ChooseMyPlate – Oils and Fats

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Human Services

    Course : Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (1) The student understands the role of nutrients in the body. The student is expected to:
      • (A) classify nutrients, their functions, and food sources and compare the nutritive value of various foods
      • (B) assess the effects of nutritional intake on health, appearance, effective job performance, and personal life
    • (4) The student understands safety and sanitation. The student is expected to:
      • (A) demonstrate safe and sanitary practices int he use, care, and storage of food and equipment
      • (C) practice appropriate dress and personal hygiene in food preparation
    • (5) The student demonstrates knowledge of food management principles. The student is expected to:
      • (A) read and comprehend standard recipes
      • (B) correctly use standard measuring techniques and equipment
      • (C) demonstrate correct food preparation techniques, including nutrient retention
      • (D) use food buying strategies such as calculating food costs, planning food budgets, and creating grocery lists
      • (E) demonstrate food preparation techniques to reduce overall fat and calories
      • (F) practice etiquette, food presentation, and table service appropriate for specific situations
      • (G) apply food storage principles
    • (6) The student demonstrates effective work habits. The student is expected to:
      • (A) participate as an effective team member demonstrating cooperation and responsibility
      • (B) apply effective practices for managing time and energy to complete tasks on time
      • (C) practice problem solving using leadership and teamwork skills
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • focus on oils and their health benefits
    • analyze fats for their functions and food sources
    • determine the effects of fats
    • plan and prepare a recipe substituting the fat with healthier options
  • Rationale

    Oils are not a food group, but they do provide essential nutrients and are therefore included in USDA recommendations for what to eat. Note that only small amounts of oils are recommended.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Four 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Cholesterol: A fatlike substance in cells that is needed for many body processes

    Functions: To serve a particular purpose

    HDL (high-density lipoprotein): Picks up excess cholesterol and takes it back to the lever for excretion

    Hydrogenation: Turns vegetable oils into solids

    LDL (low-density lipoprotein): takes cholesterol from the liver to wherever it is needed in the body

    Nutrients: A chemical substance, such as protein, carbohydrates, fat, or fiber, that your body needs to function, grow, repair itself, and create energy

    Saturated Fatty Acids: A fatty acid that contains all the hydrogen it can chemically hold

    Sources: The place, person, or thing through which something has come into being or from which it has been obtained

    Trans fats: Increase LDL cholesterol levels and lower HDL cholesterol levels

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with Internet access for multimedia presentations
    • computer lab with Internet access (be sure to follow school district guidelines)

    Materials:

    • fatty food replicas (if available)
    • magazine pictures of fats (fried chicken, french fries)

    Supplies:

    • replica of MyPlate (if available)

    • copies for handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)

  • Anticipatory Set

    Note to Teacher:

    The introductory lesson to the nutrients, ChooseMyPlate, and SuperTracker is:

    • Nutrition Principles for a Lifetime of Wellness

    This is the sixth lesson of six that follows the ChooseMyPlate food groups. The others include:

    • ChooseMyPlate – Fruits and Water-Soluble Vitamins
    • ChooseMyPlate – Vegetables and Fat-Soluble Vitamins
    • ChooseMyPlate – Grains and Carbohydrates
    • ChooseMyPlate – Protein Foods and Trace Minerals
    • ChooseMyPlate – Dairy, Major Minerals, and Electrolytes

    These lessons may be taught individually in any sequence you prefer or may be taught as a whole.

    The functions, food sources, defeciences and excesses on the slide presentation were compiled using three different texts. You may use information from your text or a reliable source to complete these sections.

    Before class begins:

    Review recipes from the cookbooks provided by the SNAP-Ed Connection Recipe Finder Database. Recipes included in the database have been reviewed by nutrition professionals at the SNAP-Ed Connection using specific cost and nutrition criteria. Recipes are consistent with the current Dietary Guidelines for Americans and MyPlate. All recipes include the nutritional and cost analysis.

