Are You a Cook or a Culinarian?

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Hospitality and Tourism

    Course : Culinary Arts

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (1) The student applies advanced reading, writing, mathematics and science skills for the food service industry. The student is expected to:
      • (A) compose industry appropriate documents
    • (2) The student integrates listening, writing, and speaking skills using verbal and nonverbal communication to enhance operations, guest satisfaction, and professional development. The student is expected to:
      • (A) create formal or informal presentations
    • (3) The student demonstrates an understanding that personal success depends on personal effort. The student is expected to:
      • (B) explain the characteristics of personal values and principles
      • (C ) demonstrate positive attitudes and work habit
      • (D) demonstrate exemplary appearance and personal hygiene
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • investigate the importance of professionalism
    • outline the qualities of a professional culinarian
    • outline the ideal clothing appearance and cleanliness of a professional chef
  • Rationale

    Script:

    How amazing would it be if there was a recipe that would make you a successful culinary professional? Basic ingredients might include: knowledge, skills, judgment, dedication, pride, and respect.

    Allow students to brainstorm and add additional qualities to list.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Two 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Brigade: A system of staffing a kitchen so that each worker is assigned a set of specific tasks. These tasks are often related by cooking method, equipment, or the types of foods being served

    Commitment: Professional status, methods, character, or standards

    Culinarian: One who studied and continues to study the art of cooking. All professional culinarians must first learn the foundations of their profession, handling ingredients and equipment as well as traditional techniques and recipes

    Honesty: Being truthful and loyal in your words and actions

    Professionalism: Professional status, methods, character, or standards

    Respect: Having consideration for oneself and others

    Toque: A toque is the tall, white hat traditionally worn by chefs. Most chefs’ now wear a standard 6 – 9 inch high toque. A chef’s rank in the kitchen often dictates the type of hat he or she wears

    Umami: Savory – There are five basic tastes: salt, sour, bitter, sweet, and umami (or savory)

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for PowerPoint™ presentation
    • Internet access for YouTube

    Materials:

    • apron
    • certifications
    • chef jacket, pants, and hat
    • culinary textbooks
    • glue sticks
    • magazines
    • poster board
    • scissors
    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Anticipatory Set

    Before class begins:

    Set out samples of chef wear such as jacket, apron, pants, hat, etc. (each item will be reviewed during Direct Instruction).

    Culinary textbooks and certifications can also be set out to show knowledge and skills as part of professionalism.

    Daily Appetizer (journal entry) is displayed for students. See writing strategies for more journal entries.

    • List and justify five attributes of a culinary professional.

    Have students take turns sharing their lists with the class.

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce lesson terms, definitions, and objectives.

    Distribute handout Attributes of a Culinary Professional (see All Lesson Attachments tab) for student note taking.

    Introduce PowerPoint(tm Professionalism I (see all Lessons Attachments tab). Allow time for questions and group discussion. Focus on slide 4 “Lack of Professionalism”.

    Think/Pair/Share Strategy:

    Have students take a moment to think, reflect as to why this situation may have occurred and how it could have been avoided. Have students pair up with another person and share their thoughts. Allow a two minutes discussion. Have students share their thoughts with the class.

    Distribute handout A Professional Chef Uniform (see All Lessons Attachment tab) for note taking.

    Introduce PowerPoint™ Professionalism II: Culinary Uniforms (see All Lesson Attachment tab). While watching video have students diagram the components of a chef uniform.

    After the slide presentation, students may try on school issued chef jackets for size or may be measured for size to purchase chef jackets. Discuss your expectations for the use of the chef uniform in the lab and/or culinary events.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommdations may include, but are not limited to:

    • providing copy of slide presentation and notes
    • using graphic organizer for taking notes

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce collage project. Each collage is expected to be unique and have a specific theme; for example:

    • Professional Behavior
    • Professional Appearance
    • Professional Ability
    • What it means to be “Professional”

    Review components of Rubrics for Professionalism Collage Project (see All Lessons Attachments tab) which will be used to assess project. Stress that professionalism means many things to different people. Print several copies of The Culinarian’s Code so students will be able to gain ideas and use as a reference for their project.

    Students can create collage using magazine pictures, computer clip art, or word art. Project must address a minimum of eight qualities and/or attributes of a culinary professional.

