Families Across the Lifespan

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Human Services

    Course : Interpersonal Studies

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (8) The student determines how changes occurring throughout the family life cycle impact individuals and families. The student is expected to:
      • (A) describe the stages of the family life cycle
      • (B) examine roles and responsibilities of individuals and family members throughout the family life cycle
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • understand the stages of the family life cycle
    • determine roles and responsibilities of family members
  • Rationale

    Script:

    The family is considered the basic unit in our society. Families take on many forms and shapes, and yet they perform some of the same basic functions from culture to culture. Each individual in the family has certain roles which are defined by age and responsibilities. The family life cycle evolves when individuals pass through developmental stages as their lives move from birth to death. As an individual pursuing a career related to counseling and mental health services, it is important to understand how the relationships between individuals and among family members significantly affects the quality of life.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Two 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Family: A group of two or more people, related by blood, marriage or adoption, who reside together

    Launch: To give (a person) a start

    Lifespan: The longest period over which the life of any organism or species may extend, according to the available biological knowledge concerning it

    Lifespan development: The challenges and changes which occur with each stage throughout the human lifespan

    Relationship: The way in which two or more concepts, objects or people are connected, or the state of being connected

    Responsibilities: Duties or tasks that you are required or expected to do

    Roles: Individuals within a family unit each have responsibilities or “roles” they perform; a socially accepted behavior pattern

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for PowerPoint™ presentation
    • computers with Internet access (be sure to follow district guidelines)

    Materials:

    • baby doll
    • bag of groceries
    • brochure from an assisted living facility
    • briefcase
    • calendar
    • cell phone
    • college catalog
    • day care pamphlets
    • diaper bag filled with baby necessities
    • high school textbook
    • laptop
    • nursing home information
    • play money
    • real estate magazine
    • retirement information
    • stack of bills
    • wedding magazine

    Supplies:

    • cardstock
    • glue
    • scissors

    Other appropriate lessons:

    Building Healthy Lifelong Relationships
    Interpersonal Studies
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/building-healthy-lifelong-relationships

    Crisis and the Family
    Interpersonal Studies
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/crisis-and-the-family

    Say What? The Communication Process
    Interpersonal Studies
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/say-what-the-communication-process

    Today’s Families
    Principles of Human Services
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/todays-families

    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Anticipatory Set

    Prior to class:

    Become familiar with the PowerPoint™, handouts and activities.

    Display as many of the lesson-related supplies (see Materials or Specialized Equipment Needed) as you have available on a table in front of the room.

    Before class begins:

    Script:

    We all have various roles in our family.

    • Who budgets the money in your family?
    • Who cooks the majority of the meals?
    • Who repairs the cars or small household appliances?

    Students will think about the roles in their families and which family member fulfills each role.

    Select a scribe for the following activity.

    Inform students, that as a class, they will develop a comprehensive list displaying roles that members have in their families. Have the students brainstorm all the roles of members in their families while the scribe writes down their responses on a chalk board, white board, poster board or butcher paper. Instruct the scribe to place check marks next to roles that are repeated.

    Distribute the handout Roles in My Family (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Individually, students will complete the handout. They will use the comprehensive list to complete the handout. Students may volunteer to share the results of their handouts.

    Possible questions for discussion:

    • What might happen in a family if members do not fulfill their expected roles?
    • Why is it important that all family members know the expectations for their roles? Who determines the expectations?
    • Do the expected roles change? How and when?
  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Note to teacher: Prior to beginning this lesson, please review, preview and select the appropriate multimedia for your classes.

    Introduce lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Distribute the Slide Presentation Notes (see All Lessons Attachment tab) handout. Students will be expected to take notes while viewing the slide presentation. Teacher will determine the notes to be recorded by students.

    Introduce the PowerPoint™ Families Across the Lifespan (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Allow for questions and classroom discussion.

    Use the appropriate notes from Presentation Notes for Families Across the Lifespan (see All Lesson Attachments tab) for discussion.

    Video included in the slide presentation:

    • Laura Kastner: Extreme Emotions
      Dr. Kastner discuss extreme emotions in extreme thoughts and avoiding the negativity track again.
      https://youtu.be/eCskmRQA-xY

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • providing students with a copy of the notes or a fill-in-the-blank note sheet to follow along with instruction
    • pairing up students with partners who can assist them with verbal and written responses to the lesson

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    For homework, distribute the Family Lifespan Interview (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout. Students will interview four individuals or household members. They will identify roles and responsibilities of individuals and family members throughout the family life cycle and complete the chart with the appropriate information. Keep in mind the sensitivity of your student’s family units. Some students may need to interview a co-worker, teacher or neighbor.

