ChooseMyPlate – Physical Activity and Sports Nutrition

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Human Services

    Course : Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (1) The student understands the role of nutrients in the body. The student is expected to:
      • (B) assess the effects of nutritional intake on health, appearance, effective job performance and personal life
    • (2) The student understands the principles of digestion and metabolism. The student is expected to:
      • (C) apply knowledge of digestion and metabolism when making decisions related to food intake and physical fitness
      • (D) locate community resources that promote physical activity and fitness
      • (E) explain the relationship of activity levels and caloric intake to health and wellness, including weight management
    • (6) The student demonstrates effective work habits. The student is expected to:
      • (A) participate as an effective team member demonstrating cooperation and responsibility
      • (B) apply effective practices for managing time and energy to complete tasks on time
      • (C) practice problem solving using leadership and teamwork skills
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • analyze how nutritional intake affects physical activity
    • assess new ways to add physical activity to their routines
    • organize local community resources that promote physical activity and fitness
    • summarize why physical activity is important
    • outline tips for increasing physical activity
  • Rationale

    (Updated 5/5/2014) Being physically active can improve your health — today, tomorrow and in the future. However, most people do not do enough physical activity. People of all types, shapes, sizes and abilities can benefit from being physically active. The more you do, the greater the health benefits and the better you’ll feel.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Four 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Aerobic exercise: An activity that works the heart and lungs

    Anaerobic exercise: Involving short, intense bursts of activity

    Athlete: A person who is proficient in sports and other forms of physical exercise

    BMI (Body Mass Index) A measurement of body fat that uses a ratio of weight to height

    Physical Activity: Using muscles to move the body

    Sedentary: Physically inactive

    Sports Nutrition: The study of the practice of nutrition and diet as it relates to athletic performance

    Supplements: A dietary substance that contains nutrients and other food substances that add to your diet

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with Internet access for multimedia presentations
    • computer lab with Internet access (be sure to follow school district guidelines)

    Materials:

    • Be Active Your Way – A Guide for Adults Ages 18 to 64 (based on the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans) (see All Lesson Attachments tab) (few copies)
    • index cards
    • Get in the Game (see All Lesson Attachments tab) (few copies)
    • MyPlate Community Toolkit (see All Lesson Attachments tab) (few copies)

    Supplies:

    • dog leash
    • exercise ball
    • hand weights
    • jump rope
    • workout video
    • yoga mat

    • copies for handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)

  • Anticipatory Set

    Before class begins:

    Gather as many supplies as you have available from the Materials and Specialized Equipment Needed section as well as a few copies of the Be Active Your Way – A Guide for Adults Ages 18 to 64, Get in the Game and MyPlate Community Toolkit (see All Lesson Attachments tab).

    Allow students to view the items and ask the following questions?

    • How much physical activity do you do?
    • Do you exercise outside or in a gym?
    • Do you do aerobic exercise? Resistance training?
    • Do you know what a personal trainer is?
    • How many days do you exercise and for how long?
    • Are your family members physically active?
    • Are you involved in sports?
    • Are you interested in running/walking in a marathon?
    • What is your favorite physical activity?
  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Connect your computer to a multimedia projector to view each section of the ChooseMyPlate website.

    ChooseMyPlate – Physical Activity
    http://www.choosemyplate.gov/physical-activity.html

    Distribute handout ChooseMyPlate – Physical Activity (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that students may take notes.

    Review and discuss each page with your students so they become familiar with physical activity, the health benefits and tips to include physical activity in their daily routines.

    Physical Activity

    • What is Physical Activity?
    • Why is it Important?
    • How Much is Needed?
    • How Many Calories Can I Burn?
    • Tips for Increasing Physical Activity

    View the following videos to explain physical activity.

    • Physical Activity Guidelines — Introduction
      Why does physical activity matter? Regular physical activity can produce long-term health benefits by reducing your risk of many health conditions, such as heart disease and diabetes. It can also increase your chances of living longer, help you control your weight, and even help you sleep better.
      http://youtu.be/lEutFrar1dI
    • Physical Activity Guidelines – Getting Started
      It’s important for your health and well-being to be physically active. Sometimes getting started is the hardest part of about being physically active.
      http://youtu.be/qNdoOd11Vi8

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • checking for understanding
    • peer tutor

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce PowerPoint™ Sports Nutrition: Eating Healthy and Keeping Fit (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Follow the script at the bottom of the presentation notes.

