Career Preparation, Teamwork and Leadership Skills

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Education and Training

    Course : Human Growth and Development

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (11) The student understands the skills necessary for career preparation. The student is expected to:
      • (A) demonstrate skills, characteristics and responsibilities of leaders and effective team members
      • (B) demonstrate effective methods and obligations for securing, maintaining and terminating employment
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • explain effective ways to secure and maintain a job, the related obligations and the appropriate ways to end employment
    • demonstrate skills, characteristics and responsibilities of effective team members
    • discuss skills, characteristics and responsibilities of effective leaders
    • research an Education and Training career to include education, skills, requirements and duties
    • demonstrate appropriate oral and written communication skills
  • Rationale

    Script:

    Applying for a job is an important step as an educator. Knowing what to expect and preparing for a job interview will help future educators make a good impression. What are the guidelines for the methods and obligations of securing, maintaining and terminating employment? How do collaboration and teamwork benefit individuals? What leadership skills are important at the workplace? Once you understand what will be expected of you in the workplace, you can begin the process of finding employment. The job market is one of the most competitive markets in the world today, so it is important to be well-prepared.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Four 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Background check: The act of reviewing both confidential and public information to investigate a person or entity’s history

    Evaluation: Determination or diagnosis of something; a progress report

    Interview: A formal meeting in which one or more persons question, consult or evaluate another person

    Leader: A person who guides or directs; a person who inspires others

    Minimum requirements: The lowest level of requirements for a position

    Obligation: Something that you must do because of a law, rule or promise

    Personnel policies: Define the treatment, rights, obligations and relations of people in an organization

    Probation: A period of time when the employee, as well as the organization, is on probation; during this time, the employee can leave or be asked to leave without any legal or other implications

    Resignation: The act of giving up a job or position in a formal or official way

    Résumé: A brief summary of personal, educational and professional qualifications and experience

    Soft skills: A cluster of personal qualities, habits, attitudes and social graces that make one a good employee and compatible to work with

    Synergy: The increased effectiveness that results when two or more people or businesses work together

    Supervisor: A person who supervises workers or the work done by others; superintendent

    Team: A number of persons associated together in work or activity

    Termination: The act of making a person leave a job; the act of firing or dismissing someone

    Vision: An inspirational description of what an organization would like to achieve or accomplish in the mid-term or long-term future; serves as a clear guide for choosing current and future courses of action

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for PowerPoint™ presentation
    • computers with Internet access (be sure to follow district guidelines)

    Materials:

    • newspapers with want ads
    • samples of online job applications
    • samples of teacher resources

    Supplies

    • markers
    • notebook paper or index cards
    • poster boards

    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Anticipatory Set

    Prior to class:

    Note to Teacher: More information on career preparation, teamwork and leadership skills can be found in these courses/lessons:

    Service Learning With a Smile: Education and Training (Human Growth and Development)
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/service-learning-with-a-smile-education-and-training/

    A Caregiver’s Responsibilities (Child Guidance)
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/a-caregivers-responsibilities/

    Success
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/lesson-13-success/ (Career Portals: Middle School)

    Résumé Writing for Teens (Career Portals: Middle School)
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/14b-resume-writing-for-teens/

    Job Applications (Career Portals: Middle School)
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/14c-job-applications/

    Maximize Your Job Search with a Career Portfolio (Practicum in Human Services)
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/maximize-your-job-search-with-a-career-portfolio/

    Empowering Your Job Skills (Practicum in Human Services)
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/empowering-your-job-skills-3/

    Become familiar with PowerPoint™, handouts and activities.

    Become familiar with the Occupational Outlook Handbook Teacher’s Guide at
    http://www.bls.gov/ooh/About/Teachers-Guide.htm

    This lesson is divided into several mini-lessons to make it easier to present the information on multiple days. By distributing the information into mini-lessons, it will be easier for students to understand.

    Display as many of the lesson-related supplies (see Materials or Specialized Equipment Needed) as you have available on a table in front of the room.

    Before class begins:

    Give each student ten index cards, or ask students to take out a piece of notebook paper. If they are going to use notebook paper, instruct them to tear the paper into ten horizontal strips. Have students write a word or phrase that describes themselves on each index card or strip of paper (positive or negative). On the board, write these three phrases: “Career Preparation,” “Teamwork” and “Leadership Skills.” In groups of four, ask the students to arrange their index cards or strips of paper under the category that best fits the descriptor. For example, if a student wrote “problem solver,” that would be placed under teamwork. Some words or phrases may fall under all three categories. You may opt to have the students tape their cards or strips of paper on the board.