    For clarification, model the interview process with the students’ responses. Instruct the students to complete the first line of the chart with their own information.

    Inform the students they will be using the information from this Family Lifespan Interview to create a storyboard during Independent Practice.

    Check for understanding.

    Distribute the Family Lifespan Scenarios (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout. Students will match the scenarios with the appropriate family life cycle stages. (Key) Family Lifespan Scenarios (see All Lesson Attachments tab) has been provided for you to check students’ answers. Allow for questions and class discussion.

    Completion of Family Lifespan Interview and Family Lifespan Scenarios can be assessed as daily grades.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • allowing extra time for assignments
    • providing positive feedback
    • providing copies of the slide presentation

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Scenario: You have recently been thinking about a career as a marriage and family therapist. You would like to help families collaborate to address family problems.

    Distribute the Roles and Responsibilities Across the Lifespan (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout. Individually, the students will use the information they obtained from the activity Family Lifespan Interview to create a storyboard. Students will select one person about whom to create a storyboard. The storyboard will depict the family lifespan, roles and responsibilities the individual has experienced. They may write or illustrate the information.

    Distribute and review Rubric for Roles and Responsibilities Across the Lifespan (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that students may understand what is expected.

    If instruction clarification is needed, model the activity process with your own lifespan information. Check for understanding.

    Students may volunteer to share their storyboards with the class.

    Possible questions for discussion:

    • Did the “Family Life Cycle Interview” activity open lines of communication among members of your household? If so, how?
    • What did you learn about your family and yourself?

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • creating a poster project by working with a peer tutor or in a small group setting
    • not grading for spelling
    • allowing note-taker use

  • Lesson Closure

    Review terms, definitions and lesson objectives.

    Teacher note: You may opt to print the Roll and Review handout on cardstock.

    Distribute the Roll and Review (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout. In groups of four, the students will write one lesson-based question on each panel of the cube. Inform the students to write their six questions on the panels prior to constructing the cube. Provide glue or tape to complete the cube.

    Each group will then pass its cube to another group. Sharing each other’s cubes will provide students with a broader range of questions. Groups will roll the cube and answer the lesson-based question that lands on the top. Each member will take turns rolling the cube and answering the questions. If a member does not know the answer to the question, the group members can offer assistance in answering the question. The cubes may be rotated among all groups if time allows.

    Monitor the review session, and you may opt to set a timer for the activity.

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Storyboards will be assessed with Rubric for Roles and Responsibilities Across the Lifespan.

    Optional:
    Reflection: Using the information they learned from the lesson, students will write a one-page reflection and how they will apply it to their lives, now and in the future. Content of the reflection may include how working with individuals requires continual evaluation and readjustment.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • providing extra time for assignments
    • providing copies of the slide presentation for study

  • References/Resources

    Images:

    • Photos obtained through a license with Shutterstock.com™.

    Textbooks:

    • Johnson, L. (2010). Strengthening family & self. (6th ed.). Tinley Park, Illinois: The Goodheart-Willcox Company. Inc.

    Websites:

    YouTube™:

    • Laura Kastner: Extreme Emotions
      Dr. Kastner discuss extreme emotions in extreme thoughts and avoiding the negativity track again.
      https://youtu.be/eCskmRQA-xY
  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • word wall
    • draw visual representation of term on word wall
    • add terms and definitions to personal dictionary
    • check for understanding
    • students repeat instructions
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Recommended Strategies

    Reading Strategies

    Current Events:
    Assign students to read about the family life cycle. Information can be found in newspaper articles, magazines, journals and online print.
    Suggestions:

    • A Brief Overview of Budgeting Through the Lifespan (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
    • Distribute the Reading Strategy: Understanding the Text (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout. Students will follow the steps on the handout to help them understand the text, ideas or statements.
  • Quotes

    If kids come to us from strong, healthy functioning families, it makes our job easier. If they do not come to us from strong, healthy, functioning families, it makes our job more important.
    -Barbara Colorose

    The bond that links your true family is not one of blood, but of respect and joy in each other’s life.
    -Richard Bach

    Family is not an important thing. It’s everything.
    -Michael J. Fox

    The love of family and the admiration of friends is much more important than wealth and privilege.
    -Charles Kuralt

  • Multimedia/Visual Strategies

    PowerPoint™:

    • Families Across the Lifespan
    • Presentation Notes for Families Across the Lifespan

    Technology:

    • TEDxTalk:
      • Kenneth Shinozuka: My simple invention, designed to keep my grandfather safe
        60% of people with dementia wander off, an issue that can prove hugely stressful for both patients and caregivers. In this charming talk, hear how teen inventor Kenneth Shinozuka came up with a novel solution to help his night-wandering grandfather and the aunt who looks after him … and how he hopes to help others with Alzheimer’s.
        https://youtu.be/tFX1nQLZUVM

