Careers in the Restaurant Industry: Connecting Education and Employment

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Hospitality and Tourism

    Course : Restaurant Management

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (1) The student gains academic knowledge and skills required to pursue the full range of career and postsecondary education opportunities within the restaurant industry. The student is expected to:
      • (A) organize oral and written information
    • (2) The student uses verbal and nonverbal communication skills to create, express, and interpret information for providing a positive experience for guests and employees. The student is expected to:
      • (A) develop, deliver, and critique presentations
      • (E) apply active listening skills to obtain and clarify information
    • (4) The student uses information technology tools specific to restaurant management to access, manage, integrate, and create information. The student is expected to:
      • (E) evaluate internet resources for information
    • (5) The student understands roles within teams, work units, departments, organizations, and the larger environment of the restaurant industry. The student is expected to:
      • (A) explain the different types and functions of departments
    • (9) The student demonstrates an understanding that personal success depends on personal effort. The student is expected to:
      • (E) follow directions and procedures independently
    • (10) The student develops principles in time management, decision making, effective communication, and prioritizing. The student is expected to:
      • (B) analyze various steps in the career decision-making process
    • (11) The student knows and understands the importance of employability skills. The students is expected to:
      • (A) demonstrate skills related to seeking employment in the restaurant industry
      • (B) identify the required training and educational requirements that lead toward an appropriate industry certification
      • (C) select educational and work history highlights to include in a career portfolio
      • (D) update a personal career portfolio
      • (E) complete required employment forms such as I-9, work visa, W-4, and licensures to meet employment requirements
      • (F) research the local and regional labor workforce market to determine opportunities for advancement
      • (G) investigate professional development training opportunities to keep current on relevant trends and information within the industry
      • (H) explore entrepreneurship opportunities
    • (12) The student understands the use of technical knowledge and skill required to pursue careers in the restaurant industry, including knowledge of design, operation, and maintenance of technological systems. The student is expected to:
      • (A) define job-specific technical vocabulary
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • outline education opportunities available after high school graduation
    • investigate employment opportunities in the restaurant industry
    • explore advantages and disadvantages of employment in food service careers
    • assess salaries, duties, work environment and job outlook for employment
    • evaluate safety tips, hazards and solutions with an interactive web-based training tool
    • complete an employment application, an I-9 and W-4 form
  • Rationale

    Script:

    (Updated 12/12/2013) Whether eating out or buying carry-out, Americans are consuming more and more of their calories from full-service and fast-food restaurants. What type of personality does it take to work in a restaurant? Are you interested in a career in the restaurant industry? This lesson will provide you with an opportunity to learn about the types of skills and training needed to seek employment in this career field. Let’s get started!

  • Duration of Lesson

    Five 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Abilities: The quality of being able to do something, especially the physical, mental, financial, or legal power to accomplish something

    Apprenticeship: One bound by legal agreement to work for another for a specific amount of time in return for instruction in a trade, art or business

    I-9 form: The Employment Eligibility Verification is a United States Citizenship and Immigration Services form. It is used by an employer to verify an employee’s identity and to establish that the worker is eligible to accept employment in the United States

    Job application: Is an application for employment used by companies to hire employees

    Job Training: Training involving both on-the-job experience and informal training with experienced workers

    Organization skills: Strategies used to organize oneself

    Professional references: References from individuals who can attest to your skills, qualifications and abilities. Professional references can include managers, colleagues, clients, business contacts and others who can recommend you for employment

    Related experiences: Previous work-related skill, knowledge or experience is required for occupations

    Skills: Talent and expertise a person possesses to perform a certain job or task

    Tasks: A piece of work assigned or done as part of one’s duties

    Work activities: Descriptions of activities associated with specific business requirements that users perform to accomplish their jobs

    W-4 form: IRS tax form used by taxpayers and tax-exempt organizations to report financial information to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) of the United States. They are used to report income and calculate taxes to be paid to the federal government of the United States

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for multimedia presentation
    • computers with Internet access (be sure to follow district guidelines for Internet access)
    • light projector (Elmo)
    • presenter/remote

    Materials:

    • chef jacket
    • policy handbook (use school handbook for an example)
    • sample menus from local dining establishments
    • server’s apron (short black apron with pockets)
    • tableware
    • ticket book
    • tie (representing manager)

    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Anticipatory Set

    Before class begins:

    Note to teacher – Become familiar with:

