Be Our Guest! Customer Service Skills

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Hospitality and Tourism

    Course : Hospitality Services

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (2) The student uses listening, oral, written and media communication skills in creating, expressing and interpreting information and ideas, including technical terminology and information. The student is expected to:
      • (A) interpret verbal and nonverbal communication
      • (B) recognize and respond to guest needs
      • (D) exhibit public relations skills
      • (E) apply alternate communication services to assist customers with specialized needs
    • (3) The student researches career opportunities and qualifications to broaden awareness of careers available in the hospitality industry. The student is expected to:
      • (K) demonstrate appropriate business and personal etiquette
    • (7) The student solves problems using critical-thinking skills independently and in teams. The student is expected to:
      • (C) devise strategies for maximizing customer satisfaction
      • (D) resolve unexpected situations
    • (10) The students uses technological knowledge and skills required to pursue careers in food service. The student is expected to:
      • (C) provide customer service by following appropriate industry standards
    • (12) The student uses technological knowledge and skills required to pursue careers in travel and tourism. The student is expected to:
      • (A) develop technical vocabulary to enhance customer service
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • identify and define vocabulary words used to enhance customer service
    • evaluate why it is important to use a guest’s name
    • discuss and explain what customer service is and why it is important
    • analyze an e-learning course in customer service
    • develop strategies to anticipate guest needs
  • Rationale

    The hospitality industry depends on customers and the success of the business depends on return customers. For this reason, quality customer service is important in the hospitality industry. In this lesson, we will learn how to provide that service and anticipate customer needs. We want them to “Be Our Guest!” So let’s get started!

  • Duration of Lesson

    Four 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Customer: A person who purchases goods or services

    Customer experience: The sum of all experiences a customer has with a supplier of goods and/or services

    Customer loyalty: People choose to use a particular shop or buy one particular product

    Customer service: The total customer experience with that business

    Guest: A customer who purchases products or services from a hospitality business

    Prompt service: Carried out or performed without delay

    Quality service: Service that meets or exceeds customer satisfaction

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for PowerPoint™ presentation
    • computers with Internet access (be sure to follow district guidelines)
    • computer headphones

    Materials:

    • basket
    • cardstock

    Supplies:

    • For the teacher:
      • business suit
      • name tag
      • radio (two-way)

    • copies of all handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Anticipatory Set

    Before class begins:

    Prepare Worst Case/Best Case Guest Scenario Cards (see All Lesson Attachments tab) by printing on cardstock and separating the cards. Place in a basket to be used in the Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience section.

    If you are not familiar with the Texas A & M Agrilife Extension online courses and programs, take a quick tour at:

    It is a free registration for an Extension Online Account.

    Become familiar with the free Customer Service online course at:


    Stand at the door and greet all your students by their last name as they enter the room. Shake their hand, if possible, with a firm handshake, make eye contact and welcome them to the classroom.

    Show the Disney™ video as students enter.

    Distribute the graphic organizer KWL – Customer Service (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and instruct students to answer the first two questions.

    • K – What do you already KNOW about customer service?
    • W – What do you WANT to learn about customer service?

    Ask the following questions:

    • What is customer service and why is it important?
    • Why is it important to always use a guest’s name when addressing them?
    • How did you feel when I used your last name?
    • Why do you think it is important to use the guest’s last name and not his first?
    • What is the big deal about using the guest’s name when you speak to them?
    • What is the name of the department in a large hotel that deals with guest services?

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Distribute the handout and graphic organizer Note-Taking – Be Our Guest! Customer Service Skills and Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs in Hospitality (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that students may take notes during the slide presentation.

    Introduce PowerPoint™ Be Our Guest! Customer Service Skills (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and discuss the importance of quality service when dealing with customers.

    View YouTube™ video:

    Demonstrate the characteristics of the hospitality employee who is focused on guest needs so that students understand the importance of quality service.

    Distribute the handout The Nine Principles of Remarkable Service (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and ask students to review the principles and provide examples for each.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • check for understanding
    • provide a printed copy of the slide presentation

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce students to the Texas A & M Agrilife Extension website and allow them to register for a free account.

    Distribute the graphic organizer ABC’s of Customer Service (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and instruct students to take notes as they listen to the video.

    Students will need headphones for this activity.

    • The ABC’s of Customer Service
      This brief 15-minute video gives an overview of the basics of customer service for anyone who works in an office that accepts visitors, phone calls or e-mails. Taking this online course provides simple reminders to achieve excellent customer service.
      https://extensiononline.tamu.edu/courses/vgyionline.php

    This free online course will reinforce the customer service skills needed in the hospitality industry.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • check for understanding
    • allow extra time for the assignment

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Divide the class into subgroups of two or three students.

    Distribute the graphic organizer Worst Case/Best Case Scenario (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and instruct the students that they should anticipate what the guest needs are before the guest actually needs the item(s).

    Place the Worst Case/Best Case Guest Scenario Cards (see All Lesson Attachments tab) in a basket and allow one member from each group to choose a card.

