Child Abuse Prevention

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Human Services

    Course : Principles of Human Services

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (4) The student demonstrates the skills necessary to enhance personal and career effectiveness in early childhood development and services. The student is expected to:
      • (D) investigate causes, preventions and treatment of child abuse
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • distinguish between the various types of abuse and neglect
    • determine steps for reporting abuse and neglect
    • become aware of the risk factors for child abuse and neglect
    • analyze ways of breaking the cycle of abuse
    • create a three dimensional diorama to include strategies to prevent child abuse
  • Rationale

    Child abuse is non-accidental physical or mental injury, sexual abuse, negligent treatment, or maltreatment of a child under the age of 18. Parents and child caregivers should be alert to signs and symptoms of abuse and neglect. Child care workers should be informed about abuse laws and reporting laws and how these laws affect centers and caregivers who work there.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Four 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Abandonment: It is now defined in many states as a form of neglect. In general, a child is considered to be abandoned when the parent’s identity or whereabouts are unknown, the child has been left alone in circumstances where the child suffers serious harm, or the parent has failed to maintain contact with the child or provide reasonable support for a specified period of time

    Child abuse: Any physical or mental threat or injury to a child under the age of 18

    Emotional abuse: It is a pattern of behavior that impairs a child’s emotional development or sense of self-worth. It is also called psychological abuse

    Maltreatment: To treat in a rough or cruel way; abuse

    Neglect: It is the failure of a parent, guardian, or other caregiver to provide for a child’s basic needs

    Physical abuse: It is non-accidental physical injury (ranging from minor bruises to severe fractures or death) as a result of punching, beating, kicking, biting, shaking, throwing, stabbing, choking, hitting (with a hand, stick, strap, or other object), burning, or otherwise harming a child, that is inflicted by a parent, caregiver, or other person who has responsibility for the child

    Sexual abuse: It includes activities by a parent or caregiver such as fondling a child’s genitals, penetration, incest, rape, sodomy, indecent exposure, and exploitation through prostitution or the production of pornographic materials

    Substance abuse: It is an element of the definition of child abuse or neglect in many states. Circumstances that are considered abuse or neglect in some states include prenatal exposure of a child to harm due to the mother’s use of an illegal drug or other substance. It can also include the manufacture of methamphetamine in the presence of a child

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for PowerPoint™ presentation
    • computers with Internet access (be sure to follow district guidelines for Internet access)
    • presenter remote

    Materials:

    Supplies:

    • cardstock paper
    • glue or glue sticks
    • magazines (to cut out pictures)
    • poster board
    • scissors

    Other appropriate lessons

    Strategies to Deter Child Abuse
    Child Guidance
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/strategies-to-deter-child-abuse/

    The Hidden Epidemic
    Child Development
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/the-hidden-epidemic/

    __

    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Anticipatory Set

    Prior to lesson:

    Note to teacher: Become familiar with how to construct a diorama at:
    http://snapguide.com/guides/make-a-four-door-diorama/

    Print the Child Abuse Statistics cards (see All Lesson Attachments tab) on cardstock. Cut them apart and place in a container. Please check sites for updates on statistics or for additional information at:

    Print copies of Note Taking Template (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handouts to be used during Direct Instruction. Best when printed in front and back format.

    Before class begins:

    Display as many of the lesson-related supplies (see Materials or Specialized Equipment Needed) that you have available on a table in front of the room.

    As the students walk into the classroom, have them draw one card from the container and instruct them to read it to themselves and be prepared to read it aloud. After all the students have received a card, you may elect to place the students in a circle or remain at their desks. Students will take turns reading their Child Abuse Statistics card.

    • After listening to the statistics on child abuse, what are your views on child abuse? Have your views changed?
    • How can abused and neglected children be protected?
    • How does child protective services handle children who are in dangerous situations?
    • What signs might indicate that a child has been physically abused?
    • What are two examples of physical abuse? Emotional abuse? Sexual abuse?
    • To whom should a teacher or caregiver report a suspected case of child abuse?