    Ask the following questions:

    • What qualities or skills do you have to prepare you for the world of work?
    • Why is teamwork so important at a job setting?
    • What teamwork skills do you possess?
    • What leadership skills do you possess?
    • If you wrote a negative word or phrase, how can this prevent you from obtaining and keeping a job? Being a team player? Being a leader?
    • What happens when conflicts occur at a job setting?
    • Boss: What do you think of when you hear this word? Describe characteristics of a boss.
    • Leader: What do you think of when you hear this word? Describe characteristics of a leader.
    • What are the qualities of an effective leader?
  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce lesson, objectives, terms and definitions.

    Distribute the graphic organizer Career Preparation, Teamwork and Leadership Skills Note-Taking (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Students will be expected to take notes while viewing the slide presentation.

    Introduce the PowerPoint™ Career Preparation, Teamwork and Leadership Skills (see All Lesson Attachments tab), and begin a discussion on getting and keeping a job (slides 3 – 21). Allow time for questions and class discussion.

    Use appropriate notes from Presentation Notes for Career Preparation, Teamwork and Leadership Skills (see All Lesson Attachments tab) for discussion.

    See Guided Practice Activity One

    Continue with the slide presentation, and discuss slides 22-28 on being a team player. Continue to use the appropriate notes from Presentation Notes for Career Preparation, Teamwork and Leadership Skills (see All Lesson Attachments tab) for discussion.

    See Guided Practice Activity Two

    Continue with the slide presentation, and discuss slides 29-34 on leadership skills. Continue to use the appropriate notes from Presentation Notes for Career Preparation, Teamwork and Leadership Skills (see All Lesson Attachments tab) for discussion.

    See Guided Practice Activity Three

    Videos included in the PowerPoint™ presentation:

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • providing students with a copy of the notes or a fill-in-the-blank note sheet to follow along with instruction
    • pairing up students with elbow partners who can assist them with verbal and written responses to the lesson

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Guided Practice Activity One

    Distribute the How Would You Answer This? Getting and Keeping a Job (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout. Each student will select a type of job he or she would like to apply for and then answer the questions as he or she would for that job. The students will also list four steps for preparing for a job interview.

    Distribute the Common Interview Questions (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout. Place the students into groups of four. Using the common interview questions, have them role-play an initial interview by taking turns being the employer and the job seeker.

    Allow for questions and discussion. Check for understanding.

    Guided Practice Activity Two

    Divide the students into teams of four. They are to perform a short two-three minute skit or role-play on being a team player. Be sure that each team member is involved. Distribute the Rubric for Skit or Role-Play (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that the students understand what is expected.

    Allow each group time to develop and practice its skit. Each group will perform its skit.

    Check for understanding.

    Distribute the Being a Team Player (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout. In groups of five, students will work as a team to build a structure using random items found in the classroom (tissue box, school supplies, textbooks, ruler and so forth) or things found on their persons. Assign one of the following duties to each team member:

    • Creator – will build the structure
    • Manager – will draw a picture of the structure on paper, labeling its part as necessary
    • Leader – will provide instructions and guidance for how to create the structure and a brief oral presentation describing the structure to the class
    • Builders – will gather the items, disassemble the structure and place the items back in their proper places in the classroom

    Write the following questions on the board. Together, have group members answer the questions on a piece of notebook paper.

    • How did you feel when you were first placed in this group?
    • What communication skills did you use as a team player?
    • What good qualities were exhibited on your team?
    • How can you succeed on a team, even if you don’t like your teammates?

    Each group will present their structure to the class.

    Individually, students will complete the My Performance as a Team Member (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout.

    Allow time for questions and discussion.

    Guided Practice Activity Three

    On the board write, “Think about being a leader.” Distribute the An Effective Leader is… (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout. The students are to circle the words that they think describe an effective leader. Then they are to provide an explanation of why they selected or did not select each word. Use this handout to start a class discussion.

    Lead students to share and discuss their responses. Check for understanding.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • working with a peer tutor
    • participating in a small group/classroom

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Scenario: You are interested in a career as an educator and are going to research the requirements.

    Distribute the Research – Choosing a Career in Education and Training (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout. Each student will research a career in Education and Training he or she might be interested in. Research will include:

    • Determination of where he or she would like to work and live
    • Entry level education requirements
    • Identifying employment trends, job growth and salary options
    • Leadership skills needed for the position
    • Post-secondary education options
    • Qualifications for the position
    • Teamwork skills needed for the position
    • Work environment

    Have students refer to the following website as a resource:

    Distribute the Rubric for Research – Choosing a Career in Education and Training (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that the students understand what is expected.

