Guest Services – First Impressions

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Hospitality and Tourism

    Course : Hotel Management

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (1) The student gains academic knowledge and skills required to pursue the full range of career and postsecondary education opportunities within the hotel industry. The student is expected to:
      • (A) organize oral and written information
      • (B) compose a variety of written documents such as agendas, thank you letters, presentations, and advertisements
    • (9) The student uses leadership and teamwork skills in collaborating with others to accomplish organizational goals and objectives. The student is expected to:
      • (A) apply team-building skills
      • (B) apply decision-making and problem-solving skills
      • (C) apply leadership and teamwork qualities in creating a pleasant work atmosphere
    • (12) The student understands the knowledge and skills required for careers in the hotel management industry. The student is expected to:
      • (A) develop job-specific technical vocabulary
      • (B) explain procedures to meet guest needs, including guest registration, rate assignment, room assignment, and determination of payment methods
      • (C) determine the functions of a meeting and event planning
      • (D) evaluate current and emerging technologies to improve guest services
      • (E) understand the importance of check-out procedures to ensure guest satisfaction and verify settlement of account
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • explain procedures to meet guest needs, including:
      • guest registration
      • rate assignment
      • room assignment
      • determination of payment methods
    • understand the importance of check-out procedures to ensure guest satisfaction and verify settlement of account
    • determine the functions of meeting and event planning
    • evaluate current and emerging technologies to improve guest services
  • Rationale

    Script:

    The hospitality industry is all about service to guests. Making sure the guest is satisfied is often the most important aspect of ensuring your guest becomes a repeat customer. Guest services in a hotel are an integral part of hotel management as they are normally the people who deal directly with guests. Making good impressions upon the guest is essential to guest services, happy guests, and repeat business.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Four 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Group: a large sale of rooms or services, sometimes made with special rates, and often sold by sales and/or marketing department and not the front desk

    Room Plan: some hotels will negotiate or offer special rates – this could be for groups, such as AAA or AARP or be based on meal inclusion, such as breakfast or dinner included

    Room Rate: the amount per night that is charged for a room

    Room Type: used to designate different configurations of hotel rooms such as smoking versus non-smoking, single bed (usually a queen or king bed) versus multiple beds (either 2 double or queen beds), or suite versus regular sleeping room

    Transient: a guest that is neither a part of a group booking or a tour group – a guest that is staying as an individual and the room is booked primarily by the front desk or internet

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for PowerPoint™ presentation
    • computers with Internet access (be sure to follow district guidelines for internet access)
    • presenter remote

    Materials:

    If available:

    • blank checks (void check by writing VOID across front)
    • card or list of room types
    • card or list of types of room rates such as group rate, AARP rate or AAA rate
    • credit cards (make sure they are invalid or expired – raised numbers cut and or magnetic strip on back scratched)
    • event or meeting checklists
    • guest registration cards
    • hotel keys

    Supplies:

    • cardstock
    • colored pencils
    • markers
    • paper

    —-

    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)

  • Anticipatory Set

    Display as many materials as you have available in the front of the classroom so that students see them as they enter (see Materials or Specialized Equipment Needed tab).
    —-
    Begin the lesson by asking students the following questions:

    • Did you ever have a moment you wanted to take back and do over?
    • Have you ever met someone for the first time and know that you didn’t make a great impression?
    • Perhaps you met someone and you didn’t look the way you wanted or said something you would have said differently?
    • What do you think would happen if the first contact you had with a hotel went badly?
    • What would happen if the front desk refused to answer a guest’s questions?

    Allow time for discussion.

    Distribute the graphic organizer KWL – First Impressions: Guest Services, (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and have students fill out the first two boxes of the chart. Ask students to write down what they already know about guest services from their personal experiences. The last box will be completed during lesson closure.

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Review lesson objectives, terms, and definitions.

    Distribute Guest Services – First Impressions Notes (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Students will be expected to take notes during the slide presentation.

    Introduce the PowerPoint™ Guest Services – First Impressions (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and begin discussion with students.

