Assessing What is Being Taught

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Education and Training

    Course : Instructional Practices in Education and Training

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (6) The student assesses teaching and learning. The student is expected to:
      • (A) describe the role of assessment as part of the learning process
      • (B) analyze the assessment process
      • (C) identify appropriate assessment strategies for use in an instructional setting
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • Describe the role of assessments on the learning process
    • Distinguish between formative and summative assessments
    • Write examples of appropriate and effective exam questions
    • Describe the reasoning teachers use in choosing appropriate assessment strategies
    • Develop questions a teacher might use for course evaluation
  • Rationale

    Script:

    How can a teacher know if students have grasped the concepts being taught? In what ways can teachers assess their students’ knowledge? Does it always have to be a multiple choice, paper-based exam? In this lesson you will learn the importance of assessing students’ work.
  • Duration of Lesson

    Four 45 minute class period.

  • Word Wall

    Alternative assessment: A method of assessing learning other than through testing

    Checklist: A simple list of items to be noted, checked, or remembered when evaluating learning

    Course evaluation: Making judgements about how well a course meets its goals and identifying suggestions for improvements

    Formative assessment: Assessment that is meant to provide feedback about students’ learning and understanding while the learning is occurring, rather than after it is completed

    Mentor teachers: Experienced, skilled teachers paired with new teachers to help them improve their skills, solve problems, and become comfortable in their new role

    Peer evaluation: Students’ assessment of each others learning

    Reliability: A characteristic of assessments that measures learning consistently and fairly, even with different groups or under different circumstances

    Rubric: A scoring tool that lists the criteria for judging a particular type of work, describing levels of quality for each of the criteria and often organized as a chart, with the criteria on the left, followed by columns that describe different levels of quality for each characteristic

    Score card: A tool for evaluating alternative assessment that lists the characteristics or factors to use when evaluating learning, typically identifying a maximum point value for each criterion but without descriptions of levels of quality

    Self evaluation: Students’ assessment of their own learning

    Student portfolio: A collection of a student’s work selected to show growth over time; to highlight skills and achievements or to show how well the student meets standards

    Summative assessment: Assessment designed to evaluate students’ learning after instruction has taken place, measuring results and determining whether learning objectives have been met

    Validity: A characteristic of assessments that actually measures the learning objectives

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer lab with Internet access
    • computer with projector for multimedia presentation
    • presenter/remote

    Materials:

    • copies of various types of exams from a variety of sources from the elementary, middle and high school levels
    • district grading policy
    • highlighters
    • markers
    • paper
    • pen

    • copies of handouts ( see All Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Anticipatory Set

    Prior to the lesson:

    Gather a variety of both summative and formative assessments such as (but not limited to) exams, reports, brochures, games, portfolios, projects, quizzes, essay exams and rubric. Locate a copy of the district grading policy and make copies for each student. This will be used later in the lesson.

    Before class begins, distribute the assessment examples throughout the classroom on the student desks or tables.

    __

    As class begins, tell students to walk throughout the room looking at each type of assessment. Tell the students to pay attention to the assessment and its directions. After students have had about 10 minutes to look through all of the assessments, have them sit in groups of about five students each.

    Ask students the following questions (to be discussed in groups):

    • Which type of assessment is your favorite and why?
    • Which type of assessment is a better reflection on student performance?
    • How can a grading rubric be helpful for students when completing projects and assignments?
    • Are there any other types of assessments you have been given in class that I do not have an example of in class that you found interesting? (Ask them to explain the project/exam.)
    • Do you know the district’s grading policy? (See how many of the students actually know what the policy is. Then hand out a copy of the policy to each student to review.)
    • Why is it important to have a district-wide grading policy?
    • What factors can alter a student’s Grade Point Average (GPA)?
    • Why might projects, exams and other assignments be weighted differently?
  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce lesson objective, terms, and definitions.

    Distribute the handout, KWHL Chart – Assessing What is Being Taught (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Students will fill out the first three columns of the chart. Ask students to write down what they already know about assessments, what they want to know about assessments and how they can find more information about assessments. The last column will be completed during lesson closure.

    Introduce PowerPoint™ Assessing What is Being Taught (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Students will be expected to take notes while viewing the slide presentation.

    Distribute handout, Alternative Assessments (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Students will list as many alternative assessments as they can think of.

    Distribute handout, Venn Diagram (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Students will compare and contrast formative and summative assessments.

    Distribute handout, T-Chart (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Students will write down the advantages and disadvantages of providing students with a grading rubric prior to grading the assignment.

    Individual Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • checking for understanding
    • providing assistance with note-taking
    • providing extra time for oral response
    • frequent feedback

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Distribute handout, Constructing Tests (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Inform students they will be taking notes as you read over the things teachers should consider when creating assessments.

