Famous Chefs and Entrepreneurs in the Food Service Industry (revised)

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Hospitality and Tourism

    Course : Culinary Arts

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (2) The student integrates listening, writing and speaking skills using verbal and nonverbal communication to enhance operations, guest satisfaction and professional development. The student is expected to:
      • (A) create formal or informal presentations
    • (6) The student understands the history of food service and the use of the professional kitchen. The student is expected to:
      • (A) research famous chefs from history and note their major accomplishments
      • (C) summarize historical entrepreneurs who influenced food service in the United States
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • explore the history of food service and the use of a professional kitchen – Julia Child’s interactive kitchen at the Smithsonian Institute
    • identify the kitchen brigade system
    • research famous chefs and entrepreneurs in the food service industry and note their accomplishments
    • produce a multimedia presentation noting historical chefs and entrepreneur’s major accomplishments
  • Rationale

    Script:

    (revised 05/06/2015) Our interest in food, pastry and culinary arts has expanded. Proof of this is the number of new cable/television networks devoted to the topic such as the Food Network, Cooking Channel, History Channel and more. Where did it all begin? We will explore famous chefs and entrepreneurs in the food industry to help us answer that question.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Five 45 minutes class periods

  • Word Wall

    Apprentice: One who works under the guidance of a skilled worker to learn a particular trade or art

    Bon apetit: French term used as a salutation to a person about to eat

    Chef: A highly skilled professional who is proficient in all aspects of food preparation

    Cuisine: The French word for “kitchen” but in English means a style of cooking

    Entrepreneur: A self-motivated person who creates and runs a business

    Kitchen Brigade: A large kitchen staff that uses a chain of command to complete a task

    Internship: A program in which an advanced student works at a business to get hands-on training

    Professionalism: The positive behaviors and appearance exhibited by an individual who is a professional rather than an amateur

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for multimedia presentation
    • computer lab with Internet (be sure to follow school district guidelines)
    • headphones

    Materials:

    • cardstock
    • clear sheet protectors (optional)
    • images of famous chefs and entrepreneurs (optional)
    • scotch tape
    • zip-lock bags

    Supplies:

    • blender
    • chef coat
    • cookbooks
    • food processor
    • mixer
    • rolling pin
    • skillets
    • wire whisk
    • utensils (various)

    • copies of handouts (See All Lesson Attachments tab)

  • Anticipatory Set

    Before class begins:

    Print and cut apart the Teacher Resource Kitchen Brigade Matching Activity (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Prepare a set for each group and place cards in a zip-lock bag. This activity will be used in the Guided Practice section.

    Become familiar with the interactive website from the Smithsonian:

    • Julia Child’s Kitchen at the Smithsonian
      Julia Child shared the passions, philosophies and products of this kitchen with her family, friends, colleagues and fans for 45 years. Now she is sharing the kitchen itself with millions, having donated it to the National Museum of American History in 2001.
      http://americanhistory.si.edu/juliachild/flash_home.asp?dest=home


    Print the teacher resource Famous Chefs and Entrepreneurs (see All Lesson Attachments tab) on cardstock and cut apart the cards. Tape the cards around the room so that students may view them as they enter the classroom.

    These cards will also be used in the Independent Practice section. Extra cards are available to include other chefs and entrepreneurs of your choice.

    Option – print images of famous chefs and entrepreneurs and place in clear sheet protectors and place around the classroom.

    Display as many items from the Materials or Specialized Equipment Needed tab as you have available on a table in front of the room so that students may view as they enter.

    When class begins, ask the following questions:

    • Do you recognize these names?
    • What do you know about them?
    • Where have you seen them?
    • Why are they famous?

    Lead a class discussion about the various chefs and entrepreneurs.

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce objectives, terms and definitions.

    Select and distribute a handout or graphic organizer from the Instructional Strategies drop down menu in Classroom Essentials or instruct students to take notes in their journal books or on their own paper.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/Sandwich-Chart.pdf
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/Ladder-of-Information1.pdf

    Introduce the PowerPoint™ Famous Chefs and Entrepreneurs in the Food Industry (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Students will be expected to take notes while viewing the slide presentation. Allow time for classroom discussion.

    Distribute the graphic organizer Culinary Kitchen Brigade (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Instruct students to complete the organizer with the English term of each French term.

    View YouTube™ video:

    • Cooking with Julia Child
      Through her television shows, Julia Child shared her love for culinary arts with the world.
      https://youtu.be/rwiv30rV4LU

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • check for understanding
    • repeated review

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Divide the class into subgroups of four students.

