Customer Service – The Cornerstone of Restaurant Operations

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Hospitality and Tourism

    Course : Restaurant Management

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (3) The student solves problems using critical thinking, innovation and creativity independently and in teams. The student is expected to:
      • (A) generate creative ideas to solve problems by brainstorming possible solutions
      • (B) employ critical-thinking and interpersonal skills to resolve conflicts with individuals such as coworkers, customers, clients, and employers
    • (12) The student understands the use of technical knowledge and skills required to pursue careers in the restaurant industry, including knowledge of design, operation, and maintenance of technological systems. The student is expected to:
      • (A) define job-specific technical vocabulary
      • (B) analyze customer comments to formulate improvements in services and products and training of staff
      • (C) detail ways to achieve high rates of customer satisfaction
      • (D) use different types of payment options to facilitate customer payments for services
      • (E) demonstrate technical skills used in producing quality food service
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • identify different types of payment options
    • brainstorm solutions to improve customer comments
    • outline improvements to services
    • demonstrate skills used for quality customer service
  • Rationale

    Have you been to a business that has poor customer service? How did you feel? What did you do? This lesson will help you outline solutions and improvements to services that impact the customer.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Three 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Comment cards: Quick surveys that customers complete noting their satisfaction with the food and service

    Front line: An employee who regularly comes in contact with the customer

    Greeter: Provides the first impression in appearance, friendliness and attentiveness

    Hospitality: The feeling that guests take with them from their experience with the operation

    Problem solving skills: The ability an employee has to solve a wide range of problems

    Service: Work, behavior and actions of restaurant and foodservice employees that impact the customers’ experience in their establishment

    Suggestive selling: Involves recommending additional or different menu items to a guest; one of the keys to the success of the restaurant business

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for PowerPoint™ presentation
    • presenter /remote

    Materials:

    • calculator
    • cardstock
    • pen
    • SkillsUSA® Contest Singles for Restaurant Service (current)

    Supplies:

    • chairs
    • check presentation folders
    • guest checks
    • menus (various from local establishments)
    • tables

    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)

  • Anticipatory Set

    Note to teacher: Become familiar with the lesson in Restaurant Management:

    The lesson may work well with this lesson.

    Before class begins:

    On the table in front of the classroom, arrange various menus from local establishments such as.

    • hamburger chain
    • sandwich shop
    • ethnic restaurant
    • casual dining
    • five star restaurant

    Allow students to observe the menus and provide the following questions on the board:

    • What is similar between all of the menus? What is different?
    • What expectations do you have about the restaurants based on the menu?
    • Who do you think these menus are designed to target?

    Discuss the importance of quality customer service at these establishments to keep the customer returning.

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Review lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Distribute graphic organizer Customer Service: The Cornerstone of Restaurant Operations Notes (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that students may take notes during slide presentation.

    Introduce PowerPoint™ Customer Service: The Cornerstone of Restaurant Operations (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and discuss the importance of providing quality customer service.

    View YouTube™ video:

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • checking for understanding
    • provide assistance with notetaking

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Before class begins:
    Print Customer Reviews, Comments and Concerns (see All Lesson Attachments tab) on cardstock and cut apart. Place the cards in a basket.

    Divide the class into subgroups of three or four. Allow one student from each group to pick two cards from the basket.

    Distribute graphic organizer Customer Reviews, Comments and Concerns – Solutions (see All Lesson Attachments tab) to each group. Students are to brainstorm solutions to customer comments to formulate improvements in customer service and training of staff. They are to detail ways to achieve high rates of customer satisfaction from the negative customer comments.

    The solutions will be presented during Lesson Closure.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • encouraging group participation
    • peer tutoring

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Note to teacher: Refer to the current SkillsUSA® Contest Singles for Restaurant Service for more details.

    Divide the class into subgroups of three or four (or keep the same group from the Guided Practice section) and explain to students that they will be demonstrating how to provide quality customer service:

    Students will demonstrate technical skills used in quality customer service by:

    • greet and welcome guest
    • escort guest to table
    • converse politely with customer
    • present menus properly
    • introduce yourself (with a smile)
    • take drink and meal orders
    • use suggestive up-selling techniques

    Distribute Rubric for Customer Service Demonstration (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that students will know what is expected.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • assisting student in practicing service techniques
    • providing praise and encouragement

  • Lesson Closure

    Review lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Groups will present their graphic organizer Customer Reviews, Comments and Concerns – Solutions (see All Lesson Attachments tab) to the class.

    Ask students if the solutions are appropriate to the customer comments and discuss alternatives if needed.

