Factors that Affect Housing Choices

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
Loading...
FavoriteLoadingAdd to favorites
  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Human Services

    Course : Dollars and Sense

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (3) The student demonstrates effective consumer skills related to housing needs. The student is expected to:
      • (A) explain consumer rights and responsibilities associated with renting or buying a home
      • (B) analyze legal and financial aspects of purchasing and leasing housing
      • (C) propose money-management skills necessary to make the transition from renting to home ownership
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • describe factors that affect housing choices
    • distinguish between different types of housing
    • compare the pros and cons of renting and buying a home
    • understand the steps necessary to make the transition from renting to home ownership
  • Rationale

    Housing decisions are some of the most important decisions consumers make. Housing expenses are usually the largest expenses a consumer must pay. Housing is a basic human need and can be a source of great psychological satisfaction. What are your housing essentials? How much can you afford to devote to housing? Should you buy or lease? In this lesson, we will study the factors that affect housing choices.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Five 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Balloon payment: A final loan payment that is much larger than the other installments

    Closing costs: Various fees that must be paid by the buyer or the seller when a home purchase is finalized

    Condominium ownership: A form of home ownership that involves individual ownership of a unit and shared ownership of common areas such as hallways and exterior grounds

    Down payment: A portion of a purchase price paid by cash or check at the time of purchase

    Duplex: A building that contains two separate living units

    Earnest money: A deposit to prove that a buyer is serious about purchasing a home

    Escrow account: A bank account in which money is held in trust

    Landlord: An owner of rental property

    Lease: A legal contract for renting a home that specifies the rights and responsibilities of the tenant and landlord

    Mortgage: A loan obtained to purchase real estate; a lien (a legal claim) on the home or property that secures the promise to pay the debt

    Tenant: A person, business or group that pays to use another person’s property. Someone who rents or leases a house or apartment from a landlord

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for PowerPoint™ presentation
    • computers with Internet access (be sure to follow district guidelines for Internet access)
    • presenter remote

    Materials:

    • apartment brochures
    • calculators
    • housing brochures
    • house plans
    • lease agreement
    • mortgage application
    • newspaper listing for homes and apartments
    • play money

    Supplies:

    • basket
    • cardstock
    • glue
    • markers
    • poster boards (one for every two students)
    • scissors
  • Anticipatory Set

    Prior to class:

    Note to teacher:

    Refer to Practical Money Skills for grades 9-12 for additional lesson plans, resources and activities. Educators can use the 22 free, standards-aligned lessons in sequence or on an individual basis.
    https://www.practicalmoneyskills.com/foreducators/lesson_plans/highschool.php

    Display as many of the lesson-related materials (see Materials or Specialized Equipment Needed) as you have available on a table in front of the room.

    Print the Housing Choices Flashcards (see All Lesson Attachments tab) on cardstock and cut them apart. Place the flashcards in a basket. The flashcards will be used during Independent Practice. Become familiar with PowerPoint™, handouts and activities.

    Before class begins:

    Allow students to observe the materials.

    Scenario: You are a recent high school graduate. You have decided to move out of your parents’ home and lease an apartment with your best friend.

    Distribute Apartment Checklist (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout. With a partner, students will list three things that are the most important to them in each category.

    Ask the following questions:

    • Why are these items on your checklist important to you?
    • What are the advantages and disadvantages of sharing an apartment with a friend?
    • What decisions and rules should be made before sharing an apartment with a friend?
    • What are your responsibilities as a tenant?
    • What are some responsibilities of the landlord?
    • Why is it important to make repair requests in writing? Should you keep a copy?

    Allow for questions and discussion.

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Distribute handout Note Taking: Factors that Affect Housing Choices (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Students will be expected to take notes while viewing the slide presentation. Teacher will determine the notes to be recorded by students.

    Introduce slide presentation Factors that Affect Housing Choices (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and begin the discussion with students. Allow for questions and answers to check for understanding.

    Distribute Housing Choices (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout. Students will complete the chart by comparing the two options on each table.

    Allow for questions and answers to check for understanding.

    YouTube™ video included in the PowerPoint™:

    Note to teacher: You have the option of showing the following videos. The videos are over ten minutes long and contain good information on housing issues.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • checking for understanding
    • providing a copy of the slide presentation

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Divide the class into groups of four. Distribute Financing a Home (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Assign each group one or more options for financing a home to research. Students will list and describe the advantages and disadvantages of each option when purchasing a home. As groups present their findings, lead students to discuss each option and fill in their charts for all.

    Allow for questions and answers. Check for understanding.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • allowing students extra time to complete the assignment
    • providing fill-in-the-blank note handouts for students to follow and fill in during the lesson
    • pairing students with elbow partners who can assist them with verbal and written responses to the lesson

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Note to teacher: Use the Housing Choices Flashcards which were placed in a basket.

    Divide the class into subgroups of two. One person from each group will draw a card from the basket. Assign each group one card to research. Give each group a large piece of poster board and supplies to complete the project.

    Distribute Rights and Responsibilities of Housing Choices (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout. Students will research the rights and responsibilities required to obtain and live in the particular housing option they have chosen. They will design a poster illustrating the characteristics of this type of dwelling and comparing its advantages and disadvantages. They will present their poster to the class. The poster must include the following:

    • Description of the type of dwelling
    • Illustrations of the type of dwelling
    • Rights of the tenant or owner
    • Responsibilities of the tenant or owner
    • Legal and financial aspects of purchasing and/or leasing the housing option
    • Advantages of the dwelling
    • Disadvantages of the dwelling
    • Explanation of the factors that affect this particular housing choice

    Distribute Rubric for Rights and Responsibilities of Housing Choices (See All Lesson Attachments tab) and review so students know what is expected.