    View YouTube™ video:

    • Front Desk First Impressions
      American Hotel and Lodging Educational Institute
      The 25 greatest unprofessional Front Desk sins committed by a hotel Front Desk associate (as compiled from a survey of front office managers). A scenario out of our award winning Front Desk First Impressions video. http://youtu.be/s3aR3yP4aKg

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • highlight materials for emphasis
    • provide students with vocabulary list with definitions prior to lesson
    • work with a peer tutor
    • use study guides
    • provide printed PowerPoint™ Guest Services – First Impressions Presentation Notes for assistance with note-taking

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Discuss in detail the check-in and check-out procedures with the students.

    Ask questions about the right and wrong way to do various tasks such as the right and wrong way to greet guests, to ask for payment, or to end a conversation on a good note. Ask the students for examples and allow them to demonstrate or role play.

    Divide the class into subgroups of three or four.

    Assign roles in each group such as:

    • recorder
    • guest(s)
    • front desk agent

    Assign half of the groups as check-in and the other half as check-out. Ask each group to write two scripts about either a check-in or check-out scenario (as assigned). One script will be the wrong way and the second script will be the right way to either check-in or check-out.

    Tell the students to have fun with the wrong way script and this becomes a fun exercise with the students, giving them a little freedom to act silly. They should be more serious with the second or right way script to demonstrate their knowledge of the correct procedures to check-in or check-out guests. You should act as the front desk agent and demonstrate the correct way to check-in or check-out a guest. Be sure to walk around and assist student groups as needed.

    At your discretion, you can add obstacles with some groups especially if you have gifted or advanced students.

    Examples of check-in obstacles are:

    • the credit card is declined
    • the guest brings an animal and the hotel requires additional fee for animals

    Examples of check-out obstacles are:

    • housekeeping has reported that a hotel robe is missing
    • there is damage to the guest’s room such as a hole in the wall (made by the guest)

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • encourage participation in group discussion
    • check for understanding

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Divide the class into subgroups of four or five students.

    Note: Print one copy of Events and Meetings (see All Lesson Attachments tab) on cardstock and separate events and meetings and place in a basket. One student from each group will draw a card to plan the event or meeting. Blank cards have been provided to add other events or meetings.

    Announce to the class that they will be planning an event or a meeting for a certain number of people. They will need to provide a list of details that need to be addressed in order for the event or meeting to run smoothly. Lots of planning and preparation takes place before an event or meeting so they will have an opportunity to brainstorm the details.

    Distribute Event or Meeting Planner Checklist (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Students will plan a checklist of details to do for an event or meeting. They need to keep in mind the number of people at each event or meeting.

    Items to remember (not all items may need to be used):
    • Date
    • Decorations
    • Food
    • Hotel
    • Music
    • Room arrangements
    • Special needs accommodations
    • Technology needs
    • Transportation
    • Venue

    Each group should have a minimum of 15 items on their checklist. If they have trouble, they may use the internet for research. When complete, you may choose to have each group present their list to the class.

    Remind students of details they may have forgotten.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • work with a peer tutor
    • praise participation in group assignment

  • Lesson Closure

    Review lesson objectives, terms, and definitions.

    Have students complete the last column on their KWL Chart – Guest Services (see All Lesson Attachments tab).

    Review and answer questions in class.

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Students will be assessed with Guest Services – First Impressions Quiz (see All Lesson Attachments tab).

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • shorten quiz
    • allow use of notes

  • References/Resources

    Textbooks:

    • Reynolds, Johnny Sue, Hospitality Services Food & Lodging, Second Edition, Tinley Park, Illinois: The Goodheart-Willcox Company, Inc., 2010. Print.
    • Hayes, David K., Ninemeier, Jack D., Hotel Operations Management, Second Edition, Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson Education, Inc., 2007. Print.