    • The Occupational Outlook Handbook Teacher’s Guide to assist the students with their career search.
      http://www.bls.gov/ooh/About/Teachers-Guide.htm
    • Young Worker Safety in Restaurants ETool
      Restaurants and other eating and drinking businesses employ 11.6 million people in the United States. Nearly 30% of these employees are under 20 years of age. Many young workers’ first work experience is in the restaurant industry. OSHA is providing this eTool to help young workers in the restaurant industry be safe and healthy on the job.
      This eTool describes common hazards and potential safety solutions for teen workers and employers in the restaurant industry.
      http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/youth/restaurant/index.html
    • Quizzes – Puzzle Game
      After students have read all of the restaurant modules they are ready to take the quizzes and play the Restaurant Safety Puzzle Game!
      They will receive a puzzle piece for each quiz finished correctly. If they finish all the quizzes, the puzzle will be complete and they may print a completion certificate. If you close the puzzle board you will lose your puzzle pieces and will need to start over.

    A paper copy of the Restaurant Safety Quizzes (see All Attachments tab) is available. For the answer key, follow this link: http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/youth/restaurant/quizzes.html

    Gather materials and place on a table for students to observe as they enter the classroom.

    When students are seated, have them brainstorm answers to the following questions. Assign a student scribe to record all answers on the board or chart tablet.

    • Have you considered a career in the restaurant industry?
    • How do you think Ray Kroc, founder of McDonalds, got started?
    • Would you like to work at a large chain restaurant or a small local venue?
    • How much money do you think restaurant managers make?
    • What are some advantages to careers in the restaurant industry?
    • What are some disadvantages to careers in the restaurant industry?
    • Would you like to own your own food business?
  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Distribute the graphic organizer Restaurant Industry Careers (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that students may take notes during the slide presentation.

    Introduce PowerPoint™ Careers in the Restaurant Industry: Connecting Education and Employment (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Allow time for questions and class discussion.

    Stress the need for continued training opportunities throughout one’s career.

    View the YouTube™ videos:

    • Gordon Ramsay’s Restaurant Tips
      Gordon gives us his top five tips for running a restaurant.
      http://youtu.be/n3jHA8sH-N0
    • 2012 Faces of Diversity – Bahjat Shariff 
      The National Restaurant Association’s Faces of Diversity awards program celebrates restaurants and industry professionals who contribute to and embrace the diversity that makes the restaurant industry so successful. Meet Bahjat Shariff, Senior Vice President of Operations and Operating Partner for Panera Bread/Howley Bread Group in Cumberland, R.I. – winner of the 2012 Faces of Diversity American Dream Award.
      http://youtu.be/C_vhnG10AfU

    Distribute graphic organizer Education and Training in the Restaurant Industry (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and allow the students to outline their plans for continued preparation towards their careers.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • checking for understanding
    • peer assistance with notetaking
    • providing printed PowerPoint™ notes
    • extra time to take notes

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Young Worker Safety in Restaurants ETool. Explain to the students that restaurants and other eating and drinking businesses employ 11.6 million people in the United States. Nearly 30% of these employees are under 20 years of age. Many young workers’ first work experience is in the restaurant industry. OSHA is providing this eTool to help young workers in the restaurant industry be safe and healthy on the job.
    The eTool describes common hazards and potential safety solutions for teen workers and employers in the restaurant industry.
    http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/youth/restaurant/index.html

    Quizzes – Puzzle Game

    After students have read all of the restaurant modules they are ready to take the quizzes and play the Restaurant Safety Puzzle Game!
    They will receive a puzzle piece for each quiz finished correctly. If they finish all the quizzes, the puzzle will be complete and they may print a completion certificate. If you close the puzzle board you will lose your puzzle pieces and will need to start over.

    Stress the importance of having this type of documentation in their professional portfolio.

    Distribute copies of the Employment Application, W-4 and I-9 (see All Lesson Attachments tab) employment forms to students as they complete their assessment. Inform students of the importance of these three forms before they begin to work. Instruct them in filling in the information.

    If available, use the light projector (Elmo) to guide students and encourage them to use their best handwriting and to avoid errors. Also, advise the students that the application needs to be completed and signed with their signature to be a legal application. Assist students with any parts of the application that they may find difficult.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • allow extra time needed to complete handwritten sample job application
    • assisting student in gathering information
    • provide praise and encouragement
    • grade according to work done

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Divide students into subgroups of three. Introduce the scenario:

    You and your coworkers have been selected to investigate careers in the food industry. Work together as a team to research information needed to share with the class.

