Brain Power

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Human Services

    Course : Counseling and Mental Health

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (1) The student applies mathematics, science, English language arts, and social studies in health science. The student is expected to:
      • (B) explain the nervous system of the human body
    • (2) The student demonstrates verbal and nonverbal communication skills. The student is expected to:
      • (A) interpret verbal and nonverbal messages and adapt communication to the needs of the individual
      • (B) demonstrate listening skills and techniques to minimize communication barriers
      • (C) implement communication skills that are responsive rather than reactive
    • (3) The student researches career options and the preparation necessary for employment in mental health. The student is expected to:
      • (A) identify career opportunities related to mental health
      • (E) interpret, transcribe and communicate mental health vocabulary
      • (F) investigate treatment options
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • define vocabulary words associated with the nervous system and the brain
    • identify and label parts of the brain
    • create a diagram of a neuron
    • explain how the brain is imaged
    • examine how brain injuries impact a person’s behavior
  • Rationale

    Script:

    It is important that we develop an awareness of the workings of the human nervous system, particularly the brain. The brain tells every part of the body what to do, how to act and what to feel. It is a key factor in mental health. Research has shown that the brain of mentally ill people varies from the brain of mentally healthy individuals. Understanding the nervous system and brain will provide you with insight on mild to severe mental disorders and disabilities. If you choose a career in the field of Counseling and Mental Health, the information in this lesson will be invaluable.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Five 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Axon: Threadlike structure in the neuron that carries signals away from the cell to other neurons

    Central Nervous System (CNS): Part of the nervous system that consists of brain and spinal cord

    Cerebral Cortex: Gray mass that surrounds the part of brain that controls functions like problem solving

    Dendrites: Branchlike part of neurons that receives impulses from other neurons

    Forebrain: Largest part of brain consisting of left and right hemispheres

    Hindbrain: Part of brain located at base of skull that is involved in basic life processes

    • More vocabulary words can be added to the list.
  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for multimedia presentation
    • computers for Internet access for students

    Materials:

    • brain model (may be borrowed from Health Science Teacher or Anatomy and Physiology Teacher)

    Supplies:

    • chart paper
    • manila folders (one for each student)
    • markers (one for each student)
    • scissors (one for each student)
    • sticky notes (8 to 10 for each student)

    • copies of handout (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Anticipatory Set

    Before class begins:

    Take the opportunity to explore the various referenced websites for further information and activities. Secure a nervous system and brain model from the science or health science department of your school and display in your classroom.
    —-

    Ask students to share what they know about the human nervous system, particularly the brain.

    As a class, allow students to play NEUROJEOPARDY.
    http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/jeopardy.html
    This will definitely raise awareness of what they “do not know about the neurosystem.”

    Distribute Brain Power KWL Chart (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Have students complete the first two sections of the chart. The L section will be filled out during Lesson Closure.
  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce lesson objectives, terms, and definitions.

    Students will develop a personal word wall for lesson vocabulary words. Distribute manila folders and Personal Word Wall instructions (see All Lesson Attachment Tab). Additional words can be added during upcoming slide presentation.

    Introduce PowerPoint™ Brain Power (see All Attachment Lesson tab). Prepare students to take notes.

    Ask students to fold fingers in and put hands together with knuckles touching. Tell them that this is similar to the brain and is approximately the size of their brain.

    Students can also view the media listed below. Links have been added to the slide presentation for your convenience.

    Distribute Brain Imaging graphic organizer (see all Lesson Attachment tab) to record similarities and differences of five brain imaging methods: PET, CAT, EEG, MRI and MEG.

    Above media has been incorporated into the slide presentation.

    Allow time for classroom discussion with questions and answers.

    Allow students to play NEUROJEOPARDY.
    http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/jeopardy.html
    They will definitely see improvement in their knowledge of the human nervous system.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be
    followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • providing extra time to complete assignment
    • checking for understanding
    • paired students

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Allow students to revisit the Personal Word Wall they created during Direct Instruction.

    The website http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/chmodel.html has several lessons and ideas for “making” a neuron model. You may choose an activity from this site or allow students to use the Internet to research and create a basic diagram of a neuron, labeling key parts and explaining it’s purpose.

    Guide students through the Brain Cap Activity from Teacher Enrichment Initiatives of The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio to learn more about brain anatomy,
    http://teachhealthk-12.uthscsa.edu/curriculum/brain/pa03pdf/0301B-Entire.pdf

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • providing specific websites or articles from which students can obtain their research information
    • providing students with a checklist to help them organize and complete activites
    • allowing students to work with a partner

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Distribute Brain Power Project Options and Brain Power Project Rubric (see All Lesson Attachment Tab), Introduce and discuss brain power project options with students and allow them to select a project. Thoroughly discuss rubric components so that students understand how their presentations will be assessed. Students will present findings to the class in an oral presentation.

    Guide and monitor students as they work on their projects.

