Helping Clients: Treatment Options for Drug Dependency

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Human Services

    Course : Counseling and Mental Health

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (1) The student applies mathematics, science, English language arts and social studies in health science. The student is expected to:
      • (G) compare social services such as drug dependency rehabilitation centers
    • (3) The student researches career options and the preparation necessary for employment in mental health. The student is expected to:
      • (F) investigate treatment options (drug dependency)
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • analyze the effects of substance abuse on the body
    • explore drug dependency rehabilitation centers
  • Rationale

    Script:

    Throughout history, cultures have used psychoactive drugs for various purposes such as: recreation, rituals, ceremonies, and medicinal. A major concern for today’s medical professionals is substance abuse and its effect on society. What do you think are the most commonly abused drugs? What impact does the substance abuse have on families, communities and the country? This is a sensitive topic that needs to be taken seriously. In preparation for careers in the field of counseling and mental health, this lesson will provide an excellent opportunity for you to understand the effects of substance abuse and treatment options.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Five 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Alcoholic: Uncontrolled drinking and preoccupation with alcohol

    Alcoholics Anonymous® (AA): Alcoholics Anonymous is a voluntary, worldwide fellowship of men and women from all walks of life who meet together to attain and maintain sobriety

    Dependence: The state of being addicted to alcohol or a drug

    Depressant: A chemical substance (such as a drug) that makes a body’s systems less active

    Detoxification: To cause (someone) to stop using drugs or alcohol by providing special help and treatment

    Drug: An illegal and often harmful substance (such as heroin, cocaine, LSD, or marijuana) that people take for pleasure

    Drug abuse: Deliberately taking a substance for other than its intended purpose and in a manner that can result in damage to the person’s health or his/her ability to function

    Nicotine: A poisonous substance in tobacco that makes it difficult for people to stop smoking cigarettes

    Over-the-counter (OTC) drugs: Medicines sold directly to a consumer without a prescription from a healthcare professional, as compared to prescription drugs, which may be sold only to consumers possessing a valid prescription

    Sobriety: The state of not being drunk

    Stimulants: Something (such as a drug) that makes you more active or gives you more energy

    Note: Many other terms on the slide presentation can be identified. Encourage students to include the definition in the assignment.

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for PowerPoint™ presentation
    • computers with Internet access (be sure to follow district guidelines)

    Materials:

    Supplies:

    • butcher paper
    • foam ball
    • markers
    • poster boards
    • tape

    Other appropriate lessons

    Careers in Counseling and Mental Health
    Counseling and Mental Health
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/careers-in-counseling-and-mental-health/

    Personality Disorders: A Class of Their Own
    Counseling and Mental Health
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/personality-disorders-a-class-of-their-own/

    Stop the Anxiety
    Counseling and Mental Health
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/stop-the-anxiety/

    You may opt to download the teacher guides written by the National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA) Blog Team, which describe the latest science-based information about drug abuse and addiction. The guides include:

    • Brain Development: The Teen Brain
    • Drugs of Abuse
    • Topics Related to Drug Abuse and Addiction
    • Teaching Teens the Science of Addiction

    Guides can be downloaded at
    http://teens.drugabuse.gov/educators/nida-teaching-guides/drugs-and-health-blog-teaching-guides-teen-drug-abuse

    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Anticipatory Set

    Prior to class:

    Become familiar with the PowerPoint™, handouts and activities.

    Display as many of the lesson-related supplies (see Materials or Specialized Equipment Needed) as you have available on a table in front of the room.

    Draw a large shield on a poster board or butcher paper. Divide the shield into four sections and label the sections: alcohol, drugs, tobacco and over-the-counter drugs. Display the shield on a wall.

    Before class begins:

    As the students walk into the classroom, hand each a marker and have them select one of the shield sections. Under the heading, write one possible effect of abusing alcohol, drugs, tobacco or over-the-counter drugs. Discuss the results as a class.

    Possible questions for discussion:

    • What is the difference between use and abuse of drugs?
    • Why do you think some teenagers believe it is okay to use drugs?
    • What are some motives behind a person using drugs?
    • Do you think drugs are a good and bad thing?
    • Why should a woman avoid drinking when she is pregnant?
    • Why do commercials glamorize drinking?

    Have students brainstorm reasons why a person might abuse drugs. Ask them to identify the emotional, social and financial effects of on individuals, families and communities.

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Note to teacher: Prior to beginning this lesson, please review, preview and select the appropriate multimedia for your classes.

    Review lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Students will complete the graphic organizer, Slide Presentation Notes (see All Lesson Attachments tab) during the PowerPoint™ presentation. Inform students that they will be expected to take notes and participate in discussions while viewing the slide presentation.

    Introduce the PowerPoint™ Helping Clients: Treatment Options for Drug Dependency (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Use the appropriate notes from Presentation Notes for Helping Clients: Treatment Options for Drug Dependency (see All Lesson Attachments tab) for discussion.