    Distribute Rubric for Worst Case/Best Case Guest Scenario (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that students will understand what is expected.

    Students should brainstorm worst case and best case strategies and how the guest will be affected by the outcome.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • encourage participation
    • peer tutoring

  • Lesson Closure

    Review lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Distribute the graphic organizer, KWL – Customer Service (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and instruct students to complete the last question.

    • L – What did you LEARN about customer service?
  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Students will present worst case/best case scenarios to the class in a role-play or skit.

    Teachers and students will provide feedback and other possible scenario solutions.

    Students will be assessed with the appropriate rubric.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • check for understanding
    • praise participation

  • References/Resources

    Book:

    • Remarkable service: a guide to winning and keeping customers for servers, managers and restaurant owners. (2009). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.

    Textbooks:

    • Hospitality services reference book. (2001). The Curriculum Center for Family and Consumer Sciences. Lubbock, TX.
    • Reynolds, J. S. (2010). Hospitality services: Food & lodging. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Wilcox Company.

    Website:

    YouTube™ video:

  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • word wall
    • draw visual representations of terms on word wall
    • add terms and definitions to personal dictionary
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Recommended Strategies

    Reading Strategies

    Other articles pertaining to this lesson that students may read include:

    Reading strategy:
    Encourage students to “visualize” as they read. Many students are visual learners and will benefit from making sketches or diagrams on scrap paper as they read. Providing students with graphic organizers to help them organize their thoughts is also helpful.

  • Quotes

    There is only one boss. The customer. And he can fire everybody in the company from the chairman on down, simply by spending his money somewhere else.
    -Sam Walton

    If you make the customer a promise… make sure you deliver it.
    -Merv Griffin

    Right or wrong, the customer is always right.
    -Marshall Field

    Companies are starting to measure how effective their customer service is and trying to understand what they can do to improve the customer service process.
    -Sanjay Kumar

  • Multimedia/Visual Strategies

    PowerPoint™:

    • Be Our Guest! Customer Service Skills
    • Presentation Notes – Be Our Guest! Customer Service Skills – Hospitality Services

    Technology:

    • TED Talks:

    Files for downloading:

  • Graphic Organizers/Handout

    Graphic Organizers:

    • ABC’s of Customer Service
    • ABC’s of Customer Service (Key)
    • KWL – Customer Service
    • Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs in Hospitality
    • Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs in Hospitality (Key)
    • Note-Taking – Be Our Guest! Customer Service Skills

    Handouts:

    • Rubric for Worst Case/Best Case Guest Scenarios
    • The Nine Principles of Remarkable Service
    • Worst Case/Best Case Guest Scenario Cards
    • Worst Case/Best Case Scenario

    Files for downloading:

  • Writing Strategies

    Journal Entries:

    • It is important to use the guest’s last name when speaking with them because …
    • Customer service is important because …
    • The department in a large hotel that deals with guest services is called _______ and they provide …
    • The best service I have received in a hospitality business was …

    Writing Strategy:

    • RAFT Writing Strategy:
      • Role – guest
      • Audience – concierge
      • Topic – securing entertainment tickets
      • Format – email

    Write an email to the hotel concierge requesting tickets to a popular entertainment venue in town.

  • Communication 90 Second Speech Topics

    • Three reasons why it is important to use the customer’s name are …
    • A great customer service experience I have had and why it was a “wow” experience is …
  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    TED Talks:

    TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event.

    The video below is related to this lesson. Allow students to view the video and lead a discussion concerning the TED Talk.


    Students can compile a training manual for the front desk of a hotel on the basic steps to follow to provide great customer service.

    Sections of the training manual may include:

    • general responses to use for customer questions
    • information about the guest to keep for future visits
    • where to locate entertainment tickets

  • Family/Community Connection

    Guest speakers

    Invite hotel personnel to speak to the class about how they strive to satisfy customer requests.

    Speakers may include:

    • concierges
    • food and beverage managers
    • hotel managers
    • rooms division managers

  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career and Community Leaders of America

    http://www.fcclainc.org

    • Hospitality, Tourism and Recreation
      An individual or team event – recognizes participants who demonstrate their knowledge of the hospitality, tourism and recreation industries and ability to translate their knowledge into a hypothetical or real business. Project must relate to culinary, lodging, recreation, tourism or event coordination.
    • Interpersonal Communications
      An individual or team event – recognizes participants who use Family and Consumer Sciences and/or related occupations skills and apply communication techniques to develop a project designed to strengthen communication.

    SkillsUSA

    http://www.skillsusa.org

    • Customer Service Training Program
      Developed with input from SkillsUSA industry partners including Lowe’s, Mosaic, Irwin and Toyota, this new online program trains students on the practical skills required by customer service professionals. In 10 lesson levels, students learn what customer service is, why it is important and what constitutes excellent customer service. Through virtual, simulated scenarios, students test their knowledge and explore the qualities required for exceptional customer service skills in any field service Learning Projects
  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to this lesson.
    www.ysa.org

    Possible ideas:
    Hospitality students may volunteer to provide quality service at a career fair, health fair or other events needing assistance.

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