Global Cultures and International Cuisines

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Hospitality and Tourism

    Course : Culinary Arts

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (2) The student integrates listening, writing and speaking skills using verbal and nonverbal communication to enhance operations, guest satisfaction and professional development. The student is expected to:
      • (A) create formal or informal presentations
    • (6) The student understands the history of food service and the use of the professional kitchen. The student is expected to:
      • (B) identify global cultures and traditions related to food
    • (8) The student demonstrates leadership, citizenship and teamwork skills required for success. The student is expected to:
      • (D) participate in community leadership and teamwork opportunities to enhance professional skills
    • (11) The student demonstrates the knowledge and skills required for careers in the restaurant, food, and beverage industry. The student is expected to:
      • (F) analyze international cuisines
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • analyze differing global cuisines
    • recognize distinguishing characteristics of global cuisines
    • observe traditions related to food from global cultures and cuisines
    • consider global cuisine and the future of international cuisines
  • Rationale

    One of the most endearing parts of the Culinary Arts course is a notion that food is worth a lot more than what you pay for it. For many cultures, food is not only a way of life, but a component of life interwoven into life’s biggest and most memorable moments. This lesson will help you to see the connection between food and life in many cultures and explore that connection.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Four 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Cuisine: Foods and methods of preparation traditional to a region or population

    Culture: Behaviors and beliefs characteristic of a particular social, ethnic or age group

    Ethnicity: The fact or state of belonging to a social group that has a common national or cultural tradition

    Gourmet: Food involving high-quality ingredients and skilled preparation

    Traditional Foods: A significant element of cultural heritage; production and sale are critical economic inputs to many regions

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for PowerPoint™ presentation
    • computers with Internet access (be sure to follow district guidelines)

    Materials:

    • cardstock
    • family recipes
    • food service cookbooks
    • highlighters
    • recipes from culinary arts textbooks

    Supplies:

    • for optional activity in the Indepent Practice/Laboratory Experience section:
      • groceries
        • will be determined based upon choices made by students and instructor during the course of the lesson
      • kitchen equipment as needed
        • will be determined based upon choices made by students and instructor during the course of the lesson and also based upon availability of such equipment

    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)

  • Anticipatory Set

    Before class begins:

    This is a very powerful lesson that can not only teach your students about international foods but can also allow your students to share their passions about the foods that they know best. This will, in turn, help you get to know and learn about your students.

    Gather several recipes from differing cuisines and cultures. White-out or cut off the titles of each recipe and have a few for viewing at each table. Have the students look them over as a warm up exercise.

    After the students have time to study the recipes, ask students what cuisine or culture their dish originated from or is known for.

    As students begin to answer, ask the following questions:

    • How did you choose the cuisine you felt the dish was a part of?
    • Were there any ingredients listed that made you choose that way?
    • Were there any cooking methods that made you choose that way?
    • Was there any particular equipment mentioned that led you to their decision?
    • What is the name of the dish that you are holding?
    • What are dishes similar to the recipe you have just read?

    Discuss answers with students.

    This activity will allow you to present the lesson’s concepts to your students.

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Distribute graphic organizer Global Cultures and International Cuisines Notes (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that students may take notes during slide presentation.

    Introduce PowerPoint™ Global Cultures and International Cuisines – Culinary Arts (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and lead a discussion about ethnic foods.

    View YouTube™ videos:

    • Our Global Kitchen: Food, Nature, Culture
      American Museum of Natural History
      In the new exhibition Our Global Kitchen: Food, Nature, Culture, the American Museum of Natural History explores the complex and intricate food system that brings what we eat from farm to fork.
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a1dQlyNVpTI

    • Global Palates: Ethnic Cuisines and Flavors in America
      The National Restaurant Association set out to explore how familiar Americans are with various cuisines and items, where they typically eat them, and how they feel about those choices.
      https://youtu.be/0sQY7ODS-Xs

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • check for understanding
    • copy of slide presentation provided

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Note to teacher:
    This section has several activities that may be used in this lesson. You may choose to do all of the activities with your students or choose an activity or activities that will work best in your class.

    Distribute handout Global Grocery Worksheet (see All Lesson Attachments tab).

    Access the website below from the American Museum of Natural History and view on a projector.

    Allow students to complete the worksheet as you scroll over the different food items.

    Students may complete this assignment on their own if they have access to computers.

    View the YouTube™ video:

    • Andrew Zimmern Explains Why World Cuisine Is So Similar
      Co-creator and host of Bizarre Foods and Bizarre Foods America talks about why food is so similar all around the world.
      http://youtu.be/97w3wH1bA-s

    Distribute the graphic organizer Same Dish, Different Name (see All Lesson Attachments tab).

    Have students identify dishes utilizing common and familiar ingredients across cultures. Examples are provided.