    Note to Teacher:

    Abuse may be a sensitive topic for some students in your class. Students may be experiencing family problems related to this subject area. They may have a friend or family member who has been affected by abuse. It is important to demonstrate sensitivity to students while teaching this lesson. Child abuse education can break the cycle of abuse. As an educator, you must report any suspected or admission of abuse to the authorities. See an administrator for specific school policy.

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce lesson objectives, terms, and definitions.

    Distribute True or False: Child Abuse Prevention (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout prior to viewing the PowerPoint™. Students will read each statement and place a true or false answer on the before (left hand) column of the handout. After they have answered each statement, students are to put the handout away for later use during lesson closure.

    Distribute handout Note Taking Template (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Students will be expected to take notes while viewing the slide presentation. Teacher to determine the notes which will be recorded by students.

    Introduce PowerPoint™ Child Abuse Prevention (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and begin the discussion with students. Allow for questions and answers to check for understanding.

    Use appropriate notes from Presentation Notes for Child Abuse Prevention (see All Lesson Attachments tab) for discussion.

    After viewing the slide presentation, the students will work together with a partner to complete page four of the Note Taking Template handout. They will have an opportunity to reflect, review, and respond to the information pertaining to the PowerPoint™. They will write a summary of questions, topics or statements which reflect the information from the lesson:

    • Discuss the topic
    • Write down your thoughts
    • Make a real-world connection to the lesson
    • How is this going to help you in the future?

    Allow for questions and answers to check for understanding.

    YouTube™ videos included in the PowerPoint™:

    • Help for Parents. Hope for Kids
      It’s not easy being a parent. But recognizing that you have room for improvement is the first step toward becoming a better parent. Here you will learn where to find the help you need to begin your journey toward becoming a healthier, happier family.
      http://www.helpandhope.org/videos.html

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • checking for understanding
    • providing a copy of slide presentation

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Distribute Responding to Child Abuse and Neglect (see All Lesson Attachments tab). In groups of four, students will research the steps for reporting a case of child abuse to authorities and the procedures that are taken to handle the abuse.

    Allow for questions and class discussion. Check for understanding.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • allowing note-taker helper additional time
    • using cue cards for steps of task
    • using study guides
    • providing study skills instruction

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Prior to activity:

    Place students in groups of four

    Distribute Child Abuse Prevention Diorama (see All Lesson Attachments tab).

    In groups, students will create a three dimensional diorama using a poster board. Create a student learning center to exhibit strategies to prevent child abuse and facts about child abuse. Teacher will assign the topic to be researched by each group:

    • physical abuse
    • emotional abuse
    • sexual abuse
    • abandonment
    • substance abuse
    • neglect

    Students will research one type of abuse and prepare a written report on child abuse. The center and written report will include:

    • distinguish the various type of abuse and neglect
    • determine warning signs for each type of abuse and neglect
    • how to become aware of the risk factors for child abuse and neglect
    • analyze ways of breaking the cycle of abuse

    Distribute Child Abuse Prevention Diorama Rubric (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that students may understand what is expected.

    Distribute Hotlines and Online Resources (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout for students to use as a reference.

    Students will be provided with time to complete their projects. Provide guidance as needed. Allow students to proofread and edit each other’s work and practice the oral component of their projects before class presentations.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • allow extended time for writing assignments
    • provide more time for practice of certain tasks
    • provide computers for writing tasks
    • use other students to help read information

  • Lesson Closure

    Review lesson objectives, terms, and definitions.

    Students will retrieve True or False: Child Abuse Prevention handout they completed at the beginning of Direct Instruction. Students are to respond to the statements again in the after (right hand) column. As a class, compare the two sets of answers.

    Allow for questions and class discussion. Check for understanding.

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Team presentations will be assessed with previously provided rubric and personal reflection assignment.