    Place Occupational Outlook Handbook Flashcards (see All Lesson Attachments tab) in a basket and ask one member from each group to select a card with a career they will research and present to the class.

    Distribute the Rubric for PowerPoint™ Presentation and Rubric for Multimedia Prezi™ Presentation (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so students understand what is expected.

    Distribute graphic organizer Pros and Cons of Employment Opportunities (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Students should read through their selected career option and determine a minimum of eight advantages and eight disadvantages.

    Introduce and guide students through the website components of the Occupational Outlook Handbook
    http://bls.gov/ooh/

    Students will locate the selected career and gather information for their the multimedia presentation. The following information should be included:

    • Definition and duties
    • Work environment
    • Education requirements
    • Pay
    • Job outlook
    • Job prospects
    • Similar occupations
    • Contacts

    Students should include a short video on their selected career in the presentation from the Career One Stop website:
    Pathways to Career Success
    Career Videos for Hospitality and Tourism
    http://www.acinet.org/videos_by_cluster.asp?id=&nodeid=28&cluster=9

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • check for understanding
    • allowing extended time for typing resume
    • extending possible tutoring time before and after school
    • allowing time at home if a computer is available

  • Lesson Closure

    Review lesson plan objectives, terms and definitions.

    Refer to the following article and discuss with students if they possess the skills needed to work in a restaurant.


    At the end of each class period, individual teams will be provided with an opportunity to share the pros and cons of their selected career with the class.

    Questions:
    “Would the challenges (cons) you discovered deter you from pursuing this career?”
    “Would the benefits (pros) you discovered encourage you to pursue this career?”

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Teams will present their multimedia presentations. Allow time for student questions and class discussion after each presentation.

    Student projects/presentations will be assessed with appropriate rubric.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • allowing assistance in typing final resume
    • allow extra time for turning in resume

  • References/Resources

    Article:

    Textbooks:

    • Culinary essentials. (2010). Woodland Hills, CA: Glenco/McGraw Hill.
    • Foundations of restaurant management & culinary arts: Level one. (2011). Boston, MA: Preston Hall.

    Websites:

    • Teacher’s Guide: Occupational Outlook Handbook
      By familiarizing yourself with the new features of the reinvented OOH, you will be in a position to quickly and effectively help your students use this valuable tool.
      http://www.bls.gov/ooh/About/Teachers-Guide.htm
    • Young Worker Safety in Restaurants ETool Restaurants and other eating and drinking businesses employ 11.6 million people in the United States. Nearly 30% of these employees are under 20 years of age. Many young workers’ first work experience is in the restaurant industry. OSHA is providing this eTool to help young workers in the restaurant industry be safe and healthy on the job. This eTool describes common hazards and potential safety solutions for teen workers and employers in the restaurant industry.
      http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/youth/restaurant/index.html
    • U.S. Citizen and Immigration Services
      Federal law requires every employer and agricultural recruiter/referrer-for-a-fee hiring an individual for employment in the United States to verify his or her identity and employment authorization through completion of Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification.
      http://www.uscis.gov/files/form/i-9.pdf

    Videos:

    YouTube™:

    • 2012 Faces of Diversity – Bahjat Shariff  The National Restaurant Association’s Faces of Diversity awards program celebrates restaurants and industry professionals who contribute to and embrace the diversity that makes the restaurant industry so successful. Meet Bahjat Shariff, Senior Vice President of Operations and Operating Partner for Panera Bread/Howley Bread Group in Cumberland, R.I. – winner of the 2012 Faces of Diversity American Dream Award. http://youtu.be/C_vhnG10AfU
  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • word wall
    • picture word wall which gives visual representation
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Recommended Strategies

    Reading Strategies

    Distribute a copy of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Are You a Teen Worker? (see All Lesson Attachments tab) to students to read about safety in the workplace.

    Restaurant Careers
    Explore a variety of positions within the food industry, including kitchen, server, front and back-of-house careers
    http://www.restaurant.org/Restaurant-Careers/Career-Development/Career-Options/Job-Titles

    The “Word Attack” Strategy will be utilized. Advise students prior to reading the article, to skim the article and circle / underline words that are unfamiliar to them. For example, any restaurant acronyms or lingo used in the food industry.

    The students will be encouraged to use http://www.dictionary.com and to check the word wall to help with decoding. This procedure will help them understand the meaning and pronunciation of the words.