    Distribute and review Rubric for Brain Power Research Oral Presentation (see All Lesson Attachments tab) prior to the start of the assignment so that students are aware of assessment procedures.

    Optional: Allow students to view and discuss TED Talk Siddharthan Chandran: Can the damaged brain repair itself? (see Enrichment activity)

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • provide specific websites or articles from which students can obtain their information.
    • extended time.
    • students paired with another or work in small groups.

  • Lesson Closure

    Review lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    As a class, allow students to play NEUROJEOPARDY.
    http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/jeopardy.html

    Allow students to complete the L section of the Brain Power KWL Chart and submit for assessment.

    Have students fold a sheet of paper in half, and then in half again, creating four equal sections. Instruct them to label the sections with the following titles: Nervous System, Brain, Imaging and Mental Disorders.

    Using a timer, allow students two minutes per section to write down as much information as they can about each topic.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • encourage participation
    • verbal praise

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Students will present their research. Oral presentation will be assessed with appropriate rubric.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • reduce length of assessment
    • allow to retest if grade is less than passing

  • References/Resources

    Articles:

    Images:

    • “Phineas Gage.” Wikipedia.org. Based on Original Photograph by Jack and Beverly Wilgus., 2 Aug. 2009. Web. 21 Oct. 2012.

    TED Talks:

    • Siddharthan Chandran: Can the damaged brain repair itself?
      After a traumatic brain injury, it sometimes happens that the brain can repair itself, building new brain cells to replace damaged ones. But the repair doesn’t happen quickly enough to allow recovery from degenerative conditions like motor neuron disease (also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease or ALS). Siddharthan Chandran walks through some new techniques using special stem cells that could allow the damaged brain to rebuild faster.
      http://www.ted.com/talks/siddharthan_chandran_can_the_damaged_brain_repair_itself

    Textbooks:

    • Kasschau, R.A. (2002) Understanding Psychology. New York: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill School Publishing Co.

    Websites:

    • Brain Facts
      Learn the basics of how the brain’s 100 billion nerve cells are born, grow, connect, and function. Neuroanatomy; Cell Communication; Brain Development.
      http://www.brainfacts.org
    • Traumatic Brain Injury – TBI & Head Injury Resource
      Traumatic brain injury resource. Brain injury facts, information, symptoms and support. Resources for preventing, treating, and living with brain injury.
      http://www.brainline.org
    • Kids Health
      KidsHealth is the #1 most-trusted source for physician-reviewed information and advice on children’s health and parenting issues. For parents, kids, teens.
      http://kidshealth.org
    • The Secret Life of the Brain – PBS: Public Broadcasting Service
      The Secret Life of the Brain is a co-production of Thirteen/WNET New York and David Grubin Productions. @2001 Educational Broadcasting Corporation.
      http://www.pbs.org/wnet/brain
    • Teacher Enrichment Initiatives – Health Science Curriculum
      The Teacher Enrichment Initiatives (TEI) The Teacher Enrichment Initiatives (TEI) involve partnerships between faculty and staff of the University of Texas Health Science Center
      http://teachhealthk-12.uthscsa.edu
    • Occupational Outlook Handbook : U.S. Bureau of Labor
      Welcome to the Nation’s premier source for career information! The profiles featured cover hundreds of occupations.
      http://www.bls.gov/oco
  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • Word wall
    • Frayer Model
    • Example/Non example
    • Problems/solutions
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Recommended Strategies

    Reading Strategies

    Current Events:
    Assign students to read about the brain. Information can be found in newspaper articles, magazines, journals and online print.
    Suggestions:

    • Magazine cover stories about the brain include:

    “A Thing or Two About Twins,” National Geographic, January, 2012
    “The Neuroscience of Identity,” Scientific American, March, 2012
    “Teenage Brain,” National Geographic, October, 2011
    “The Unlocked Mind,” Discover magazine, March, 2011
    “The Brain’s Dark Energy Brain,” Scientific American, March, 2010
    “Our Mind-Boggling Brain,” American Scholar magazine, Winter 2010
    “Merging Man and Machine,” National Geographic, January, 2010

    • Current Events – students research using the internet, articles about brain research and write a summary using Problem-Solution format (see Attached Lesson Attachments tab).
    • Allow students to research for and select articles about topics discussed in this lesson.
    • Encourage the pre-reading skill of “prediction” as students complete research for their Independent Practice projects. Have them read the titles/subtitles and “predict” what may be contained in the article prior to actually reading. Predictions may be recorded and compared to their actual findings.
  • Quotes

    Brain: an apparatus with which we think we think.
    -Ambrose Bierce

    That’s your best friend and your worst enemy – your own brain.
    -Fred Durst

    Sleep deprivation is the most common brain impairment.
    -William C. Dement

    Any man who reads too much and uses his own brain too little falls into lazy habits of thinking.
    -Albert Einsten

    The brain is like a muscle. When it is in use we feel very good. Understanding is joyous.
    -Carl Sagan