    Depending on resources, a collage could be created on poster board, butcher paper, construction paper, or an electronic poster (http://www.glogster.com).

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommdations may include, but are not limited to:

    • working with a peer tutor
    • reducing length of assignment
    • allowing extra time for completion of assignment

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Observe and provide assistance as students create their project. Provide one to two class periods for completion of assignment.

    If students do not finish assignment in class, they may complete it at home.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommdations may include, but are not limited to:

    • working with peer tutor
    • providing extended time for completion of project

  • Lesson Closure

    Review terms, definitions and objectives.

    Have students create a bumper sticker depicting the most important concept they personally learned from this lesson.

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Students will present Professionalism Collage Project to the class and display in classroom or hallway.

    Projects will be assessed with rubric.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommdations may include, but are not limited to:

    • giving encouragement and praise
    • making allowances as needed
    • building rapport with students

  • References/Resources

    Textbooks:

    • Johnson & Wales University, . Culinary Essentials. New York, New York: Glenco, McGraw-Hill, 2002. Print.
    • National Restaurant Association, . Foundations of Restaurant Management & Culinary Arts. Level One. Boston: Prentice Hall, 2011. Print.

    Website:

    • The Professional Chef Uniform
      Uploaded by NAITCulinaryArts on Aug 31, 2010
      As a professional chef your uniform is your first line of defense for safety protection. Let’s review what a safely dressed chef looks like.
      http://youtu.be/4uPYHDwVwzU
  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • word Wall
    • use of graphic organizer to facilitate understanding of text
    • allow extra processing time
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Recommended Strategies

    Reading Strategies

    Other articles pertaining to this lesson students may read include:

    • History of Chef Coats
      The chef in most restaurants will be seen wearing a specific uniform. The hat, pants and coat of this uniform have specific functions. The coat of this uniform has been worn by chefs for more than a hundred years with little change in its design. While the colors and buttons of the coats may change over the years, the basic design features remain the same and have both safety and functional features that are difficult to improve upon.
      http://www.ehow.com/about_5032990_history-chef-coats.html
    • What Is the Difference Between White & Black Chef Jackets?
      Most people outside the restaurant industry have a very clear idea of how a chef normally dresses. There is a tall white hat, usually with several pleats in it. The kerchief around the neck is optional, but the black pants and white jacket are what customers have come to expect. In reality, standards have changed and black chef jackets are now common.
      http://www.ehow.com/info_8587540_difference-white-black-chef-jackets.html

    Reading strategy:
    Encourage students to “visualize” as they read. Many students are visual learners and will benefit from making sketches or diagrams on scrap paper as they read. Providing students with graphic organizers to help them organize their thoughts is also helpful.

  • Quotes

    Excellence is not an act, it is a habit. You do not get up one day and decide to be excellent…and then take a day off from being excellent.
    -paraphrased from Aristotle

    We are ladies and gentlemen serving ladies and gentlemen.
    -Hermann G. Rusch

    If you would not want to eat it, then why would you ask your guest to eat it?
    -William “Bill” Chesser, CEA, AAC

  • Multimedia/Visual Strategies

    PowerPoint™:

    • Professionalism I
    • Professionalism II
    • Presentation Notes – Professionalism I
    • Presentation Notes – Professionalism II

    Technology:

    • Infographics:
      • The Anatomy of A Top Chef
        Learn about the best dressed “Top Chef’s” in America. What kind of chef coats do these culinary masters prefer? What kind of knives do the Iron Chefs use? Our new infographic lets you know the ins and outs of a professional chef from top to bottom and everywhere in between. We started with the very basic uniform needs, like a proper chef’s hat, and naturally progress to unique and specific tools of the trade like the carbon steel chef’s knife. After reading this, you’ll know how to equip yourself to cook with the best of them!
        http://www.chefworks.com/uniforms/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/anatomy-of-a-top-chef-infographic-2.png

    YouTube:

    • The Professional Chef Uniform
      As a professional chef your uniform is your first line of defense for safety protection.
      http://youtu.be/4uPYHDwVwzU

    Files for downloading:

  • Graphic Organizers/Handout

    Graphic Organizer:

    • Attributes of a Culinary Professional

    Handouts:

    • Culinarian’s Code
    • A Professional Chef Uniform
    • Rubric for Professionalism Collage Project

    Files for downloading:

  • Writing Strategies

    Journal Entries – Daily Appetizer:

    • What does being courteous mean to you?
    • To me being responsible means …..
    • Of the five basic tastes, my favorite is……
    • Why does a culinary professional also have to be an artist? scientist? business person? explorer?