    Distribute handouts Eating Before Exercise, Eating During Exercise, Eating for Recovery, Eating on the Road, and Exercise Hydration (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Allow students to read the scenarios and discuss the solutions.

    Distribute graphic organizer Community Physical Activities Resources (see All Lesson Attachments tab).
    As a class, brainstorm local activities available for the community such as names of gyms, personal trainers, athletic events offered and so forth.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • repeated instructions
    • shortened, simplified instructions

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Divide class into six or seven subgroups.

    Explain to groups that it is important to be able to locate resources in their community that everyone can access to be physically active. Each group will design a brochure using Microsoft Word ™ brochure templates and investigate one of the Community Physical Activities Resources discussed in the Guided Practice section.

    Students should locate addresses, phone numbers, fees, activities offered, and any other important information and design a brochure about their resource.

    This brochure may be distributed to family and community members interested in increasing their physical activity.

    Distribute Rubric for Community Activities Brochure (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that students understand what is expected.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • extended time for assignments
    • check for understanding

  • Lesson Closure

    Review lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Physical Activity Goals and Motives
    Distribute one index card to students and allow them to set physical activity goals for the term and the reason for these goals.
    Ask students to verbalize their goals to the class and their motive to increase their physical activity. Reasons may include to: lose weight, avoid health complications, increase self-esteem, feel better and so forth.

    These index cards may be revisited at the end of the term to see if goals were met.

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Students will present their local community activities brochures to the class.

    Students will be assessed with appropriate rubric.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • encourage participation
    • assist in presentation

  • References/Resources

    Textbooks:

    • Duyff, R. L. (2010). Food, nutrition & wellness. Columbus, OH: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
    • Kowtaluk, H. (2010) Food for today. Columbus, OH: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
    • Weixel, S., & Wempen, F. (2010). Food & nutrition and you. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson/Prentice Hall.

    YouTube™:

    • Physical Activity Guidelines — Introduction
      Why does physical activity matter? Regular physical activity can produce long-term health benefits by reducing your risk of many health conditions, such as heart disease and diabetes. It can also increase your chances of living longer, help you control your weight, and even help you sleep better.
      http://youtu.be/lEutFrar1dI
    • Physical Activity Guidelines – Getting Started
      It’s important for your health and well-being to be physically active. Sometimes getting started is the hardest part of about being physically active.
      http://youtu.be/qNdoOd11Vi8

    Websites:

    • Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
      The worlds largest organization of food and nutrition professionals
      http://eatright.org
  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Recommended Strategies

    Reading Strategies

    Students may read more about Sports Nutrition at the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics website.
    http://www.eatright.org/Public/list.aspx?TaxID=6442452022

    Articles include:

    • Eating for Strength and Recovery
    • Protein and the Athlete – How Much Do You Need?
    • 5 Snacks for Your Bike Ride
    • Eat Right to Play Hard
    • Top Snacks for Runners

    The Arthritis Pain Reliever
    http://www.cdc.gov/features/arthritispain/

    Physical Activity
    http://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/everyone/health/

    Encourage students to “visualize” as they read. Many students are visual learners and will benefit from making sketches or diagrams on scrap paper as they read. Providing students with graphic organizers to help them organize their thoughts is also helpful.

  • Quotes

    Today, more than 95% of all chronic disease is caused by food choice, toxic food ingredients, nutritional deficiencies and lack of physical exercise.
    -Mike Adams

    My mother was a P.E. teacher, and she was kind of a fanatic about fitness and nutrition growing up, so it was ingrained in me at a young age. As I get older, I’m finding out it’s not about getting all buffed up and looking good. It’s more about staying healthy and flexible.
    -Josh Duhamel

    A man too busy to take care of his health is like a mechanic too busy to take care of his tools.
    -Spanish Proverb

    These small things — nutrition, place, climate, recreation, the whole casuistry of selfishness — are inconceivably more important than everything one has taken to be important so far.
    -Friedrich Nietzsche