    Cookbooks (see All Lesson Attachments tab):

    • Fast and Easy Recipes
    • Healthy Recipes

    These cookbooks and more are also available in the Resource section of the Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness home page.

    or search for low-fat recipes in the Recipe Finder section:
    http://recipefinder.nal.usda.gov/

    Display fruit food replicas (if available) or fruit images from magazines at a table in front of the room. Make a few copies of the handouts listed in the Materials or Specialized Equipment Needed tab to display as well. Encourage students to discuss fruits how they add fruit to their daily diet.

    Ask students to recall the foods with oils and fats they have eaten in the last three days.
    Allow them to add the foods to the Food Tracker section of the SuperTracker. They will be able to view how their daily choices stack up to their food group targets and daily limits.
    Or, have students list the foods on a sheet of paper if computers are not available.
    With your computer connected to a multimedia projector, log into the SuperTracker website.
    https://www.supertracker.usda.gov/
    Type in some of their choices to evaluate the amount, daily calorie limit, and daily food group targets. Discuss the results.

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Distribute handouts Build a Healthy Meal – 10 Tips for Healthy Meals (see All Lesson Attachments tab) from the 10 Tips Nutrition Education Series. Allow students to review the tips to encourage eating low fat foods. This handout may be included in their personal Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness Cookbook.

    Connect your computer to a multimedia projector to view each page of the ChooseMyPlate website.

    ChooseMyPlate – Oils
    http://www.choosemyplate.gov/food-groups/oils.html

    Distribute graphic organizer ChooseMyPlate – Oils (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that students may take notes.

    Review and discuss each page with your students so they become familiar with the nutrients, health benefits, and needed amounts. Be prepared to do an image search of oils students are not familiar with.

    Oils

    • What are “Oils”?
    • How Are Oils Different from Solid Fats?
    • Why Is it Important to Consume Oils?
    • What’s My Allowance?
    • What Counts as a Teaspoon?

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • checking for understanding
    • encourage participation

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce PowerPoint™ Fats (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Allow students to take notes on their own paper (typed or handwritten) as you review the functions and sources of the vitamins as well as deficiencies and excesses or use the graphic organizer Fats (see All Lesson Attachments tab).

    Divide students into lab groups so that they may plan for the Oils or Fats lab. They may choose their own recipe or review one provided by you. They will compile a grocery list of needed items. Encourage students to make healthier versions of recipes by substituting the fat with healthier ingredients.

    Distribute handout Substitutions and Healthier Cooking and Baking (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Students may use this handout to substitute higher calorie ingredients for healthier items.

    Divide students into lab groups. Remind students of safety procedures, appropriate dress and personal hygiene in food preparation.

    Distribute the Rubric for Laboratory Experience – Oils and Fats (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so students will understand what is expected.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • peer to take notes
    • printed copy of slide presentation

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Students will prepare an Oils or Fats recipe following all safety guidelines in the allotted amount of time.

    Groups will set their tables according to the recipe chosen and practice etiquette and table service.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • extended time for assignments
    • check for understanding

  • Lesson Closure

    Review lesson objectives, terms, and definitions.

    Question and Answer Review

    Ask the students to recall learned information from the following questions:

    • Why do we need fats in our diet?
    • What is LDL? Is it good or bad?
    • What is HDL? Is it good or bad?
    • What can too much saturated fat cause?
    • Are unsaturated fats liquid or solid?
    • Why do food producers like to use trans fats in their products?

    Students may refer to their notes for review.

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Students will be assessed with an appropriate rubric.

    Students will also have the opportunity to evaluate the Oils or Fats lab for flavor, ease of preparation, and presentation.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • encourage participation
    • assist in lab procedures

  • References/Resources

    Textbook:

    • Duyff, R. L. (2010). Food, nutrition & wellness. Columbus, OH: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
    • Kowtaluk, H. (2010). Food for today. Columbus, OH: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
    • Weixel, S., & Wempen, F. (2010). Food & nutrition and you. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson/Prentice Hall.

    Website:

  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Recommended Strategies

    Reading Strategies

    Encourage your students to read about low-fat cooking tips at About.com – Low Fat Cooking:

    Encourage students to “visualize” as they read. Many students are visual learners and will benefit from making sketches or diagrams on scrap paper as they read. Providing students with graphic organizers to help them organize their thoughts is also helpful.

