Back to the Future – An Introduction to Sustainability in Food Service

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
Loading...
FavoriteLoadingAdd to favorites
  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Hospitality and Tourism

    Course : Culinary Arts

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    Culinary Arts

    • (3) The student demonstrates an understanding that personal success depends on personal effort. The student is expected to:
      • (A) demonstrate a proactive understanding of self-responsibility and self-management

    • (4) The student develops principles in time management, decision-making, effective communication and prioritizing. The student is expected to:
      • (B) analyze various steps in the decision-making process
    • (5) The student researches, analyzes and explores lifestyle and career goals. The student examines jobs available in the food service industry and accesses career opportunities. The student is expected to:
      • (E) examine food service related community service opportunities
    • (6) The student understands the history of food service and the use of the professional kitchen. The student is expected to:
      • (D) analyze how current trends in society affect the food service industry
    • (8) The student demonstrates leadership, citizenship and teamwork skills required for success. The student is expected to:
      • (A) apply team-building skills
      • (B) apply decision-making and problem-solving skills
      • (C) determine leadership and teamwork qualities in creating a pleasant working atmosphere
      • (D) participate in community leadership and teamwork opportunities to enhance professional skills

    Practicum in Culinary Arts

    • (2) The student develops skills for success in the workplace. The student is expected to:
      • (K) apply effective listening skills used in the workplace

    • (3) The student demonstrates work ethics, employer expectations, interaction with diverse populations and communication skills in the workplace. The student is expected to:
      • (B) demonstrate characteristics of successful working relationships such as teamwork, conflict resolution, self-control and the ability to accept criticism
      • (E) demonstrate ethical standards
    • (6) The student applies the use of self-development techniques and interpersonal skills to accomplish objectives. The student is expected to:
      • (A) identify and practice effective interpersonal and team-building skills involving situations with coworkers, managers and customers
    • (10) The student understands the history of food service and the use of the professional kitchen. The student is expected to:
      • (D) analyze how current trends in society affect the food service industry

    Restaurant Management

    • (3) The student solves problems using critical thinking, innovation and creativity independently and in teams. The student is expected to:
      • (A) generate creative ideas to solve problems by brainstorming possible solutions

    • (7) The student uses leadership and teamwork skills in collaborating with others to accomplish organizational goals and objectives. The student is expected to:
      • (A) apply team-building skills
      • (B) apply decision-making and problem-solving skills
      • (C) determine leadership and teamwork qualities to aid in creating a pleasant working atmosphere
      • (D) participate in community leadership and teamwork opportunities to enhance professional skills
    • (9) The student demonstrates an understanding that personal success depends on personal effort. The student is expected to:
      • (A) demonstrate a proactive understanding of self-responsibility and self-management
    • (12) The student understands the use of technical knowledge and skills required to pursue careers in the restaurant industry, including knowledge of design, operation and the maintenance of technological systems. The student is expected to:
      • (A) define job-specific technical vocabulary
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • identify industry vocabulary as it relates to sustainability
    • discuss the connection between sustainability and ethical standards
    • apply information on sustainability to problem-solve industry case studies
    • research, analyze, prioritize and apply sustainability and conservation practices
    • brainstorm ideas to assist their community practice sustainability
  • Rationale

    Current trends in the food service industry support communities. Gaining awareness of the importance of sustainability practices will allow students to understand business policies and procedures.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Four 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Brownfield site: A previously abandoned industrial site that, once cleaned up, can be repurposed for commercial business use

    Composting: A natural form of recycling that occurs when organic material decomposes to form organic fertilizer

    Conservation: The practice of limiting the use of a resource

    Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): A federal agency whose mission is to protect human health and the environment

    Food miles: The amount of travel that some food products must make to reach consumers

    Fossil fuels: Fuels that are formed from a plant source or animal remains buried deep in the earth, such as, natural gas, coal, propane and petroleum

    Green building: One that has been designed, built or renovated and reduces the overall impact on the environment

    LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design): Contractors and architects that have been trained in building facilities that comply with national standards for green construction

    Local source: Food produced in the surrounding growing region

    Overfishing: Catching a species at a faster rate than it can reproduce

    Renewable energy source: Does not rely on a finite supply of a resource, does not emit greenhouse gases or contribute to air pollution

    Repurposed food: Food that customers did not eat, but the back-of-the-house staff prepared, cooked, cooled and held safely (usually food that was prepared ahead of time but not sold)

    Sustainability: The practice that meets current resource needs without compromising the ability to meet future needs

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer for PowerPoint™ presentation
    • computer with Internet (be sure to follow school district guidelines)

    Materials:

    • butcher paper
    • stickers (round or Post® It Notes – various colors)
    • tape

    Supplies:

    • compost bucket (if available)
    • recycling bucket, trash can or box
    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Anticipatory Set

    Note to teacher:

    This lesson will assist the students in the Guided Practice section.