    Allow for questions and discussion. Check for understanding.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • shortened, simplified instructions
    • repeated instructions
    • opportunity to repeat instructions
    • written instructions

  • Lesson Closure

    Review lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Students will complete Lesson Closure: Housing Choices (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout. This will be their exit pass. Student must answer the questions about what they learned before being allowed to leave the room.

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Students will present their housing options information to the class.

    Assess student presentations with the appropriate rubric.

    The students will write a one-page summary analyzing the importance of understanding the effective consumer skills related to housing needs. Students will reflect on how the lesson, activities and information will assist them in the future. The reflection, rubric and various handouts will be submitted for assessment.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • encouraging participation
    • extended “wait time”
    • working with a peer tutor
    • highlighted materials for emphasis

  • References/Resources

    Images:

    • Microsoft Clip Art: Used with permission from Microsoft.

    Textbooks:

    • Parnell Frances Baynor. (2001). Skills for personal and family living. (pp. 195-206). Tinley Park: The Goodheart-Willcox Publishing Company.
    • Ross Lowe, 2006. Consumer education & economics, student edition. 6 Edition. Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
    • Sasse Connie. (2004). Families today. (4th ed., pp. 285-304). New York: McGraw Hill Glencoe.

    Websites:

    YouTube™:

  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • Ask students to repeat your instructions back to you to be sure they know what is expected of them before each phase of the lesson.
    • Discuss vocabulary in detail and make sure everyone has a firm grasp on it before moving forward with the lesson.
    • Use graphic organizers and visuals to explain the lesson in detail.
    • Utilize Four Corners Vocabulary / Word Wall Activity http://cte.sfasu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/Four-Corner-Vocabulary2.pdf
    • Have students say and write the vocabulary words in their primary languages.
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    • Have students journal or create posters about different places they have lived.
    • Have students journal or create posters about their “dream” house.
    • For additional information on the rights and responsibilities of tenants and landlords, please have students read:
      • Fact Sheets
        What are your rights and responsibilities? Austin Tenant’s Council (ATC) fact sheets on a variety of tenant-landlord topics are available below. Option: Have students read the fact sheets and write a summary of the information.
        http://www.housing-rights.org/brochures.html
      • Application Fees and Procedures
      • Credit Rights in Texas
      • Evictions
      • Filing Suit in Small Claims Court
      • Foreclosures
      • A Landlord’s Guide to Renting Property
      • Landlord’s Entry
      • Landlord’s Lien
      • Lockouts
      • Locks and Other Security Devices
      • Manufactured Home Tenancies
      • The Myths of Renting in Texas
      • Paying Rent
      • Repairs: The Tenant’s Right and the Landlord’s Duty
      • Security Deposits
      • Smoke Detectors
      • Tips for Renters
      • Utilities
      • Who Is the Owner?

    Dollars and Sense Math Assessment Problems

    Question 10. Analyze the chart below.

    Question 10

    Which of the following would not be a reasonable conclusion from the graph?
    a. The interest amount plus the principle amount will always equal the
    monthly payment
    b. The monthly payment is around $1,200
    c. Eventually the principle amount will be greater than the interest amount
    d. The interest amount will always be the majority of the monthly payment

    Answer: D

    Dollars and Sense Writing Prompts

    Think about consumer rights and responsibilities associated with renting or buying a home. Write an essay explaining consumer rights and responsibilities associate with renting or buying a home. (9th and 10th grade expository writing)

    Think about money management skills necessary to make the transition from renting to home ownership. Write an essay explaining the money management skills necessary to make the transition from renting to home ownership. (9th and 10th grade expository writing)

    • TED Talk:
      TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks videos and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event.
      The video below is related to this lesson. Allow students to view the video and lead a discussion concerning the TED Talk.
      • Paul Pholeros: How to reduce poverty? Fix homes
        In 1985, architect Paul Pholeros was challenged by the director of an Aboriginal- controlled health service to “stop people getting sick” in a small indigenous community in south Australia. The key insights: think beyond medicine and fix the local environment. In this sparky, interactive talk, Pholeros describes projects undertaken by Healthabitat, the organization he now runs to help reduce poverty—through practical design fixes—in Australia and beyond.
        https://www.ted.com/talks/paul_pholeros_how_to_reduce_poverty_fix_homes
  • Family/Community Connection

    • Have students list their personal expectations for housing and describe the housing features they would choose to meet their expectations.
    • Have students find two newspaper, Internet or CraigsList advertisements for housing they feel would meet their needs and explain their reasoning in a paragraph.
  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)

    http://www.fcclainc.org

    National Program:

    The FCCLA Financial Fitness national peer education program involves youth teaching one another how to make, save and spend money wisely. Through FCCLA’s Financial Fitness program, youth plan and carry out projects that help them and their peers learn to become wise financial managers and smart consumers.

  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to the lesson.
    http://www.ysa.org/

    Create a consumer brochure outlining the responsibilities of both landlords and tenants.

    Develop a list of resources available to help tenants whose landlords fail to meet their obligations and maintain their properties.

No Comments

Leave A Reply