    Students will each write a one page personal reflection on what they learned from this lesson and how they plan to use the information now and in the future.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • tape record lectures
    • break difficult tasks into smaller parts; teach each part separately if needed
    • provide student with optional quiet spot (possibly isolated) to do academic work or to avoid punishment
    • provide frequent teacher/student contacts to help student start and remain on task

  • References/Resources

    Images:

    • Microsoft Clip Art: Used with permission from Microsoft.

    Textbook:

    • Brisbane, H. (2010). The developing child. Columbus, OH: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
    • Johnson, L. (n.d.). Strengthening family & self. 6th ed.

    YouTube™:

    • Help for Parents. Hope for Kids
      It’s not easy being a parent. But recognizing that you have room for improvement is the first step toward becoming a better parent. Here you will learn where to find the help you need to begin your journey toward becoming a healthier, happier family.
      http://www.helpandhope.org/videos.html

    Websites:

    • Child Abuse Awareness
      Founded in 1959 by Sara O’Meara and Yvonne Fedderson, Childhelp® is a leading national non-profit organization dedicated to helping victims of child abuse and neglect. Childhelp’s approach focuses on prevention, intervention and treatment.
      http://www.childhelp.org
    • Prevent Child Abuse America
      Since 1972, Prevent Child Abuse America (PCA America) has led the way in building awareness, providing education and inspiring hope to everyone involved in the effort to prevent the abuse and neglect of our nation’s children.
      http://www.preventchildabuse.org/index.shtml
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services resources – National Child Abuse Prevention Month (April) information.
      Child Welfare Information Gateway connects child welfare and related professionals to comprehensive information and resources to help protect children and strengthen families.
      http://www.childwelfare.gov/
  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • Ask students to repeat your instructions back to you to be sure they know what is expected of them before each phase of the lesson.
    • Discuss vocabulary in detail and make sure everyone has a firm grasp on it before moving forward with the lesson.
    • Use graphic organizers and visuals to explain the lesson in detail.
    • Print fill in the blank handouts of the PowerPoint™ notes for students to follow along with the lesson.
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Recommended Strategies

    Reading Strategies

    Current Events:
    Assign students to read about child abuse prevention. Information can be found in newspaper articles, magazines, journals, and online print.
    Suggestions:

    • Check the web site of the National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education for safety tips for child care centers.
      http://nrckids.org/
    • Encourage students to connect reading to their life experiences or prior knowledge
  • Quotes

    A statue stands in a shaded place. An angel girl with an upturned face. A name is written on a polished rock. A broken heart that the world forgot.
    -Martina Mcbride

    Let us be the ones who say we do not accept that a child dies every three seconds simply because he does not have the drugs you and I have. Let us be the ones to say we are not satisfied that your place of birth determines your right for life. Let us be outraged, let us be loud, let us be bold.
    -Brad Pitt

    Faith is why I’m here today and faith is why I made it through.
    -Jonathan Anthony Burkett Neglected But Undefeated: The Life Of A Boy Who Never Knew A Mother’s Love

    It is important for people to know that no matter what lies in their past, they can overcome the dark side and press on to a brighter world.
    -Dave Pelzer, A Child Called “It”

  • Multimedia/Visual Strategies

    PowerPoint™:

    • Child Abuse Prevention
    • Presentation Notes for Child Abuse Prevention

    YouTube™:

    • Help for Parents. Hope for Kids
      It’s not easy being a parent. But recognizing that you have room for improvement is the first step toward becoming a better parent. Here you will learn where to find the help you need to begin your journey toward becoming a healthier, happier family.
      http://www.helpandhope.org/videos.html

    Files for downloading:

  • Graphic Organizers/Handout

    Graphic Organizers:

    • Note Taking Template

    Handouts:

    • Child Abuse Prevention Diorama
    • Child Abuse Prevention Diorama Rubric
    • Child Abuse Statistics
    • Hotlines and Online Resources
    • Child Maltreatment: Facts at a Glance
    • Responding to Child Abuse and Neglect
    • True or False: Child Abuse Prevention
    • True or False: Child Abuse Prevention (Key)

    Files for downloading:

  • Writing Strategies

    Journal Entries:

    • Some signs that might indicate that a child has been physically abused are___________.
    • Two examples of physical abuse are _____________.
    • Two examples of emotional neglect are______________.
    • What I can do if I suspect child abuse is _____________.
    • List and describe three sources of help for abuse victims.