    Videos included in the slide presentation:

    • Anyone Can Become Addicted to Drugs
      You might think that only some types of people can get addicted to drugs. The truth is, it can happen to anyone, whether you’re young or old, rich or poor, male or female. This video from NIDA explains addiction in simple terms and offers a hotline to help you or a loved one find treatment.
      http://youtu.be/SY2luGTX7Dk
    • Best Drug Rehab Center | Find the Best Drug Rehab Center Today
      This video includes information about the predominate theory of addiction along with the three phases of addiction. For drug and alcohol addiction treatment, it’s important to find a recovery program that fits.
      https://youtu.be/1GCex5ReG58
    • The Faces of Drug Addiction
      No one is immune to the evils of drug addiction, whether it’s a friend, a family member, or a neighbor. In this story we introduce you to two young men who you would never think would be recovering drug addicts, and it all started with the over-the-counter pain killers.
      http://youtu.be/QR0rneaFego

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • checking for understanding
    • providing assistance
    • providing frequent praise

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Distribute the Drug Dependency Double Puzzle (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout. Individually, students will complete the double puzzle using the Slide Presentation Notes. Students will unscramble each of the clue words and copy the letters in the numbered cells to other cells with the same number. After they unscramble the words, the students will select five words to write five lesson-related sentences.

    Allow time for completion. (Key) Drug Dependency Double Puzzle (see All Lesson Attachments tab) has been provided for you to check students’ answers.

    Check for understanding.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • providing peer tutoring
    • reducing length of assignment
    • providing frequent praise

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Scenario: You have been offered an internship opportunity in the area of counseling and mental health. Your task will focus on conducting risk and substance abuse assessments.

    In small groups, students will research a drug dependency rehabilitation center. Distribute the Drug Dependency Rehabilitation Centers (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout. You may opt to assign each group a specific rehabilitation center at http://www.quitalcohol.com/guides/top-10-drug-rehab-centers.html.

    The research should include the following information:

    • Amenities provided
    • Careers related to rehab centers
    • Cost of rehabilitation program
    • Detoxification programs
    • Effects of drug abuse and addiction
    • Extended care and long-term rehabilitation
    • Inpatient addiction treatment
    • Intervention program
    • Location
    • Outpatient rehabilitation options
    • Payment options or financial plans
    • Physical conditions of the center
    • Recovery process
    • Rehabilitation process
    • Residential substance abuse treatment
    • Sober living services
    • Staff to patient ratio

    The information will be presented as an infographic. To obtain ideas on an infographic, refer the students to view infographics at
    http://teens.drugabuse.gov/educators/stats-and-infographics

    They may also use free tools for creating infographics at
    http://www.creativebloq.com/infographic/tools-2131971

    If computers are not available, students may design a poster to include all the required information.

    Distribute Rubric for Drug Dependency Rehabilitation Centers (see All Lesson Attachments tab) ) so that students will understand what is expected.

    Allow sufficient time for research and preparation of their infographic. Each group will present their infographic during Summative/End of Lesson Assessment.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • assisting student in gathering information
    • providing praise and encouragement

  • Lesson Closure

    Review lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    At the end of the lesson provide students with the opportunity to review what they have learned. Students will stand in a circle and throw a foam or paper ball to each other. When the student has the ball in their hand, they have to tell the class one fact they learned from the lesson. Repeat until all students have stated a fact pertaining to the lesson.

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Each group will present their infographic. Infographics will be assessed with Rubric for Drug Dependency Rehabilitation Centers.

    Compare and contrast the drug dependency rehabilitation center infographics. Which centers offered the best detoxification programs? Intervention programs? Inpatient addiction treatment? Outpatient rehabilitation options?

    At the end of the presentations, give students an opportunity to demonstrate overall understanding of concepts and skills by asking the following four open-minded questions:

    • What new career paths did you discover that you had never thought of before?
    • How did the chosen profession match your current interests?
    • How can this information help you towards your career path?
    • How can you use this information in the future?

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • grading according to mastery of work
    • assisting students in gathering information
    • providing frequent praise

  • References/Resources

    Images:

    • National Institute on Drug Abuse.
    • Photos obtained through a license with Shutterstock.com™.

    Textbook:

    • Barry, Patricia D., Mental health and mental illness. Seventh Edition, Lippincott, 2002. Print.