    Websites:

    YouTube™:

    • Front Desk First Impressions
      American Hotel and Lodging Educational Institute
      The 25 greatest unprofessional Front Desk sins committed by a hotel Front Desk associate (as compiled from a survey of front office managers). A scenario out of our award winning Front Desk First Impressions video. http://youtu.be/s3aR3yP4aKg
  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • use “word wall” for vocabulary words
    • work with a peer tutor
    • peer to read materials
    • highlighted materials for emphasis
    • shortened simplified instructions
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Recommended Strategies

    Reading Strategies

    Encourage students to read more about hotels and guest services.

    • Hotel Business Trade Magazine
      Allow students to research and identify examples of various technology. Use the pre-reading strategy prediction.
      http://subscribe.hotelbusiness.com (free subscription)
    • Hotel Business
      The vertical portal bringing you late breaking news and analysis in a real time format – personalized by you to guarantee you get only the news and information you want when you want it.
      http://hotelbusiness.com/hb/main.asp

    Encourage students to connect reading and their life experiences or prior knowledge.

  • Quotes

    Good actions give strength to ourselves and inspire good actions in others.
    - Plato

    Creative thinking inspires ideas. Ideas inspire change.
    - Barbara Januszkiewicz

    In order to succeed, your desire for success should be greater than your fear of failure.
    - Bill Cosby

    Good leadership consists of showing average people how to do the work of superior people.
    - John D. Rockefeller

  • Multimedia/Visual Strategies

    PowerPoint™:

    • Guest Services – First Impressions
    • Presentation Notes – Guest Services: First Impression

    Technology:

    Files for downloading:

  • Graphic Organizers/Handout

    Graphic Organizers:

    • Guest Services – First Impressions Notes
    • Guest Services – First Impressions Notes (Key)
    • KWL Chart – Guest Services

    Handouts:

    • Event or Meeting Planner Checklist
    • Events and Meetings
    • Guest Services – First Impressions Quiz
    • Guest Services – First Impressions Quiz (Key)

    Files for downloading:

  • Writing Strategies

    Journal Entries:

    • The easist way to satisfy a guest is by …
    • The best way to accomodate a blind person is by …
    • When a guest can’t pay for the room, the best thing to do is …
    • When a guest’s credit card is not valid, the best thing to do is …

    Writing Strategy:

    RAFT (Role/Audience/Format/Topic) writing strategy:

    • Role: general manager or front office manager in a local hotel
    • Audience: a recent guest that you know was very satisfied
    • Format: letter
    • Topic: as the manager, you are writing to thank them for their recent visit and to ask if they would write a favorable recommendation to publish on your website

  • Communication 90 Second Speech Topics

    • Guest services is important in these 3 ways…
    • Examples of how to make a good impression on guests are…
    • The best way to handle an angry guest is by…
  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    Have students contact a professional event or meeting planner and interview them regarding their career, how they got started in the field, and what kind of training and education they would recommend if someone were interested in the field.

  • Family/Community Connection

    Invite a front desk manager to speak to the class on the importance and impact of guest service skills and the impact of first impressions and the importance they play in satisfied guests.

  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career, Community Leaders of America

    (FCCLA)
    http://www.texasfccla.org

    • STAR Events:
      Hospitality, Tourism and Recreation is an individual or team event that recognizes participants who demonstrate their knowledge of the hospitality, tourism, and recreation industries and ability to translate their knowledge into a hypothetical or real business.

    Lesson is preparation for Hospitality LEO test (Leadership Enhancement Opportunities). Objective tests are given to FCCLA members at fall leadership training, regional FCCLA meeting, and at the state FCCLA meeting.

  • Service Learning Projects

    True service learning is developed with student voice about concerns and needs. As the students are learning and researching this topic, ask them to think about ways they can maximize their learning to benefit others.
    Ask students how they will use what they have learned about marketing and communications.

    Use the LEADERS Model from http://www.servicelearning.org. Brainstorm with your students for a service project pertaining to this lesson.

    Example: Take the lessons learned about the importance of guest services and making good impressions and volunteer at a local retirement center or assisted living center.

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