    Writing Strategies:

    RAFT Writing Strategy
    Role – Parent
    Audience – Child
    Format – Letter
    Topic – Need for Positive Parenting Skills

  • Communication 90 Second Speech Topics

    • Several signs that might indicate that a child has been abused are__________________.
    • Some feelings which often accompany abusive behavior are___________.
    • Some factors associated with abuse are classified by__________________.
  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    • Develop an infographic educating others of the types and warning signs of abuse. Include positive ways to break the cycle of abuse.
    • Research resources available in your community using the newspaper, Internet, interviews, or other ways of locating social services and organizations that help children. Find out what services are offered, what qualifications recipients must meet, what the cost is, and how the services and organizations receive funds. Choose one resource you think is particularly beneficial to children. Thoroughly research the resource and write a report.
    • Children’s Bureau Timeline
      Use this interactive timeline to explore the Children’s Bureau’s rich history, decade by decade. Learn about the key political and social events that influenced the development of today’s Children’s Bureau and shaped the evolution of child welfare in America.
      https://cb100.acf.hhs.gov/childrens-bureau-timeline

    Multiple Choice Social Studies Assessment Questions Principles of Human Services

    Children were protected from working full-time jobs on farms, in factories, or in businesses after passing:
    a. an amendment to the Constitution of the United States
    b. immigration laws
    c. child labor laws
    d. unions

    Answer: C

    One outcome of the laws against child labor in the late nineteenth century was:
    a. all children were required to attend public school
    b. poor children were forced to do piecework at home
    c. children spent more time away from their parents than when they had been working
    d. working class parents were obliged to find childcare

    Answer: A

  • Family/Community Connection

    Help for Parents. Hope for Kids
    http://helpandhope.org/preventing-child-abuse.html

    • Building a Strong Community
      • Get to know your neighbors
      • Develop friendly relationships with your neighbors and their children and grandchildren
      • Make your neighborhood your extended family. People feel better and safer when support is nearby
      • Help out a family under stress
      • Offer to babysit, help with chores, or run errands
      • Suggest resources in the community such as faith community leaders, doctors, and teachers
  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)

    http://www.fcclainc.org

    FCCLA Family First Project – http://www.fcclainc.org/content/families-first/

    The FCCLA Families First project is a national peer education program through which youth gain a better understanding of how families work and learn skills to become strong family members. Its goals are to help youth become strong family members and leaders for today and tomorrow and strengthen the family as the basic unit of society. To help members focus their projects, Families First offers five units. Members may complete projects in one or several units. There is no particular order to them; although, “Families Today” might be a good place to start. It covers topics that provide a general overview of families and related issues:
    Families Today: Understand and celebrate families
    You-Me-Us: Strengthen family relationships
    Meet the Challenge: Overcome obstacles together
    Balancing Family and Career: Manage multiple responsibilities
    Parent Practice: Learn to nurture children

  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to lesson.
    http://www.nylc.org/

    Classroom project can be expanded to create community awareness of child abuse and neglect. Create teams and assign duties to complete the selected project. Example: Students develop, print and distribute flyers to local child daycare centers to raise child abuse awareness. Steps may include researching day cares in the area; contacting managers/owners of the facilities and making arrangements to distribute the flyers.

    Statewide volunteer networks support the work of children’s advocacy centers and child welfare boards. Plus, many communities have volunteer referral services that can connect you to a meaningful and rewarding volunteer experience. Call 2-1-1 or your local United Way office to offer to help families in need or work to prevent child abuse. You can also visit the volunteer center in your area, which matches volunteers with community needs.

    Students will reflect on how the experience, knowledge, and skills they acquired related to their project, their own lives, and their community.

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