    Place the zip-lock bag of the Kitchen Brigade Matching Activity (see All Lesson Attachments tab) on each table. Instruct students to match the French titles of the kitchen brigade to the English titles and the work responsibilities for each.

    Follow up with a review of each position.

    Instruct students to log onto the Smithsonian Institute at the National Museum of America History website so that may be able to interact with Julia Child’s Kitchen.

    Guide the students to the first two sections of the website. Students will complete the last section independently.

    Emphasize the need to read and follow slowly through each section as they are actual recordings of Julia Child.

    Distribute the graphic organizer Julia Child’s Kitchen at the Smithsonian Storyline (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and instruct students to complete the storyline for each section from the Sample Stories.

    If computers are not available, this organizer can be completed as a class connecting a computer to a projector.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • providing a text only version of the website
    • technology assistance
    • shortened assignment

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Place the Chefs and Entrepreneurs cards (see All Lesson Attachments tab) in a basket and ask each student to select a card.

    Read the following scenario:

    You are employed at a food channel network writing for their website and have been assigned the task of researching the origins of famous chefs and entrepreneurs to be displayed on the website. How will you design an informative presentation of the selected chef or entrepreneur?

    Distribute the handout Chefs and Entrepreneurs Research (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and instruct the students gather to facts and information for selected chef or entrepreneur.

    The following criteria should be included:

    1. Background (birthplace, birth date, family)
    2. Education (high school and college or culinary school)
    3. Internships (worked with ?)
    4. Employment (names of restaurants)
    5. Books published (cookbooks, biography)
    6. Restaurants owned
    7. Awards for accomplishments
    8. Recognitions

    Inform the students that not all of the information will be found for each person but students are to gather as many facts as possible.

    Instruct students to use any technology program to design their project such as:

    • infographics
    • slide presentations
    • virtual poster boards

    Free multimedia programs are available at:

    Distribute the Rubric for Chefs or Entrepreneurs Presentation (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that students understand how their project will be assessed.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • peer tutoring
    • technology assistance
    • shortened assignment

  • Lesson Closure

    Review objectives, terms and definitions.

    Distribute one card of the Kitchen Brigade Matching Activity (see All Lesson Activities tab) to each student and instruct them to find the student with the matching cards.

    Once the students find the matching english and french term with the responsibilities, they may tape the cards to a bulletin board for review.

    Follow-up with questions at the end of each class period to include answer and discussion:

    • What made Julia Child so special in the kitchen?
    • Why is the brigade system so important in the kitchen?
    • What is your favorite restaurant and how did it get started?
    • Why is the Food Network so popular?
    • What is your favorite food show and why?

    If time permits, view snippets of Julia Child’s PBS videos and compare them to shows on TV today.

    • PBS – Watch the Julia Child Video Collection
      Welcome to the Julia Child video collection, featuring the best of the first lady of cooking, from early episodes of The French Chef to the beloved Baking with Julia series to the incomparable live shows with Jacques Pepin. Watch rare interviews, behind-the-scenes clips, and even Dan Akroyd’s portrayal on Saturday Night Live.
      http://www.pbs.org/food/julia-child/julia-child-video-collection/

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Students will be assessed with appropriate rubric.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • oral assistance with presentation
    • peer assistance

  • References/Resources

    Images:

    • Shutterstock™ images. Photos obtained with subscription.

    Textbooks:

    • Culinary essentials. (2010). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
    • Foundations of restaurant management & culinary arts. (2011) Boston, MA: Prentice Hall.
    • Draz, J., & Koetke, C. (2014). The culinary professional. Tinley Park, Illinois: The Goodheart-Willcox Company.

    Website:

    • Chef Jobs, Training, and Career Paths
      The contemporary kitchen, from institutional to fine-dining restaurant, runs according to a strict hierarchy in which the chef plays the lead role. Assignments differ based on the precise needs of a given kitchen, but in most upscale American and European facilities the nomenclature and roles are determined by the Brigade System.
      http://www.culinaryschools.org/chef-types/
    • Julia Child’s Kitchen at the Smithsonian
      Julia Child shared the passions, philosophies, and products of this kitchen in her home with family, friends, colleagues, and fans for 45 years. Now she is sharing the kitchen itself with millions, having donated it to the National Museum of American History in 2001.
      http://americanhistory.si.edu/juliachild/

    YouTube™:

    • Cooking with Julia Child
      Through her television shows, Julia Child shared her love for culinary arts with the world.
      https://youtu.be/rwiv30rV4LU
  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • word wall
    • provide visuals
    • allow extra processing time
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Recommended Strategies

    Reading Strategies

    Students may read books by Julia Child and compare some of the french recipes to today’s recipes.