    YouTube™:

    • Laura Kastner: Extreme Emotions
      Dr. Kastner discuss extreme emotions in extreme thoughts and avoiding the negativity track again.
      https://youtu.be/eCskmRQA-xY

    • Files for downloading:
  • Graphic Organizers/Handout

    Graphic Organizers:

    • Roll and Review
    • Slide Presentation Notes

    Handouts:

    • A Brief Overview of Budgeting Through the Lifespan
    • Family Lifespan Interview
    • Family Lifespan Scenarios
    • (Key) Family Lifespan Scenarios
    • Roles and Responsibilities Across the Lifespan
    • Reading Strategy: Understanding the Text
    • Roles in My Family
    • Rubric for Roles and Responsibilities Across the Lifespan

    • Files for downloading:
  • Writing Strategies

    Journal Entries:

    • My family is important to me because _____________________________.
    • My roles and responsibilities in my family consist of _________________________.

    Writing Strategy:

    RAFT Writing Strategy
    Role – Director of Family Services
    Audience – Parents
    Format – Monthly newsletter
    Topic – Strategies which allow for a strong family unit

  • Communication 90 Second Speech Topics

    • The kind of family I want to have is _________________________.
    • The pros and cons of having a family.
  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    • Students will interview their parents or other adults regarding expectations they have of children in their family and how their expectations change as children grow older. Students may volunteer to share their interview with the class.
    • Search the Internet to analyze different family structures in other countries. Compare and contrast with families in the United States.
    • Compile a list titled “What Makes a Family Strong” and ask students to correlate the list to their own family. How is it different? How is it similar?
    • Ask students to watch television to identify the different family structures as a homework assignment. Cite examples of different types from TV shows, movies, literature or history. For each type, list the positive and negative characteristics of each type of family structure.
    • Research the latest statistics on effects of societal, demographic and economic trends on individuals and the family.
    • Research the process of adopting a child in the United States. Compare findings to adopting a child from another country.

    Interpersonal Studies Math Assessment Problems

    • (8) The student determines how changes occurring throughout the family life cycle impact individuals and families. The student is expected to:
      • (B) examine roles and responsibilities of individuals and family members throughout the family life cycle.

    Question 4. Mr. Chan is excited about getting a 13% raise to his $3,000 monthly salary. His wife has been talking about wanting to go on a cruise that will cost $4,000 for two people. How many months will he need to save his 13% raise in order to be able to pay for the cruise for both of them?
    a. 2 months
    b. 6 months
    c. 11 months
    d. 16 months

    Answer: C

    TED Talks:

    TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks videos and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event.

    The video below is related to this lesson. Allow students to view the video and lead a discussion concerning the TED Talk.

    • Kenneth Shinozuka: My simple invention, designed to keep my grandfather safe
      60% of people with dementia wander off, an issue that can prove hugely stressful for both patients and caregivers. In this charming talk, hear how teen inventor Kenneth Shinozuka came up with a novel solution to help his night-wandering grandfather and the aunt who looks after him … and how he hopes to help others with Alzheimer’s.
      https://www.ted.com/talks/kenneth_shinozuka_my_simple_invention_designed_to_keep_my_grandfather_safe
  • Family/Community Connection

    • Discuss what the word “family” means to the students. Use http://www.tagxedo.com/ to develop a word cloud of the terms and adjectives.
    • Interview grandparents to gain an insight to how families and relationships have changed.
    • Bring pictures from home and share your family structure with the class.
  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)
    hppt://texasfccla.org

    STAR Events:

    • Advocacy
      An individual or team event, recognizes participants who demonstrate their knowledge, skills and abilities to actively identify a local, state, national or global concern, research the topic, identify a target audience and potential partnerships, form an action plan and advocate for the issue in an effort to positively affect a policy or law. Participants must prepare a portfolio, an oral presentation and complete a case study.
    • Illustrated Talk – An individual or team event – recognizes participants who make an oral presentation about issues concerning Family and Consumer Sciences and/or related occupations. Participants use visuals to illustrate content of the presentation.
    • Focus On Children
      An individual or team event – recognizes participants who use Family and Consumer Sciences skills to plan and conduct a child development project that has a positive impact on children and the community.
  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to the lesson. For additional information on service learning see
    http://www.ysa.org

    Students may approach the local chamber of commerce event planning committee to assist at an outdoor family fair. Students can provide an interactive display to engage the public on the importance of the building a strong and effective family unit.

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