    Websites:

    • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration
      Prevention of Substance Abuse and Mental Illness. Creating communities where individuals, families, schools, faith based organizations and workplaces take action to promote emotional health and reduce the likelihood of mental illness, substance abuse including tobacco and suicide.
      www.samhsa.gov

    YouTube™:

    • Anyone Can Become Addicted to Drugs
      You might think that only some types of people can get addicted to drugs. The truth is, it can happen to anyone, whether you’re young or old, rich or poor, male or female. This video from NIDA explains addiction in simple terms and offers a hotline to help you or a loved one find treatment.
      http://youtu.be/SY2luGTX7Dk
    • Best Drug Rehab Center | Find the Best Drug Rehab Center Today
      This video includes information about the predominate theory of addiction along with the three phases of addiction. For drug and alcohol addiction treatment, it’s important to find a recovery program that fits.
      https://youtu.be/1GCex5ReG58
    • The Faces of Drug Addiction
      No one is immune to the evils of drug addiction, whether it’s a friend, a family member, or a neighbor. In this story we introduce you to two young men who you would never think would be recovering drug addicts, and it all started with the over-the-counter pain killers.
      http://youtu.be/QR0rneaFego
  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • Word wall
    • Journal entries
    • Additional time to prepare written paper
    • Ask students to repeat your instructions back to you to be sure they know what is expected of them.
    • Discuss vocabulary in detail, making sure students understand before moving on.
    • Use graphic organizers and visuals to help explain the lesson.
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    • Research how drugs have affected athletes, locally and professionally. How has drug abuse affected the Olympics and should the athletes competing in Olympic events be tested for drugs?
    • Distribute the Recall and Response (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout. Students will recall and respond to quotes and information pertaining to the lesson.
    • In groups of three, students will develop five role-play situations that can be used to say no to drugs and alcohol. If students have the appropriate tools and methods of saying ‘no’, it will make it easier for them to say ‘no’ when confronted with a situation when drugs and alcohol are offered to them. Students will present the role-play of their choice to the class.
    • Have students work in small groups to research and create a chart on the differences between four careers associated with drug dependency. You may opt to assign each group specific careers. The careers associated with drug dependency can include:
      • addiction counselor
      • addiction nurses
      • clinical psychologist
      • counseling psychologist
      • criminal psychologist
      • detoxification specialist
      • mental health and substance abuse social worker
      • pediatric nurse
      • psychiatric nurse
      • psychiatrist
      • substance abuse researcher
    • Teens travel into the future and reconstruct the science of substance abuse through interactive learning adventures. Provided by the Center for Technology in Teaching and Learning, Rice University. A teaching guide is provided for the teacher, including a synopsis of each case, additional activities and assessments. Three independent web adventures tackle the neuroscience of drug abuse and help teens learn about the health effects of inhalants, ecstasy and opioids. Each adventure is divided into three to five episodes that are playable in 30-45 minutes. In each adventure, players help solve a drug-related case or problem. They gather scientific evidence, collect and interpret data, conduct laboratory experiments and consult with experts to solve the case. They learn how drugs affect the body, especially the nervous system, so that they can make wise health choices when encountering drugs.
      As they solve the virtual problems, teens gain:
    • Interactive website where students can explore jobs in the field of science. Teacher resources and keys are also provided. Website is sponsored by the Center for Technology in Teaching and Learning, Rice University. Students can receive a certificate of accomplishment for each career they opted to explore.
      http://coolsciencecareers.rice.edu/

    TEDx Talk:

    TED is a nonprofit organization devoted to spreading ideas, usually in the form of short, powerful talks (18 minutes or fewer).

    TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks videos and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event.

    TED-Ed’s commitment to creating lessons worth sharing is an extension of TED’s mission of spreading great ideas. This allows users to take any useful educational video, not just TED’s, and easily create a customized lesson around the video.

    The video below is related to the lesson. Allow students to view the video, and lead a discussion concerning the TED Talk.

    Addiction and trust: Marc Lewis at TEDxRadboudU 2013
    A former drug addict himself, Lewis now researches addiction. In order to get over ones addiction, he explains, self-trust is necessary.
    http://youtu.be/e3p_LuTM73k

  • Family/Community Connection

    • Invite a counselor for Alcoholics Anonymous to speak to the class about the effects of alcohol abuse and the impact the abuse has on families, communities and the country.
    • Invite a police officer or federal officer to speak on the legal consequences of marijuana and alcohol use.
  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)
    http://texasfccla.org

    STAR Events:

    • Chapter Service Project (Display and Manual): A team event – recognizes chapters that develop and implement an in-depth service project that makes a worthwhile contribution to families, schools, and communities. Students must use Family and Consumer Sciences content and skills to address and take action on a community need.
    • Families First- Students display research posters, mobiles, tri-fold boards on substance abuse at a school open house or community fair.
  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to lesson. For additional information on service learning see:
    http://www.nylc.org/

    Possible idea:
    Students can host a drug awareness fair. Additional information, ideas for hosting the event. getting activity ideas, ordering free material and online toolkit can be obtained at
    http://teens.drugabuse.gov/national-drug-facts-week/promote-events

    Also see Family/Community connections.

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