    Discuss their findings in class.

    Option:
    Building on the Same Dish, Different Name activity, divide class into subgroups of two or three students.

    Allow students to use the Internet or cookbooks available to locate five recipes from an assigned cuisine to help them discover the similarities in the different cuisines, utilizing the one common ingredient such as rice, bread, pasta, potatoes and so forth.

    Suggested websites:

    Students may present their recipes using PowerPoint™, Microsoft Word™ or a Prezi™.

    Lead a discussion about the recipes on the:

    • similarities and differences in the dishes
    • part of the recipe that makes it characteristic of the cuisine
    • how the ingredient is used in the recipe

    Access the website below and view on a projector:

    Take the quiz as a class to help students see the connection between food and family.

    If you choose to extend this activity past taking the quiz as a class, you could ask for food centered traditions from the students to see their experiences and family traditions.

    Discuss the quiz results and answers.

    These activities give your students an opportunity to practice and apply the skills you taught them during direct instruction.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • peer tutor
    • monitor progress

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Note: Print the International Cuisines (see All Lesson Attachments) on cardstock, separate and place in a basket before class begins. Blank cards are provided to include other cuisines not listed.

    Divide the class into subgroups of two or three students.

    Students will work with partners to research cuisines:

    • Region of the world in which the cuisine originated
    • Traditions related to food
    • Most popular dish
    • Cooking equipment unique to the cuisine
    • Dining traditions for that cuisine
    • Map and/or general information on your assigned cuisine
    • Availability of ingredients
    • Foods typical of the associated region’s agriculture and horticulture

    Distribute Rubric for Visual Display or GlogsterEDU™ (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and review so students know what is expected.

    Option:
    Utilizing the graphic organizer Same Dish, Different Names (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and the five different recipes, expand on the assignment by allowing the students to make a dish of their choosing from a recipe they researched.

    By having a common ingredient across all of your students and across the dishes researched in the above assignment, the dishes created in this assignment can be executed at a relatively low cost because most recipes will have shared ingredients.

    This lesson can be expanded into a cross-curricular activity or even a schoolwide activity by creating a celebration of the community’s various cultural groups and foods.

    Invite parents and family members to the event to share the foods from their cultures and to talk about their own histories and food stories.

    You can extend this project even further with the creation of a multi-cultural cookbook project for your students.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • extra time for assignments
    • reduce assignment

  • Lesson Closure

    Review terms, definitions and objectives.

    Close the lesson by debriefing – a form of reflection immediately following an activity or at the end of class.

    Debrief with your students by asking the following questions and allowing them time to answer:

    Classroom discussion questions to close:

    • What is the difference between culture and cuisine?
    • Why has food become such an integral part of your family’s lives?
    • What obstacles do food centered traditions face in order to continue to be passed along?
    • What cuisines seem to have the richest food centered traditions and why?
    • Have any food cultures found their way into the “mainstream”?
    • What is the value of this lesson? Why is it important to know more about various cuisines and cultures?

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Students will present their assigned cuisine and their work done on their cuisine poster.

    Assess student presentations with appropriate rubric.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • encourage participation
    • give much encouragement and praise

  • References/Resources

    Textbook:

    • Culinary essentials. (2010). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw Hill.
    • Foundations of restaurant management & culinary arts: Level one. (2011) Boston, MA: Prentice Hill.

    Websites:

    YouTube™:

    • Andrew Zimmern Explains Why World Cuisine Is So Similar
      Co-creator and host of Bizarre Foods and Bizarre Foods America talks about why food is so similar all around the world.
      http://youtu.be/97w3wH1bA-s
    • Global Palates: Ethnic Cuisines and Flavors in America
      The National Restaurant Association set out to explore how familiar Americans are with various cuisines and items, where they typically eat them, and how they feel about those choices.
      https://youtu.be/0sQY7ODS-Xs
    • Our Global Kitchen: Food, Nature, Culture
      American Museum of Natural History
      In the new exhibition Our Global Kitchen: Food, Nature, Culture, the American Museum of Natural History explores the complex and intricate food system that brings what we eat from farm to fork.
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a1dQlyNVpTI
  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Recommended Strategies

    Reading Strategies

    Other articles pertaining to this lesson students may read include:

    • 6 Factors That Influence Our Food Choices
      As the old adage goes, you are what you eat. This is especially true when it comes to the food choices people make, which are influenced by a wide variety of internal and external factors that may actually have little to do with the food itself.
      http://www.ehow.com/info_10017422_6-factors-influence-food-choices.html

    Reading strategy:
    Encourage students to “visualize” as they read. Many students are visual learners and will benefit from making sketches or diagrams on scrap paper as they read. Providing students with graphic organizers to help them organize their thoughts is also helpful.