    Writing Strategies:

    • RAFT
      Role: culinary student
      Audience: local chef
      Format: formal letter
      Topic: What being a culinary professional means to me
    • Professionalism means many things as you have learned. What do you personally think is the most important part of being a culinary professional and why? Write a letter to someone – a chef or food service manager letting him or her know what professionalism means to you.
    • This writing assignment will be added to the student’s portfolio.
  • Communication 90 Second Speech Topics

    • Explain and demonstrate why chef jackets are double breasted
    • Explain the relevance and demonstrate the different heights of chef hats
  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    After reading the Culinarian’s Code, have students complete one of the following:

    1. Write a paragraph about what the code means to you. Is this code still relevant in today’s culinary kitchen? Why? Why not?
    2. Create a brochure about the code.
    3. Create signs about the code to hang in the room.
    4. Research one code and present new findings to the class.

    Infographic:

    Infographics are graphic visual representations of information, data or knowledge intended to present complex information quickly and clearly.

    The infographic below is related to this lesson. Allow students to view the image on a projector and lead a discussion concerning the information provided.

    • The Anatomy of A Top Chef
      Learn about the best dressed “Top Chef’s” in America. What kind of chef coats do these culinary masters prefer? What kind of knives do the Iron Chefs use? Our new infographic lets you know the ins and outs of a professional chef from top to bottom and everywhere in between. We started with the very basic uniform needs, like a proper chef’s hat, and naturally progress to unique and specific tools of the trade like the carbon steel chef’s knife. After reading this, you’ll know how to equip yourself to cook with the best of them!
      http://www.chefworks.com/uniforms/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/anatomy-of-a-top-chef-infographic-2.png
  • Family/Community Connection

    Guest speaker: Professional Chef
    Ask students if they have family members who manage a restaurant, work the back of the house, or are chefs themselves. Invite them to the classroom for a demonstration and/or speak to the class.

  • CTSO connection

    Family Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)
    http://www.texasfccla.org

    STAR Events:

    • Culinary Arts: A team event that recognizes participants enrolled in occupational culinary arts/food service training programs for their ability to work as members of a team to produce a quality meal using industrial culinary arts/ food service techniques and equipment.
    • Interpersonal Communication: An individual or team event that recognizes participants who apply interior design skills learned in Family and Consumer Sciences courses to design interiors that meet the living space needs of clients.
    • Leadership: An individual event which recognizes participants who actively evaluate and grow in their leadership potential. Participants use the Student Leadership Challenge and supporting materials to investigate their leadership abilities and develop a mentorship relationship to further their leadership development.
    • Power of One (A National Program): Power of One helps students find and use their personal power. Members set their own goals, work to achieve them, and enjoy the results. The skills members learn in Power of One help them now and in the future in school, with friends and family, in their future at college, and on the job.
    • Dynamic Leadership ( National Program): The FCCLA Dynamic Leadership helps young people build leadership skills. It provides information, activities, and project ideas to help young people
      • learn about leadership,
      • recognize the lifelong benefits of leadership skills ,
      • practice leadership skills through FCCLA involvement , and
      • become strong leaders for families, careers, and communities.
    • Leaders at Work (National Program): Leaders at Work recognizes FCCLA members who create projects to strengthen leadership skills on the job. These skills contribute to success across a broad range of career fields. In conjunction with the Career Connection national program, Leaders at Work motivates students to prepare for career success.

    Skills USA: http://www.skillsusa.org

    • A job skill demonstration competition
      Contestants demonstrate and explain an entry-level skill used in the occupational area for which they are training. Competitors in Job Skill A must demonstrate a career objective in an occupational area that is included in one of the contest areas of the Skills USA Championships.
  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to professionalism. For additional information on service learning see http://www.ysa.org

    Suggestion:
    Role-play qualities of culinary professionalism (both good and bad) to elementary students.

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