    Check for understanding.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • providing specific websites or articles from which students can obtain their research information
    • providing students with a checklist or rubric to help them organize and complete all steps of the process

  • Lesson Closure

    Review lesson plan objectives, terms and definitions.

    Distribute the 3-2-1 Lesson Closure (see All Lesson Attachments tab) handout.

    Ask students to share the most important thing that they learned from the lesson.

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Assess student research papers with the appropriate rubric.

    Students will write a one-page reflection of what they have learned from this lesson and how they will apply it to their lives, now and in the future. Content of the reflection may include how planning for a career is a journey and requires continual evaluation and readjustment.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • assisting students with research for assignments
    • modifying assignments if IEP calls for modification
    • giving students copies of slide presentations for study

  • References/Resources

    Images:

    • Microsoft Clip Art: Used with permission from Microsoft.

    Textbooks:

    • Newberry, B. (2010). Life skills for the 21st century: Building a foundation for success. Boston: Prentice Hall.

    Websites:

    • United States Department of Labor
      “Skills to Pay the Bills: Mastering Soft Skills for Workplace Success,” is a curriculum developed by Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) focused on teaching “soft” or workforce readiness skills to youth, including youth with disabilities.
      http://www.dol.gov/odep/topics/youth/softskills/

    YouTube™:

  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • ask students to repeat your instructions back to you to be sure they know what is expected of them before each new phase of the lesson
    • discuss vocabulary in detail and make sure everyone has a firm grasp on it before moving forward with the lesson
    • use graphic organizers and visuals to explain the lesson in detail
    • print fill-in-the-blank handouts of the PowerPoint notes for students to follow along with the lesson
    • provide note-taking assistance using Article Stop and Jot
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    • Write a one-page paper about the following: What’s your best experience as a team member? What’s your worst experience as a team member? Explain.
    • Identify someone you admire as a leader. This person could be of national or local interest or may be someone in your family or community. Write three paragraphs explaining why you look up to him/her as a leader.
    • Allow students to create their own code of ethics for your classroom. This will encourage them to follow their own rules in the classroom. Display the code of ethics in a prominent area to be reviewed during the school year.
    • Have students complete a ticket out with at least one employability workplace skill they are going to need in the 21st century. A ticket out is a half sheet of paper that students are required to fill out in order to leave class. It gives the teacher an idea of how well the students grasped the concept learned in class that day.

    TEDx Talk:

    TED is a nonprofit organization devoted to spreading ideas, usually in the form of short, powerful talks (18 minutes or fewer). The video below is related to this lesson. Allow students to view the video and lead a discussion concerning the TED Talk.

    Simon Sinek: Why good leaders make you feel safe
    What makes a great leader? Management theorist Simon Sinek suggests, it’s someone who makes their employees feel secure, who draws staffers into a circle of trust. But creating trust and safety — especially in an uneven economy — means taking on big responsibility.
    https://www.ted.com/talks/simon_sinek_why_good_leaders_make_you_feel_safe#t-662651

  • Family/Community Connection

    • Have students interview an adult in their lives about that person’s first job. What was it? How did he/she obtain it? What were the joys and challenges? What lessons did he/she learn that helped in the next job or in life in general?
    • As a class, plan to spend a portion of a day volunteering at a non-profit organization, such as Meals on Wheels or the Red Cross. During the next class day, discuss how it felt to be a member of that team. Discuss the challenges and the rewards of the time spent as a team member.
  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)

    http://www.texasfccla.org

    • Career Investigation – An individual event, recognizes participants for their ability to perform self-assessments, research and explore a career, set career goals, create a plan for achieving goals, and describe the relationship of Family and Consumer Sciences coursework to the selected career. Participants must prepare a portfolio and an oral presentation.
    • Chapter Service Project (Display and Manual) – A team event – recognizes chapters that develop and implement an in-depth service project that makes a worthwhile contribution to families, schools and communities. Students must use Family and Consumer Sciences content and skills to address and take action on a community need.
    • Job Interview – An individual event – recognizes participants who use Family and Consumer Sciences and/or related occupations skills to develop a portfolio, participate in an interview and communicate a personal understanding of job requirements.
    • Leadership – An individual event, recognizes participants who actively evaluate and grow in their leadership potential. Participants use the Student Leadership Challenge and supporting materials, to investigate their leadership ability and develop a mentorship relationship to further their leadership development.
  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to the lesson. For additional information on service learning see
    http://www.ysa.org/

    Organize a school-wide or community-wide “Get a Job” day. Have students provide peer counseling concerning interview skills and being an effective team member.

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