  • Quotes

    Food is a central activity of mankind and one of the single most significant trademarks of a culture.
    -Mark Kurlansky ‘Choice Cuts’ (2002)

    When I walk into my kitchen today, I am not alone. Whether we know it or not, none of us is. We bring fathers and mothers and kitchen tables, and every meal we have ever eaten. Food is never just food. It’s also a way of getting at something else: who we are, who we have been, and who we want to be.
    -Molly Wizenberg

    Rice is not simply rice, it is life itself.
    -Nichiren 13th-century Buddhist leader-philosopher

    Food brings people together on many different levels. It’s nourishment of the soul and body; it’s truly love.
    -Giada DeLaurenitis

  • Multimedia/Visual Strategies

    PowerPoint™:

    • Global Cultures and International Cuisines
    • Presentation Notes – Global Cultures and International Cuisines

    Technology:

    • TEDx Talk:
      • Food is not only culture, it’s Diplomacy: Leah Selim
        Leah Selim is a co-founder of Global Kitchen, a social enterprise that hosts immigrant-led cooking classes to promote cultural exchange and awareness through food. In her recent TEDx talk, she discussed how food, identity, environment and politics intersect – contributing to a larger concept known as “gastrodiplomacy”. It is through the communal act of sharing food that ideas can be exchanged freely, an essential first step in growing a community.
        http://tedxgowanus.com/talks/

    Files for downloading:

  • Graphic Organizers/Handout

    Graphic Organizers:

    • Global Cultures and International Cuisines Notes
    • Global Cultures and International Cuisines Notes (Key)
    • Same Dish, Different Name

    Handouts:

    • Global Grocery Worksheet
    • Global Grocery Worksheet (Key)
    • International Cuisines Flashcards
    • Rubric for Visual Display or Glogster EDU

    Files for downloading:

  • Writing Strategies

    Journal Entries:

    • What types of food does your family usually make to celebrate special occasions?
    • I think food brings people together because… OR I do not think food brings people together because…
    • Do you usually try new foods? Why/why not?
    • Foods that my family makes from scratch are…
    • My favorite international cuisine is…

    Writing Strategies:

    • RAFT writing strategy is designed to demonstrate student understanding of material in a creative and relevant way.
      • Role – Restaurant Owner
      • Audience – Potential Customers
      • Format – Flyer
      • Topic – Attracting customers to your restaurant by advertising POPULAR CULTURAL FAVORITES (to match your cuisine)
  • Communication 90 Second Speech Topics

    • The difference between cuisine and culture is…
    • How does culture help shape cuisine?
    • Three things I learned about international cuisine are…
  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    Rewrite family recipes (refer to writing strategy) and create a cookbook that can be passed on to families.

    Students can seek and obtain a working chef to serve as an expert in their field to do a volunteer demonstration for the class/program. This would serve as an excellent lesson in professional communication and networking as well.

    Infographics:

    Infographics are graphic visual representations of information, data or knowledge intended to present complex information quickly and clearly.

    The infographic below is related to this lesson. Allow students to view the image on a projector and lead a discussion concerning the information provided.

    TEDx Talk:

    TED is a nonprofit organization devoted to spreading ideas, usually in the form of short, powerful talks (18 minutes or less). The video below is related to this lesson. Allow students to view the video and lead a discussion concerning the TEDx Talk.

    • Food is not only culture, it’s Diplomacy: Leah Selim
      Leah Selim is a co-founder of Global Kitchen, a social enterprise that hosts immigrant-led cooking classes to promote cultural exchange and awareness through food. In her recent TEDx talk, she discussed how food, identity, environment and politics intersect – contributing to a larger concept known as “gastrodiplomacy”. It is through the communal act of sharing food that ideas can be exchanged freely, an essential first step in growing a community.
      http://tedxgowanus.com/talks/
  • Family/Community Connection

    Students may bring in a family cookbook or recipe for discussion with the class.

    Students may help cook at home the next time the family prepares a meal and allow them to discuss with the class what they did to help and what they observed/learned.

    Interview a family member that makes a traditional recipe from memory and get very specific verbal details on how to make the dish while taking notes.

    Create a standardized recipe using the handout Parts of a Recipe from the lesson Recipe for Success: Breaking Down a Recipe.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/recipe-for-success-breaking-down-a-recipe/

    Students may share their family recipe with the class.

  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career, and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)

    http://www.texasfccla.org

    • Culinary Arts
      A team event – recognizes participants enrolled in occupational culinary arts/food service training programs for their ability to work as members of a team to produce a quality meal using industrial culinary arts/food service techniques and equipment.
  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to lesson. For additional information on service learning see
    http://www.ysa.org

    Example:
    Volunteer at the local homeless shelter to prepare meals, cater a luncheon or rewrite recipes.

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