    Books by Julia Child:

    • Mastering the Art of French Cooking (with Simone Beck and Louisette Bertholle). New York: Knopf, 1961; The 40th Anniversary Edition of Mastering. Knopf, 2001

    • The French Chef Cookbook. New York: Knopf, 1968; The 30th Anniversary Edition of the French Chef. New York: Ballentine Books, 1998.

    Reading Strategy
    Have students form their own questions about the text prior to reading or have them write down any questions that come to mind as they are reading.

  • Quotes

    I was 32 when I started cooking; up until then, I just ate.
    - Julia Child

    The only time to eat diet food is while you’re waiting for the steak to cook.
    - Julia Child

    Food is our common ground, a universal experience.
    - James Beard

    Food trucks give creative entrepreneurs the ability to cook with freedom and make what they love, meaning that they can create highly specialized meals without having the high overhead costs of running a restaurant.
    -Homaro Cantu

    I have had some great successes and great failures. I think every entrepreneur has. I try to learn from all of them.
    -Kevin O’Leary

  • Multimedia/Visual Strategies

    PowerPoint™:

    • Famous Chefs and Entrepreneurs in the Food Service Industry
    • Presentation Notes – Famous Chefs and Entrepreneurs in the Food Service Industry

    Technology:

    • TED Talks:
      • Myths Of Entrepreneurship: Tim Folta at TEDxPurdueU
        Entrepreneurs play a vital role in the success of business and technological innovations, but some impediments do limit their full potential. Dr. Timothy Folta explains how we can redefine the term “entrepreneurship” to overcome those hurdles and attract the best and brightest individuals to become entrepreneurs and ensure a brighter future for all of us.
        http://tedxtalks.ted.com/video/Myths-Of-Entrepreneurship-Tim-F

    Files for downloading:

  • Graphic Organizers/Handout

    Graphic Organizer:

    • Culinary Kitchen Brigade
    • Culinary Kitchen Brigade (Key)
    • Julia Child’s Kitchen at the Smithsonian Storyline
    • Julia Child’s Kitchen at the Smithsonian Storyline (Key)

    Handouts:

    • Chefs and Entrepreneurs Research
    • Rubric for Chefs and Entrepreneurs Presentation

    Teacher Resource:

    • Chefs and Entrepreneurs
    • Kitchen Brigade Matching Activity

    Files for downloading:

  • Writing Strategies

    Journal Entries:

    • My business plan would be to ……
    • My culinary show on T.V would be about …….
    • I would like to apprentice with ………
    • Current trends in the food industry are……

    Writing Strategies:

    • RAFT Writing strategy
      • Role – high school student
      • Audience – owner of restaurant, grill or bakery
      • Format – letter
      • Topic -seeking employment after taking culinary courses in high school

    Write a letter to a business owner about seeking employment.

  • Communication 90 Second Speech Topics

    • One of Julia Child’s most famous cooking shows was about ……..
    • My description of a business I would like to own would be ……
    • Auguste Escoffier restructured the kitchen and introduced the brigade system. The job titles and their duties are ……..
  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    Encourage students to include their presentation on the school district website to bring more awareness to the culinary program.

    Students may also take their presentation to the middle school and present it to the career portals class.

    Infographic:

    Infographics are graphic visual representations of information, data or knowledge intended to present complex information quickly and clearly.

    The infographic below is related to this lesson. Allow students to view the image on a projector and lead a discussion concerning the information provided.

    TED Talk:

    TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event.

    The video below is related to this lesson. Allow students to view the video and lead a discussion concerning the TED Talk.

    • Myths Of Entrepreneurship: Tim Folta at TEDxPurdueU
      Entrepreneurs play a vital role in the success of business and technological innovations, but some impediments do limit their full potential. Dr. Timothy Folta explains how we can redefine the term “entrepreneurship” to overcome those hurdles and attract the best and brightest individuals to become entrepreneurs and ensure a brighter future for all of us.
      http://tedxtalks.ted.com/video/Myths-Of-Entrepreneurship-Tim-F
  • Family/Community Connection

    Invite the owner of a local restaurant to speak to the class about his/her business. Discuss the pros and cons of owning your own business.

  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career, and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)

    http://www.texasfccla.org

    • Entrepreneurship
      An individual or team event – recognizes participants who develop a plan for a small business using Family and Consumer Sciences skills and sound business practices. The business must relate to an area of Family and Consumer Sciences education or related occupations.
  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to this lesson.
    www.ysa.org

    Possible ideas:
    Students may volunteer in the school library assisting the librarian with technology skills in an after school program.