Count It Out! Change Makes Cents

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Hospitality and Tourism

    Course : Culinary Arts

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    Culinary Arts

    • (1) The student applies advanced reading, writing, mathematics and science skills for the food service industry. The student is expected to:
      • (C) calculate correctly using numerical concepts such as percentages and estimations in practical situations, including weight and measures
    • (3) The student demonstrates an understanding that personal success depends on personal effort. The student is expected to:
      • (C) demonstrate positive attitudes and work habits

    • (8) The student demonstrates leadership, citizenship and teamwork skills required for success. The student is expected to:
      • (B) apply decision-making and problem-solving skills

    Practicum in Culinary Arts

    • (1) The student uses employability skills to gain an entry-level job in a high-skill, high-wage or high-demand field. The student is expected to:
      • (B) demonstrate the application of essential workplace skills in the career acquisition process
    • (2) The student develops skills for success in the workplace. The student is expected to:
      • (D) demonstrate appropriate business and personal etiquette in the workplace
      • (E) exhibit productive work habits, ethical practices and a positive attitude
      • (J) demonstrate effective verbal, non-verbal, written and electronic communication skills
      • (K) apply effective listening skills used in the workplace
    • (4) The student applies academics with job-readiness skills. The student is expected to:
      • (A) apply mathematical skills to business transactions

    Restaurant Management

    • (1) The student gains academic knowledge and skills required to pursue the full range of career and postsecondary education opportunities within the restaurant industry. The student is expected to:
      • (C) calculate correctly using numerical concepts such as percentages and estimations in practical situations
    • (2) The student uses verbal and nonverbal communication skills to create, express, and interpret information for providing a positive experience for guests and employees. The student is expected to:
      • (E) apply active listening skills to obtain and clarify information
    • (7) The student uses leadership and teamwork skills in collaborating with others to accomplish organizational goals and objectives. The student is expected to:
      • (B) apply decision-making and problem-solving skills
    • (8) The student knows and understands the importance of professional ethics and legal responsibilities within the restaurant industry. The student is expected to:
      • (A) demonstrate ethical reasoning in a variety of workplace situations in order to make decisions
    • (9) The student demonstrates an understanding that personal success depends on personal effort. The student is expected to:
      • (B) identify behaviors needed to be employable and maintain employment such as positive work ethics and positive personal qualities
      • (E) follow directions and procedures independently
    • (11) The student knows and understands the importance of employability skills. The student is expected to:
      • (A) demonstrate skills related to seeking employment in the restaurant industry
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • identify essential skills for cashiers
    • relate positive customer service to cashier service
    • identify skills needed to make change
    • practice and demonstrate using math skills by properly counting back change
  • Rationale

    In this digital and computer age, many cash registers or Point of Sales (POS) terminals display the change due to the customer. As a food service employee, it is important, for various reasons, to learn how to count back change manually. This lesson will teach you how to count change back to a customer correctly.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Three 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Active listening: Giving full attention to what other people are saying

    Adaptability: Being open to change and variety in the workplace

    Analytical thinking: Analyzing information and using logic as you address work related issues

    Bank: The money you start with at the beginning of the cashier’s shift

    Cashier: A person handling payments and receipts in a restaurant, store or other business

    Change: Paper money or coins

    Cooperation: Being pleasant as you work and interact with others

    Integrity: Being honest and ethical, even when no one is looking or watching

    Jargon: Vocabulary for a specific industry

    Menu/Product knowledge: Knowledge of menu items, their preparation techniques and ingredients, in addition to price

    Reconcile: Verifying the amount of cash in a till or drawer at the close of a shift/business day

    Self-Control: Keeping emotions in check, maintaining composure, controlling anger including during stressful situations

    Speaking: Talking to others effectively and clearly

    Stress tolerance: Being able to accept criticism while reacting calmly to high stress situations

    Till: Drawers with an amount of money loaned to the cashier at the beginning of the shift

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for PowerPoint™ presentation
    • light projector (Elmo)

    Materials:

    • basket
    • cardstock
    • Post-It® Notes

    Supplies:

    • cash box (if available)
    • cash register (if available)
    • realistic play money, with coins (if available)

    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Anticipatory Set

    Before class begins:

    Prepare several copies of the handout Coins and Currency (see All Lesson Attachments tab) by printing on cardstock and separating the coins and currency.