    Before class begins:

    Display as many of the materials and supplies from the Materials or Specialized Equipment Needed section as you have available on a table in front of the classroom.

    Prepare the Consensogram templates using the instructions on Back to the Future – Consensogram Template (see All Lesson Attachments tab) using butcher paper or the white/chalk board. Be sure to save the template to use in Lesson Closure.

    As students enter the classroom, distribute colored dot stickers or sticky notes to each student (one for each statement) and allow them to read the statement below each template. Students will place their stickers in the appropriate space.

    View the YouTube™ video:

    • Back to the Start
      The film, by film-maker Johnny Kelly, depicts the life of a farmer as he slowly turns his family farm into an industrial animal factory before seeing the errors of his ways and opting for a more sustainable future. Both the film and the soundtrack were commissioned by Chipotle to emphasize the importance of developing a sustainable food system.
      http://youtu.be/aMfSGt6rHos

    Ask students the following questions:

    • What do you think is happening in the video?
    • Do you agree with manufacturers adding enhancers to our food?
    • What changes can we make?
    • Why is sustainability important?
    • What can you do to make improve the recycling efforts in our community?
    • Is our community recycling, conserving water and reusing materials?
      Give some examples.

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce lesson objectives, terms and defintions.

    Distribute handout Back to the Future Notes (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that students may take notes during the slide presentation.

    Introduce PowerPoint™ Back to the Future – An Introduction to Sustainability in Food Service (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and lead a discussion about sustainability in our community.

    View video from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA):

    Other videos available:

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • assisting with notes
    • checking for understanding and clarification

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Note: Refer to the PowerPoint™ in the Service Learning with a Smile: Hospitality and Tourism lesson to clarify the FCCLA Planning Process.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/Service-Learning-with-a-Smile-PPTtm.pdf

    Distribute handout FCCLA Planning Process (see All Lesson Attachments tab) that will explain the decision-making process.

    As a class, brainstorm ideas that would benefit your community in practicing sustainability.

    Visit the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) website for ideas:

    • Reduce, Reuse, Recycle
      Learn how reducing, reusing, and recycling can help you, your community, and the environment by saving money, energy, and natural resources. Recycling programs are managed at the state and local level—find information on recycling in your community.
      http://www2.epa.gov/recycle

    Distribute the FCCLA Planning Process Worksheet (see All Lesson Attachments tab) to plan the community project.

    Refer also to Service Learning Projects for more ideas.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • encourage participation
    • check for understanding

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    There are many activities students can do to assist their community in the practicing recycling and sustainability.

    Allow students to work on the the community sustainability project as a team.

    Distribute Rubric for Community Leadership and Teamwork Experience (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that students will understand what is expected.

    Distribute handout Sustainability in Foodservice – Where We Stand Today E-Zine Article Review (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and allow students to read the article and answer the questions.

    Remind students of a vocabulary quiz at the end of the lesson.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • extended time
    • peer tutor

  • Lesson Closure

    Review lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Review the Back to the Future – Consensogram Template (see All Lesson Attachments tab) from the Anticipatory Set.

    Distribute different colored stickers to each student. Allow the students to put a new dot on the consensogram indicating their new level of understanding at the end of the lesson.

    Continue the discussion with your students reviewing the following statements and noting their answers on the board:

    • Explain the difference between sustainability and conservation.
    • A restaurant serves fresh bread each day. At the end of the day they have 10 to 15 loaves of leftover bread. Identify several options the restaurant may have in order to deal with the extra loaves.
    • What are the 3 R’s of conservation? Explain the difference between each.
  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Distribute handout Sustainability Vocabulary Quiz (see All Lesson Attachments tab) to assess the student’s knowledge.

    Students will be assessed with appropriate rubric.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • shortened quiz
    • quiz read orally

  • References/Resources

    Textbook:

    • Foundations of restaurant management and culinary arts, Level two. (2011). Boston: Prentice Hall.