    Distribute handout, Types of Test Questions (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Inform students they will be creating sample test questions based on a variety of different types of assessments.

    Distribute handout, Assessments (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Inform students they will create a variety of assessments based upon specific lesson plans. Students will work on the assignment independently completing the task.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • check for understanding
    • providing extra time for oral response
    • frequent feedback
    • providing peer tutoring
    • reducing length of assignment

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Students will work independently completing their assignment Assessments (see All Lesson Attachment tab).

    Review assignment rubric so that students are aware of assessment procedures.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • check for understanding
    • providing extra time for oral response
    • frequent feedback
    • providing peer tutoring
    • reducing length of assignment
    • assisting student in gathering information
    • providing praise and encouragement

  • Lesson Closure

    Review lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Complete graphic organizer, KWHL Chart – Assessing What is Being Taught (see All Lesson Attachments tab) to analyze what they have learned about assessments.

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Student presentations will be assessed with appropriate rubric provided during Guided Practice.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • grading according to work done
    • providing praise and encouragement

  • References/Resources

    Textbooks:

    • Cooper, J.M, Ryan, K. (2000). Those Who Can, Teach Ninth Edition. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin Company.
    • Henke-Konopasek, N. (2010). Student Workbook Teaching. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.
    • Kato, S.L. (2010). Teaching. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.
    • Wong, H., Wong, R. (1998). The First Days Of School. Mountainview, CA: Harry K. Wong Publications, Inc.

    Web sites:

  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    Have students pair up with teachers on another campus, such as an elementary campus. Students should work closely with the teacher developing lessons and assessments. Have the teacher evaluate the students’ ability to effectively deliver the lesson and the method of assessment chosen by the student.

    In addition to creating lessons and assessments, students could work with the teacher to create student portfolios for each child that display student progress throughout the year.

    TED Talks:

    TED is a nonprofit devoted to spreading ideas, usually in the form of short, powerful talks (18 minutes or less). The video below is related to this lesson. Allow students to view the video and lead a discussion concerning the TED Talk.

    • Bill Gates: Teachers need real feedback
      Until recently, many teachers only got one word of feedback a year: “satisfactory.” And with no feedback, no coaching, there’s just no way to improve. Bill Gates suggests that even great teachers can get better with smart feedback — and lays out a program from his foundation to bring it to every classroom.
      http://www.ted.com/talks/bill_gates_teachers_need_real_feedback
  • Family/Community Connection

    Invite teachers, administrators, counselors, diagnosticians and professors from the district and area colleges to speak to the students about assessments. Have the guests speak to the class about different types of assessments, their role in providing assessments, the benefits of assessments and how one can become a teacher, administrator, counselor, diagnostician or professor.

  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career, Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)

    http://www.texasfccla.org

    STAR Events:

    • Teach and Train – An individual event that recognizes participants for their exploration of the education and training fields through research and hands-on experience.
    • Interpersonal Communication – An individual or team event that recognizes participants who use Family and Consumer Sciences and/or related occupations skills and apply communication techniques to develop a project designed to strengthen communication.
    • Job Interviewing – An individual event that recognizes participants who use Family and Consumer Sciences and/or related occupations skills to develop a portfolio, participate in an interview, and communicate a personal understanding of job requirements.

    SkillsUSA

    http://skillsusa.org

    Skills USA Events:

    • Early Childhood Education – an individual event that recognizes participants who demonstrate their knowledge of developmentally appropriate practice and their ability to prepare and implement learning activities for children 3 to 5 years old. Students will prepare a written lesson plan and take a written test assessing their knowledge of child development and effective teaching strategies.

    Texas Association of Future Educators (TAFE)

    http://tafeonline.org

    TAFE Events:

    • Lesson Planning and Delivery Competition – This competition is an individual event where future educators will plan, prepare and deliver a lesson of their choosing to an actual classroom of students. Self-reflection following the lesson is an essential component of this competition as future educators begin the practice of honing their own teaching skills. Participants will prepare a lesson plan and a 10 minute video teaching the lesson to a class. The lesson can focus either on CTE, Humanities or STEM.
  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to the lesson. For additional information on service learning, see http://www.servicelearningtexas.org

    Possible idea:

    Have students offer an “Assessment Review” opportunity for teachers in their district. This review is for any teacher interested in seeking a new and innovative way of assessing students’ knowledge. This could be especially beneficial to teachers who have been teaching for several years and are looking for a fresh idea to test students’ knowledge, or for new teachers who are looking for ideas in the classroom. Have interested teachers bring or email the current lesson and assessment to the classroom. Then have students review the lesson and assessment and create a new innovative way of assessing the students.