    Print the cards Change Makes Cents Practice Scenarios (see All Lesson Attachments tab) on cardstock. Cut and separate and place the cards in a basket to be used in the Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience section.

    Display on a table as many supplies as you have available (see Material/Specialized Equipment Needed tab).

    As students walk into the classroom, hand each of them a Post-It® Note.

    Display the following problem on the board and ask students to answer it.

    A customer’s bill came to $13.13. The customer paid you with $20.00. What is his/her change? List the currency and coins needed.

    Answer: $20.00 – $13.13 = $6.87 (one $5.00, one $1.00, three quarters, one dime, two pennies)

    Begin a discussion on the importance of counting change back to a customer and not just handing the change back.

    The following questions may be asked:

    • Do you count your change after you receive it from the cashier?
    • Do you feel that the cashier is handing you the correct change?
    • Do you and your family use cash to pay for items or do you use credit/debit cards?
    • What would happen if you were employed in a small bakery where there is not a Point of Sales (POS) system available and a cash box is used instead? Could you make change?

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Distribute the handout Note-Taking – Count It Out! Change Makes Cents (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that students may take notes during the slide presentation.

    Introduce PowerPoint™ Count It Out! Change Makes Cents (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and discuss the importance of handling money correctly when dealing with customers.

    View YouTube™ video:

    • Career One Stop – Cashiers
      Receive and disburse money in establishments other than financial institutions. May use electronic scanners, cash registers, or related equipment. May process credit or debit card transactions and validate checks.
      http://youtu.be/TG9l3U0Gq6o?list=UU8opl10LrVIBL_JlcHFKWRg

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • check for understanding
    • provide a printed copy of the slide presentation

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Place the handout Count It Out Tips (see All Lesson Attachments tab) on the light projector and discuss the tips to counting change back to customers.

    Work the practice problem together and emphasize the importance of this skill.

    View the YouTube™ video for more tips:

    • How to make change (cash register)
      We walk through two examples of how to make change from a cash register.
      http://youtu.be/KkvfoNyZSoA

    Distribute the handout Just Coins (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and allow students to work the problems.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • peer mentor
    • check for understanding

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Divide the class into subgroups of two.

    Explain the scenario below:

    You have secured your first summer job working in a concession stand at your local community youth baseball park. A cash box is used instead of a cash register so you will need to know how to make change.

    Place the Change Makes Cents Practice Scenarios (see All Lesson Attachments tab) in a basket and allow one member from each group to choose a card.

    Students will use realistic play money (if available) or Coins and Currency (see All Lesson Attachments tab) to complete the transactions.

    Distribute Rubric for Change Makes Cents Role-Play (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that students will understand what is expected.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • encourage participation
    • provide extra time if needed

  • Lesson Closure

    Review lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Let’s keep practicing – What is the change for the following scenario?

    The customer purchased two double scoop ice cream cones, one banana split and one milk shake. The order total came to $14.71. The customer gave you $20.00. List the currency and change you would give the customer.

    Answer: $20.00 – $14.71 = $5.29 (one $5.00, one quarter, four pennies)

    Continue the discussion with the following questions:

    • Why is it a positive practice to count change back to customers?
    • Have credit/debit cards replaced cash?
    • How do you think the new Apple™ Pay will affect the food industry?
    • Why is it important to count accurately when giving change back to a customer?

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Students will be assessed with the handout Change Makes Cents Quiz (see All Lesson Attachments tab).