    Website:

    • Reduce, Reuse, Recycle
      Learn how reducing, reusing, and recycling can help you, your community, and the environment by saving money, energy, and natural resources. Recycling programs are managed at the state and local level—find information on recycling in your community.
      http://www2.epa.gov/recycle

    YouTube™:

    • Back to the Start
      The film, by film-maker Johnny Kelly, depicts the life of a farmer as he slowly turns his family farm into an industrial animal factory before seeing the errors of his ways and opting for a more sustainable future. Both the film and the soundtrack were commissioned by Chipotle to emphasize the importance of developing a sustainable food system.
      http://youtu.be/aMfSGt6rHos
    • Food Scraps to Green Energy
      Food waste is the second largest portion of garbage going into landfills in the United States, accounting for over 30 million tons each year.
      http://youtu.be/vhyekv1V32s
      Accessible version:
      http://www.epa.gov/region09/waste/features/foodtoenergy/
  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • use “word wall” for vocabulary words
    • work with a peer tutor
    • peer to read materials
    • highlighted materials for emphasis
    • shortened simplified instructions
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    Encourage students to demonstrate sustainability practices in the lab settings. A container may be set aside to begin a compost pile of the scraps of food that are not used in the lab. This compost pile may be donated to the horticulture program, if your school has one available, to use as fertilizer or to community members who are growing gardens.

    Sustainable Food Service Webquest

    Distribute handout Sustainable Food Service Webquest (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and encourage students to research the answers to the problems on website below.

    http://www.sustainablefoodservice.com/

    Infographic:

    Infographics are graphic visual representations of information, data or knowledge intended to present complex information quickly and clearly.

    The infographic below is related to this lesson. Allow students to view the image on a projector and lead a discussion concerning the information provided.

    TED Talks:

    TED is a nonprofit organization devoted to spreading ideas, usually in the form of short, powerful talks (18 minutes or less).

    The video below is related to this lesson. Allow students to view the video and lead a discussion concerning the TED Talk.

    • Leyla Acaroglu: Paper beats plastic? How to rethink environmental folklore
      Most of us want to do the right thing when it comes to the environment. But things aren’t as simple as opting for the paper bag says sustainability strategist Leyla Acaroglu. A bold call for us to let go of tightly-held green myths and think bigger in order to create systems and products that ease strain on the planet.
      http://www.ted.com/talks/leyla_acaroglu_paper_beats_plastic_how_to_rethink_environmental_folklore
  • Family/Community Connection

    Involve family and friends in a community recycling program. Encourage them to recycle items so there is little or no waste.

    Visit the EPA website for ideas:

    • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
      Wastes – What You Can Do
      At Home and in the Garden
      The best place to start making a difference is right in your own home. Learn how you can reduce, reuse, and recycle materials to decrease household waste!
      http://www.epa.gov/waste/wycd/homeandgarden.htm

  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career, Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)

    http://www.texasfccla.org

    • Star Events:
      • Environmental Ambassador
        An individual or team event – recognizes participants that address environmental issues that adversely impact human health and well-being and who actively empower others to get involved.
      • Hospitality, Tourism, and Recreation
        An individual or team event, recognizes participants who demonstrate their knowledge of the hospitality, tourism, and recreation industries and ability to translate their knowledge into a hypothetical or real business. Project must relate to culinary, lodging, recreation, tourism, or event coordination.
      • Illustrated Talk
        An individual or team event – recognizes participants who make an oral presentation about issues concerning Family and Consumer Sciences and/or related occupations. Participants use visuals to illustrate content of the presentation.

    SkillsUSA

    • Community Action Project (Demonstration)
      Purpose: To evaluate the ability of a team of two contestants to develop, execute, document and present a project that was completed in their community or school, which provides a benefit to the community or the school. To evaluate local activities that benefit the community and to recognize excellence and professionalism in the area of community service. This event also enables the community to become aware of the outstanding work being performed by career and technical education students.
  • Service Learning Projects

    True service learning is developed with student voice about concerns and needs. As the students are learning and researching this topic, ask them to think about ways they can maximize their learning to benefit others.
    For more information, visit:
    www.ysa.org

    Brainstorm with your students for a service project pertaining to this lesson. Ask students how they will use what they have learned about marketing and communications.

    Example:

    • if your school does not have one, start a recycling program
    • collaborate with a local garden club and elementary school to create a community garden and upon harvesting, make a meal using items grown in the garden