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Students will take turns demonstrating technical skills used in producing quality customer service.

    Student demonstrations will be assessed with appropriate rubric.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • grading according to work done
    • providing praise and encouragement

  • References/Resources

    Textbook:

    • Culinary essentials. (2010). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw Hill.
    • Dahmer, Sondra.(2009). Restaurant Service Basics. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley and Sons.
    • Foundations of restaurant management & culinary arts: Level one. (2011). Boston, MA: Prentice Hall.
    • Remarkable service: a guide to winning and keeping customers for servers, managers, and restaurant owners. (2009). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.

    Website:

    YouTube™:

  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • use “word wall” for vocabulary words
    • work with a peer tutor
    • peer to read materials
    • highlighted materials for emphasis
    • shortened simplified instructions
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Recommended Strategies

    Reading Strategies

    Students can research current trends in customer satisfaction in the restaurant industry.
    Use food magazines, dining sections of major newspapers or internet sources that are current and relevant.

    Example:

    Have students think about customer service problems that their family has encountered. Students can create a story board to tell the story of the problem and how it was resolved. By creating a story board, the student is able to use different applications in telling a story; thus improving their verbal, reading and written skills.

  • Quotes

    If you’re not serving the customer, your job is to be serving someone who is.
    -Jan Carlzon

    Customer satisfaction is worthless. Customer loyalty is priceless.
    -Jeffrey Gitomer

    There is only one boss. The customer. And he can fire everybody in the company from the chairman on down simply by spending his money somewhere else.
    -Sam Walton

  • Multimedia/Visual Strategies

    PowerPoint:

    • Customer Service: The Cornerstone of Restaurant Operations
    • Presentation Notes – Customer Service: The Cornerstone of Restaurant Operations

    Technology:

    Files for downloading:

  • Graphic Organizers/Handout

    Graphic Organizers:

    • Customer Reviews, Comments and Concerns – Solutions
    • Customer Service: The Cornerstone of Restaurant Operations
    • Customer Service: The Cornerstone of Restaurant Operations (Key)

    Handouts:

    • Customer Reviews, Comments and Concerns
    • Rubric for Customer Service Demonstration

    Files for downloading:

  • Writing Strategies

    Journal Entries:

    • I hate it when restaurants….
    • I love it when restaurants…
    • I see myself working at _________ restaurant because…..

    Writing Strategy:

    • RAFT (Role, Audience,Format, Topic)
      • Role: manager on duty
      • Audience: disgruntled guest
      • Format: email
      • Topic: service was slow at their birthday party
  • Communication 90 Second Speech Topics

    • What role does the front line employee have in managing customer satisfaction?
    • What role does technology systems have in improving customer experience?
    • How can we anticipate guests’ needs?
  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    Have students visit their favorite restaurant and conduct a customer service audit based on:

    • attention to detail
    • consistency
    • personalized service

    They can report their findings to the class.

  • Family/Community Connection

    Invite a restaurant manager to speak to the class on the importance of quality customer service and how it impacts the business.

  • CTSO connection

    SkillsUSA

    http://www.skillsusa.org/

    • Career Pathways Showcase (formerly Tech Prep Showcase) – Student teams will use their course of study as the basis of a project that will benefit their class, school, community or industry. The project must highlight an aspect of their career cluster training. Upon completion of the project, the students will develop a display and use it within their community to explain their training and their project. This contest will judge mastery of their training, its application, the project’s benefit to their community and display and presentation techniques.
    • Customer Service – Evaluates students’ proficiency in providing customer service. The contest involves live, role-playing situations. Contestants demonstrate their ability to perform customer service in both written and oral forms including telephone and computer skills, communications, problem solving, conflict resolution and business etiquette.
    • Restaurant Service (formerly Food and Beverage Service) – Contestants are tested on skills required in the “front of the house” of a fine restaurant. The focus is on guest service and guest relations in the dining room including: table set up; greeting guests; reservations procedures; presentation of menus; description of food, drinks, soups and specials of the day; taking orders; serving each course and clearing the table after each course; and preparation and presentation of the check and closing remarks. Contestants are judged on personal appearance, tableside manner, professionalism, ease with guests, courtesy, general knowledge and technical and verbal skills.
  • Service Learning Projects

    True service learning is developed with student voice about concerns and needs. As the students are learning and researching this topic, ask them to think about ways they can maximize their learning to benefit others.

    http://www.servicelearning.org

    Allow students to brainstorm ways the lesson relates to service projects:

    Example:
    Students can volunteer at a nursing or retirement home in their dining room. The students can plan a customer service experience for the residents and then process the experience as a group.

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