    Students will present the role-play scenarios and be assessed with the appropriate rubric.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • highlighted test
    • oral test

  • References/Resources

    Article:

    YouTube™ videos:

    • Career One Stop – Cashiers
      Receive and disburse money in establishments other than financial institutions. May use electronic scanners, cash registers, or related equipment. May process credit or debit card transactions and validate checks.
      http://youtu.be/TG9l3U0Gq6o?list=UU8opl10LrVIBL_JlcHFKWRg
    • How to make change (cash register)
      We walk through two examples of how to make change from a cash register.
      http://youtu.be/KkvfoNyZSoA

    Website:

  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • word wall
    • draw visual representations of terms on word wall
    • add terms and definitions to personal dictionary
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Recommended Strategies

    Reading Strategies

    Other articles pertaining to this lesson that students may read include:

    Reading strategy:
    Encourage students to “visualize” as they read. Many students are visual learners and will benefit from making sketches or diagrams on scrap paper as they read. Providing students with graphic organizers to help them organize their thoughts is also helpful.

  • Quotes

    It’s easier to keep a customer than get a new one.
    -Allan Keller

    Customers don’t expect you to be perfect. They do expect you to fix things when they go wrong.
    -Donald Porter

    Customer service is not a department, it is an attitude.
    -Unknown

  • Multimedia/Visual Strategies

    PowerPoint™:

    • Count It Out! Change Makes Cents
    • Presentation notes – Count it Out! Change Makes Cents

    Technology:

    Files for downloading:

  • Graphic Organizers/Handout

    Graphic Organizers:

    • Coins and Currency

    Handouts:

    • Change Makes Cents Practice Scenarios
    • Change Makes Cents Practice Scenarios (Key)
    • Change Makes Cents Quiz
    • Change Makes Cents Quiz (Key)
    • Count It Out Tips
    • Just Coins
    • Just Coins (Key)
    • Note-Taking – Count It Out! Change Makes Cents
    • Rubric for Change Makes Cents Role-Play

    Files for downloading:

  • Writing Strategies

    Journal Entries:

    • Being a cashier is an important job because …
    • I think carrying change in your purse or pocket is a thing of the past because …
    • Math in the food industry includes …

    Writing Strategy:

    • RAFT Writing Strategy:
      • Role – cashier
      • Audience – restaurant manager
      • Topic – till is short $20.00
      • Format – memo

    Write a memo to the restaurant manager explaining why your register is short $20.00 (two twenties may have stuck together).

  • Communication 90 Second Speech Topics

    • Three examples of math calculations in the food industry include …
    • Different forms of payment include …
  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    If the opportunity is available, plan a staff mobile café.

    Students may create a limited menu with pre-made beverages and snacks.

    Students will write the menu, calculate prices and collect pre-orders.

    On the day of the mobile café, supply students with a “till.”

    Be sure to document the starting money in the till as well as a beginning product inventory. When students deliver their orders, they are to count back change to the customer. When they return they are to reconcile their till and inventory their cart

    Infographics:

    Infographics are graphic visual representations of information, data or knowledge intended to present complex information quickly and clearly.

    The infographic below is related to this lesson. Allow students to view the image on a projector and lead a discussion concerning the information provided.

  • Family/Community Connection

    Observation – Assign students to observe cashier transactions when they shop alone or with their parents.

    A T-Chart graphic organizer may be used. One side may include the names of retail/food venues where the cashier counts the change back to the customer and the other side may include where cashiers did not count the change to the customer.

    A discussion as to whether the customer feels this is an important part of a transaction may take place.

  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career and Community Leaders of America

    http://www.fcclainc.org

    • Applied Math for Culinary Management
      An individual or team event, recognizes participants who use Family and Consumer Sciences skills to demonstrate the application of mathematical concepts in the culinary arts industry.

    SkillsUSA

    http://skillsusa.org/

    • Restaurant Service
      Contestants are tested on skills required in the “front of the house” of a fine restaurant. The focus is on guest service and guest relations in the dining room including: table set up; greeting guests; reservations procedures; presentation of menus; description of food, drinks, soups and specials of the day; taking orders; serving each course and clearing the table after each course; and preparation and presentation of the check and closing remarks. Contestants are judged on personal appearance, tableside manner, professionalism, ease with guests, courtesy, general knowledge and technical and verbal skills.
  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to this lesson.
    www.ysa.org

    Possible ideas:
    Contact local non-profit agencies and volunteer to assist with any fundraising activities in order to practice their cashier skills.

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