis
    • provide students with vocabulary list with definitions prior to lesson
    • work with a peer tutor
    • use study guides
    • provide printed slide presentation

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Divide the class into subgroups of three or four students.

    Distribute graphic organizer The Marketing Mix (see All Lesson Attachments tab) to each group. Allow each group to choose a different local hotel and guide them through the 4P’s of Marketing using a local restaurant as an example. Be sure to discuss how the 4 P’s are inter-related.

    Refer to the Marketing Mix (Key) (see All Lesson Attachments tab) for guidance on a restaurant and hotel marketing mix example.

    For a restaurant:

    • the product is the food and level of service
    • the restaurant price is relative to the type of restaurant, (fast food is low pricing, high-end steakhouse is high pricing, and so forth)
    • the restaurant place/distribution is the location of the restaurant (or multiple locations, as well as local versus city-wide versus global)
    • the restaurant promotion is typically phone book, local ads in newspaper, Internet and possibly billboards. If a nation chain restaurant, then advertising could include television.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • work with a peer tutor
    • check for understanding
    • encourage participation

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Allow the groups to remain the same or regroup the students.

    Distribute hotel brochures to each group and guide the students through a comparison of the brochures (some groups could compare magazine or yellow pages advertisements), pointing out where there are similarities and differences.
    Most brochures will contain information about the amenities such as items included in each room (hair dryers, ironing boards, coffee makers) and the hotel offerings, such as coffee bar in lounge, restaurants in hotel, availability of spa, or pool.

    Assign Hotel Brochure Activity (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Explain the project in detail and review the Hotel Brochure Rubric (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so the students will understand how each component will be assessed.

    Students will work independently to create a brochure for a fictitious hotel. Monitor students as they work to remain focused on assignment.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • reduce assignment
    • extended time for assignment
    • work with a peer tutor
    • encourage participation

  • Lesson Closure

    Review lesson objectives, terms, and definitions.

    Students complete the last column of the KWL Chart Hotel Marketing and Communication (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Review and discuss answers.

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Student brochures will be assessed with the Hotel Brochure Rubic (see All Lesson Attachments tab).

    Administer and assess Marketing and Communication: The Cornerstone Quiz (see All Lesson Attachments tab).

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • reduce assignment
    • extended time to complete quiz
    • highlight fewer options

  • References/Resources

    Textbooks:

    • Reynolds, Johnny Sue, Hospitality Services Food & Lodging, Second Edition, Tinley Park, Illinois: The Goodheart-Willcox Company, Inc., 2010. Print.
    • Farese, Kimbrell, Woloszyk,_ Marketing Essentials_, Woodland Hills, California: Glencoe McGraw-Hill, Inc., 2002. Print.
  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • use word wall for vocabulary words
    • work with a peer tutor
    • peer to read materials
    • highlighted materials for emphasis
    • shortened simplified instructions
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Recommended Strategies

    Reading Strategies

    Encourage students to read more about marketing and communication.

    Hotel Business.com
    The vertical portal bringing you late breaking news and analysis in a real time format – personalized by you to guarantee you get only the news and information you want when you want it.
    http://hotelbusiness.com/hb/main.asp

    Allow students to research and identify examples of various marketing strategies and types of communication and promotion. Use the pre-reading strategy prediction.

    Encourage students to connect reading and their life experiences or prior knowledge.

  • Quotes

    The aim of marketing is to know and understand the customer so well the product or service fits him and sells itself.
    -Peter Drucker

    Marketing is too important to be left to the marketing department.
    -David Packard

    All lasting business is built on friendship.
    -Alfred A. Montapert

    If you listen to your fears, you will die never knowing what a great person you might have been.
    -Robert H. Schuller

    Be a yardstick of quality. Some people aren’t used to an environment where excellence is expected.
    -Steve Jobs

  • Multimedia/Visual Strategies

    PowerPoint™:

    • Hotel Marketing and Communication: The Cornerstones
    • Presentation Notes – Hotel Marketing and Communication: The Cornerstones

    Technology:

    Files for downloading:

  • Graphic Organizers/Handout

    Graphic Organizers:

    • Hotel Marketing and Communication KWL
    • Hotel Marketing and Communication Notes
    • The Marketing Mix
    • The Marketing Mix (Key)

    Handouts:

    • Hotel Brochure Activity
    • Hotel Brochure Rubric
    • Hotel Marketing and Communication: The Cornerstones Quiz
    • Hotel Marketing and Communication: The Cornerstones Quiz (Key)

    Files for downloading:

  • Writing Strategies

    Journal Entries:

    • When someone says “Marketing” I immediately think …..
    • My favorite place in a hotel is …..
    • My favorite way to communicate is ….. (and why)
    • The best way to communicate with someone who wishes to stay at your hotel but is from another country and doesn’t speak English is by …..
    • The best ways a hotel can accommodate a person in a wheelchair is by …..

    Writing Strategy:

    RAFT (Role/Audience/Format/Topic) writing strategy:

    • Role: student
    • Audience: marketing manager in a local hotel
    • Format: letter asking the marketing manager why they chose marketing for a career; what they like most about their career; what the drawbacks are, if any; and what type of education is needed for a marketing career in the hotel industry
    • Topic: career investigation

  • Communication 90 Second Speech Topics

    • If I were to add another “P” to the four P’s of Marketing it would be …..
    • Hotels can communicate by these three methods ……
    • Five ways hotels can advertise are …..
  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    In groups of 2 or 3, have students make a list of nonverbal communications such as facial expressions, body positions, eye movement, and throat noises and have a representative from each group present their list to the class. Make a combined list, then have students take turns acting out the nonverbal communications and other students interpreting the cues.

    Hotel Management Multiple Choice Math Assessment Problems

    • (2) The student uses verbal and nonverbal communication skills to create, express, and interpret information for providing a positive experience for guests and employees. The student is expected to:
      • (B) analyze various marketing techniques for a hotel or an available service.

  • Family/Community Connection

    Ask a marketing manager from a local hotel to speak to the class on how they market their hotel and how that is different from a product people buy from a store.

    Invite a communications specialist to speak to the class on the importance and impact of nonverbal communication.

  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career, Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)

    http://www.texasfccla.org

    • Star Events:
      Hospitality, Tourism and Recreation is an individual or team event that recognizes participants who demonstrate their knowledge of the hospitality, tourism, and recreation industries and ability to translate their knowledge into a hypothetical or real business.

    Lesson is preparation for Hospitality LEO test.

  • Service Learning Projects

    True service learning is developed with student voice about concerns and needs. As the students are learning and researching this topic, ask them to think about ways they can maximize their learning to benefit others.

    Ask students how they will use what they have learned about marketing and communications.

    Use the LEADERS Model from http://www.servicelearning.org. Brainstorm with your students for a service project pertaining to this lesson.

    Example:

    • Students can create a skit on communication, stressing the impact that nonverbal communication has on relationships, and present the skit to elementary students.
    • Students can partner with a local hotel to host a charity benefit that they coordinate and market.