  • Quotes

    Foods high in bad fats, sugar and chemicals are directly linked to many negative emotions, whereas whole, natural foods rich in nutrients – foods such as fruits, vegetables, grains and legumes – contribute to greater energy and positive emotions.
    _Marilu Henner

    I use a lot of spices, fresh veggies and fruit, extra virgin olive oil, nuts, avocado, soybeans and organic ingredients as often as possible. We need fat in our diets and using the healthier fats is key.
    -Todd English

    When you go to the grocery store, you find that the cheapest calories are the ones that are going to make you the fattest – the added sugars and fats in processed foods.
    -Michael Pollan

    Stock up your pantry and your freezer with things that aren’t perishable: Your favorite jar of tomato sauce that lists ‘tomato’ as the first ingredient, lots of grains, olive oils, vinegars, tomato pastes, onions, shallots. When you go to the store, you only have to pick up meats and produce.
    -Giada De Laurentiis

  • Multimedia/Visual Strategies

    PowerPoint™:

    • Fats
    • Presentation Notes – Fats

    Technology:

    • TED Talks:
      • What is fat? – George Zaidan
        As the narrative goes, fat is bad. Well, it’s actually more nuanced than that. The type of fat you eat is more impactful on your health than the quantity. George Zaidan examines triglycerides, the varied molecules that make up fat, and how to identify which types of fat you are consuming.
        http://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-is-fat-george-zaidan

    Files for downloading:

  • Graphic Organizers/Handout

    Graphic Organizers:

    • ChooseMyPlate – Oils
    • ChooseMyPlate – Oils (Key)
    • Fats
    • Fats (Key)

    Handouts:

    • Build a Healthy Meal
    • Rubric for Laboratory Experience – Oils or Fats
    • Substitutions for Healthier Cooking and Baking

    Cookbooks:

    • Fast and Easy Recipes
    • Healthy Recipes

    Files for downloading:

  • Writing Strategies

    Journal Entries:

    I encourage my family to drink 1% milk now because ………..
    My favorite low fat treat is ________ because ……..

    Writing Strategies:

    • RAFT Writing Strategy
      • Role – student
      • Audience – school dietitian
      • Format – letter
      • Topic – to improve low fat cafeteria food flavor
  • Communication 90 Second Speech Topics

    Three benefits of eating low fat foods daily are ……..
    School cafeteria should offer flavorful low fat versions of food daily because ……

  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    If budget allows:

    Low Fat Cooking Contest

    • Allow students to choose one regular recipe and substitute the oil or fat in the recipe with alternatives. Invite school personal to judge the best recipe for flavor, calories, and use of substitutions.
      Winner’s recipes may be showcased on school website, media, and newsletter.

    Infographic:

    Infographics are graphic visual representations of information, data or knowledge intended to present complex information quickly and clearly.

    The infographic below is related to this lesson. Allow students to view the image on a projector and lead a discussion concerning the information provided.

    TED Talks:

    TED-Ed’s commitment to creating lessons worth sharing is an extension of TED’s mission of spreading great ideas. This allows users to take any useful educational video, not just TED’s, and easily create a customized lesson around the video.
    The video below is related to this lesson. Allow students to view the video and lead a discussion concerning the TED Talk.

    • What is fat? – George Zaidan
      As the narrative goes, fat is bad. Well, it’s actually more nuanced than that. The type of fat you eat is more impactful on your health than the quantity. George Zaidan examines triglycerides, the varied molecules that make up fat, and how to identify which types of fat you are consuming.
      http://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-is-fat-george-zaidan
  • Family/Community Connection

    Invite the school food service dietitian to speak to the class about the new nutrition rules for school breakfasts and lunches. They will understand that schools must follow rigid rules for the food programs to receive federal funding.

  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career, and Community Leaders of America

    http://www.texasfccla.org

    • Star Event:
      Nutrition and Wellness – An individual event, recognizes participants who track food intake and physical activity for themselves, their family, or a community group and determine goals and strategies for improving their overall health.
  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to lesson. For additional information on service learning see http://www.servicelearning.org

    Example:

    Students may work with the school food service dietitian to produce more flavorful meals to serve to students.