  • Quotes

    The difference between a job and a career is the difference between forty and sixty hours a week.
    -Robert Frost

    Choose a job you love and you will never have to work a day in your life.
    -Confucius

    Talents are common, everyone has them – but rare is the courage to follow our talents where they lead.
    -Anon

    People don’t choose their careers; they are engulfed by them.
    -John Dos Passos

    I’m not a TV guy. I’m a restaurant chef and a businessman.
    -Emeril Lagasse

    Your talent determines what you can do. Your motivation determines what you are willing to do. Your attitude determines how well you do it.
    -Lou Holtz

  • Multimedia/Visual Strategies

    Powerpoint™:

    • Careers in the Restaurant Industry: Connecting Education and Employment
    • Presentation Notes – Careers in the Restaurant Industry: Connecting Education and Employment.

    Technology:

    Files for downloading:

  • Graphic Organizers/Handout

    Graphic Organizer:

    • Education and Training in the Restaurant Industry
    • Pros and Cons of Employment Opportunities
    • Restaurant Industry Careers
    • Restaurant Industry Careers (KEY)

    Handouts

    • Are You a Teen Worker?
    • Employment Application
    • Form I-9 Updated
    • Form W-4 (2013)
    • Occupational Outlook Handbook Flashcards
    • Restaurant Safety Quizzes
    • Rubric for Multimedia Prezi™ Presentation
    • Rubric for PowerPoint™ Presentation

    Files for downloading:

  • Writing Strategies

    Journal Entries:

    • I would like to get a restaurant job as a _________ in my _______ (community, city).
    • The type of restaurant I would like to own is. . .
    • It is important to list my skills on an employment application because. . .
    • My favorite restaurant in town is ________ because . . .
    • I would prefer to work in the back of the house, front of the house or in management because . . .

    Writing Strategy:

    • RAFT writing strategy
      • Role: Full Service Restaurant
      • Audience: Applicant
      • Format: Want Ad for an Executive Chef
      • Topic: Job Description/Employee Characteristics and Educational Experience
  • Communication 90 Second Speech Topics

    • Why should I hire you?
    • Why should you hire me?
    • Why repeat business is important for restaurants.
  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    Students can create a bulletin board listing career opportunities and salary information in the restaurant industry for their classmates to view.

    Allow them to use magazine pictures, take home menus, paper plates, plastic utensils and cups to make it three dimensional.

    Infographics:

    Infographics are graphic visual representations of information, data or knowledge intended to present complex information quickly and clearly.

    The infographic below is related to this lesson. Allow students to view the image on a projector and lead a discussion concerning the information provided.

  • Family/Community Connection

    Guest Speaker:

    Make contact and arrange for a guest speaker who is a manager at a local restaurant to discuss what characteristics they look for in a potential employee. You can also contact your local restaurant association to arrange for a guest speaker to talk to your students about the requirements and skills needed for a food service career.

  • CTSO connection

    Family Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)

    http://texasfccla.org

    STAR Events:

    • Career Investigation – An individual event – recognizes participants for their ability to perform self-assessments, research and explore a career, set career goals, create a plan for achieving goals and describe the relationship of Family and Consumer Sciences coursework to the selected career.
    • Job Interview – An individual event – recognizes participants who use Family and Consumer Sciences and / or related occupations skills to develop a portfolio, participate in an interview and communicate a personal understanding of job requirements.

    SkillsUSA

    http://www.skillsusatx.org/

    • Employment Application Process
      Tests the contestant’s readiness in applying for employment and their understanding of the process. The contest is available to students who are classified under the provision of Public Law 105-17, Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, 1997. The competition includes completing an application and interviewing with the judges. Their resume and portfolio are used during their interviews.
    • Restaurant Service (formerly Food and Beverage Service)
      Contestants are tested on skills required in the “front of the house” of a fine restaurant. The focus is on guest service and guest relations in the dining room including: table set up; greeting guests; reservations procedures; presentation of menus; description of food, drinks, soups and specials of the day; taking orders; serving each course and clearing the table after each course; and preparation and presentation of the check and closing remarks. Contestants are judged on personal appearance, tableside manner, professionalism, ease with guests, courtesy, general knowledge and technical and verbal skills.
  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to lesson. For additional information on service learning see:
    http://ysa.org/

    Possible idea:
    Organize a food drive by contacting local restaurants. Students could advertise the event and encourage restaurant owners or managers to give a discount for customers who donate nonperishable food. The donated food would benefit the local food bank in their city or town.

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