  • Multimedia/Visual Strategies

    PowerPoint™

    • Brain Power PowerPoint™
    • Presentation Notes for Brain Power PowerPoint™

    Technology:

    • Infographic:
      • The History of Madness
        Within this exciting infographic, you will journey back in time to see how people have evolved in their methods of dealing with madness throughout the years, from Ancient Greece and Rome until the 20th century. Follow this illustrated timeline to increase your understanding of how treatments in the mental health field have dramatically changed since antiquity.
        http://www.bestcounselingdegrees.net/madness/
    • TED Talks:
      • Siddharthan Chandran: Can the damaged brain repair itself?
        After a traumatic brain injury, it sometimes happens that the brain can repair itself, building new brain cells to replace damaged ones. But the repair doesn’t happen quickly enough to allow recovery from degenerative conditions like motor neuron disease (also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease or ALS). Siddharthan Chandran walks through some new techniques using special stem cells that could allow the damaged brain to rebuild faster.
        http://www.ted.com/talks/siddharthan_chandran_can_the_damaged_brain_repair_itself

    • Files for downloading:
  • Graphic Organizers/Handout

    Graphic Organizers:

    • Brain Imaging
    • Brain Power KWL Chart

    Handouts:

    • Brain Power Project Options
    • Current Event
    • Personal Word Wall
    • Rubric for Brain Power Research Oral Presentation

    • Files for downloading:
  • Writing Strategies

    Journal Entries:

    • Why is it important to have an understanding of the brain and the nervous system?
    • List three facts that you have learned about the brain and nervous system that you think are important or interesting.
    • What type of nerve disorders are you familiar with?
    • Understanding the nervous system and brain will provide us with _______________.
    • The brain can be imaged by ______________________________.

    Writing Strategy:

    • Students could submit 3 or 4 questions (including answers) that would be included on a test.
  • Communication 90 Second Speech Topics

    Speech Topics:

    • Choose a section of the brain and explain what functions it is responsible for.
    • Why is it important for older people to participate in “brain games”?
    • How do you think your life would change if you suffered from a brain injury?
  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    • Students can use the Internet to find articles relating to brain injury and research and write a summary using Current Event for (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
    • Students can use technology to research careers dealing with brain disorders.
    • Students could research and participate in “brain games.”
    • Research various types of brain injuries and the result of those injuries.
    • See service learning suggestions
    • Extended research of a lesson topic such as brain injury.

    Human Services Counseling and Mental Health Math Assessment Problems

    • (3) The student researches career options and the preparation necessary for employment in mental health. The student is expected to:
      • (E) interpret, transcribe, and communicate mental health vocabulary

    Question 3. Jesse wants to purchase workbooks for each member of the counseling groups he facilitates. The book costs $25 each when bought individually. If he buys more than 10, he can get a 15% discount and free shipping. Not including sales tax, how much
    will it cost to buy 14 books?
    a. $ 21.25
    b. $212.50
    c. $297.50
    d. $358.25

    Answer: C

    TED Talks:

    TED is a nonprofit devoted to spreading ideas, usually in the form of short, powerful talks (18 minutes or less). The video below is related to this lesson. Allow students to view the video and lead a discussion concerning the TED Talk.

    • Siddharthan Chandran: Can the damaged brain repair itself?
      After a traumatic brain injury, it sometimes happens that the brain can repair itself, building new brain cells to replace damaged ones. But the repair doesn’t happen quickly enough to allow recovery from degenerative conditions like motor neuron disease (also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease or ALS). Siddharthan Chandran walks through some new techniques using special stem cells that could allow the damaged brain to rebuild faster.
      http://www.ted.com/talks/siddharthan_chandran_can_the_damaged_brain_repair_itself
  • Family/Community Connection

    Guest speakers:

    • Neurologist
    • Physical therapist who works with brain injuries
    • Family member of brain injury patient
    • Recognize Brain Awareness Week (March 11 – 17). Brain Awareness Week (BAW) is a nationwide effort organized by the Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives and the Society for Neuroscience to promote the public and personal benefits of brain research.
      See: http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/baw.html
  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career, Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)

    http://www.texasfccla.org/

    STAR Events

    • Career Investigation: An individual event – recognizes participants for their ability to perform self-assessments, research and explore a career, set career goals, create a plan for achieving goals, and describe the relationship of Family and Consumer Sciences coursework to the selected career.
    • Illustrated Talk: An individual or team event – recognizes participants who make an oral presentation about issues concerning Family and Consumer Sciences and/or related occupations. Participants use visuals to illustrate content of the presentation.
  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to lesson. For additional information on service learning see
    http://www.nylc.org

    • Students could participate in a service project for a rehabilitation center that specializes in head trauma. Project would depend on the needs of the facility.
    • Students could help raise funds for someone from the community that may have suffered from a brain injury. Person might be a soldier that has returned from the Middle East.

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