  • Multimedia/Visual Strategies

    PowerPoint™:

    • Sports Nutrition: Eating Healthy and Keeping Fit
    • Presentation Notes – Sports Nutrition: Eating Healthy and Keeping Fit

    Technology:

    • TEDx Talks:
      • The Importance of Movement: John Ratey at TEDxManhattanBeach
        While exercise is good for the body, Dr. John J. Ratey, MD, argues it is more important for the brain; especially when it comes to students in the classroom. Citing scientific studies and real world examples, this internationally recognized expert in the brain-exercise connection demonstrates how we can raise test scores, lower behavioral problems, and help the overall well-being of today’s students with fitness based physical education.
        http://tedxtalks.ted.com/video/The-Importance-of-Movement-John;search%3AThe%20importance%20of%20movement

    Files for downloading:

  • Graphic Organizers/Handout

    Graphic Organizer:

    • ChooseMyPlate – Physical Activity
    • ChooseMyPlate – Physical Activity (Key)
    • Community Physical Activities Resources
    • Community Physical Activities Resources (Key)

    Handouts:

    • Be Active Your Way – A Guide for Adults Ages 18 to 64
    • Get in the Game
    • MyPlate Community Toolkit
    • NFS Eating Before Exercise
    • NFS Eating During Exercise
    • NFS Eating for Recovery
    • NFS Eating on the Road
    • NFS Exercise Hydration
    • Rubric for Community Activities Brochure
    • Smart Snacking for Adults and Teens

    Files for downloading:

  • Writing Strategies

    Journal Entries:

    • My favorite water sport is __________ because …….
    • My least favorite form of physical activity is ______ because …..
    • My physical activity goals for the year are …..
    • I will encourage my family to be more active by ……

    Writing Strategy:

    • RAFT writing strategy
      • Role – personal trainer
      • Audience – overweight student
      • Format – outline of exercises and foods to eat
      • Topic – physical activity goals to lose weight
  • Communication 90 Second Speech Topics

    My three favorite outdoor activities are …..
    Four reasons to be physically active are ….

  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    If budgets allows, students may make some of the snacks listed in the handout Smart Snacking for Adults and Teens (see All Lesson Attachments tab).

    Snacks with 200 to 300 calories for active adults, teens and athletes are included.

    TEDx Talk:

    TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event.

    The video below is related to this lesson. Allow students to view the video and lead a discussion concerning the TEDx Talk.

    • The Importance of Movement: John Ratey at TEDxManhattanBeach
      While exercise is good for the body, Dr. John J. Ratey, MD, argues it is more important for the brain; especially when it comes to students in the classroom. Citing scientific studies and real world examples, this internationally recognized expert in the brain-exercise connection demonstrates how we can raise test scores, lower behavioral problems, and help the overall well-being of today’s students with fitness based physical education.
      http://tedxtalks.ted.com/video/The-Importance-of-Movement-John;search%3AThe%20importance%20of%20movement

    Human Services Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness Writing Prompt

    • (6) The student demonstrates effective work habits. The student is expected to:
      • (B) apply effective practices for managing time and energy to complete tasks on time

    Think about effective practices for time and energy management. Imagine you have a friend who does not have good time and energy management skills. Write an essay persuading your friend to begin to apply effective practices for managing time and energy.
    (10th and 11th grade persuasive writing)

  • Family/Community Connection

    Students are encouraged to include their family in physical activities and motivate them to:

    • play outdoor games
    • ride bicycles
    • roller blade/roller skate
    • walk

    Invite a personal trainer/nutritionist to speak to the class about their career and how they motivate people to eat right and keep active.

  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)

    http://www.texasfccla.org

    • Nutrition and Wellness
      An individual event – recognizes participants who track food intake and physical activity for themselves, their family, or a community group and determine goals and strategies for improving their overall health.
  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to lesson. For additional information on service learning, see http://www.ysa.org

    Example:
    Organize an after-school fitness program for students. Be sure to ask permission from school administration.

    Ideas may include:

    • racquetball
    • running
    • tennis
    • video workouts
    • walking
    • zumba dance