A Look at Qualities of Effective Schools

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Education and Training

    Course : Instructional Practices in Education and Training

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • 1) The student explores the teacher and training profession. The student is expected to:
      • (D) identify qualities of effective schools
    • (3) The student communicates effectively. The student is expected to:
      • (A) demonstrate effective verbal, non-verbal, written and electronic communication skills
      • (B) communicate effectively in situations with educators and parents or guardians
      • (D) demonstrate effective communication skills in teaching and training
    • (8) The student develops technology skills. The student is expected to:
      • (C) demonstrate skillful use of technology as a tool for instruction, evaluation and management
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • identify characteristics of effective schools
    • explore qualities of effective schools
    • explain the relationship between effective schools and students, faculty and staff members
    • present a technology application on effective schools
  • Rationale

    Script:

    What does an effective school mean to you? What qualifies a school as being an effective school? What qualities of a school determine its effectiveness? Do location, socio-economic status and parental involvement matter to the effectiveness of a school? Do you believe this school is an effective school? While all schools might need improvement in one area or another, all schools can be effective. Let’s find out what makes an effective school and how it can affect you as you pursue a career in education.

  • Duration of Lesson

    Five 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    The terms and definitions to be used with this lesson will be generated by the students. Terms that may be addressed include:

    Achievement:

    Characteristics:

    Effective:

    Quality:

    Socio-economic status:

    Success:

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for multimedia presentation
    • computers with Internet access (be sure to follow school district guidelines)
    • light projector (Elmo)

    Materials:

    • images of private and public schools
    • images of schools within the school district
    • images of schools outside of the school district
    • images of colleges and universities

    Supplies:

    • index cards

    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Anticipatory Set

    Before class begins:

    Display as many items from the Materials or Specialized Equipment Needed tab as you have available on a table in front of the room so that students may view as they enter.

    Divide the class into subgroups of four or five students.

    Distribute the graphic organizer Characteristics of Effective Schools (see All Lesson Attachments tab) to each group and instruct students to brainstorm key words that would describe an effective school.

    Possible answers are located in the Characteristics of Effective Schools (example) (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Other terms may also be used.

    Ask the following questions:

    • What do you think makes an effective school?
    • What are the qualities of an effective school?
    • Why did you think _________ is part of an effective school?

    The completed graphic organizer Characteristics of Effective Schools will be used in the Lesson Closure tab.

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Distribute graphic organizer Qualities of Effective Schools Note-Taking (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that students may take notes during slide presentation.

    NOTE TO TEACHER: The purpose of this lesson is to provide students with a model for investigating the qualities of an effective school. The sole purpose of the slide presentation is to assist them in developing the type of questions they would like answered. Learning will be completely student led.

    Introduce slide presentation Qualities of Effective Schools (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and lead brainstorming as slides are viewed. Presentation Notes for Qualities of Effective Schools (see All Lesson Attachment tabs) have been provided to assist with dialog during the presentation. Allow time for student questions and discussion.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • check for understanding
    • note-taking assistance

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Distribute the handout FCCLA Planning Process (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and review the five steps to assist in the decision-making process.

    Divide the class into subgroups of four or five students or use the same groups as in the Anticipatory Set.

    Read the following scenario:

    You are a member of the Site-Based Decision Making Committee for your school district. The committee has been charged with making improvements to your campus. How will your group decide what to do?

    Place the teacher resource Site-Based Decision Making (see All Lesson Attachments tab) on a light projector and explain to the students what the committee does.

    Distribute the handout FCCLA Planning Process Worksheet (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and instruct students to use the five steps on the worksheet to brainstorm with their group an area that needs improvement in their school.

    Based on student findings, as a class, determine terms and definitions for lesson word wall. A word cloud program such as one below may created with the selected terms and definitions. View the teacher resource Tagxedo™ example (see Graphic Organizers/Handouts tab) for ideas.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • peer tutor
    • encourage participation

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Once again, divide the class into subgroups of three or four students or continue to use the same teams from previous activity.

    Read the following scenario to the groups:

    Once again you are serving on the Site-Based Decision Making Committee for your school district. The board of directors has asked that the committee make a short presentation to the district at the professional development identifying the qualities of an effective school and its effect on student success in the classroom. How will your team present your findings to the district during the professional development that is informative, yet presented in an exciting way, to get teachers and staff members pumped up for the upcoming school year?

    Distribute the handout FCCLA Planning Process Worksheet (see All Lesson Attachments tab) to each team and instruct the students to utilize this handout or other decision-making organizers to plan your project.

    Students may use one of several media presentation programs available in the Classroom Essentials section:

    Review the Rubric for Professional Development Presentation (see All Lesson Attachments tab) so that students understand how their project will be assessed.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • reduce assignment
    • group with peer tutors

  • Lesson Closure

    Review lesson objectives, terms and definitions.

    Review the completed graphic organizer Characteristics of Effective Schools from the Anticipatory Set from each group on a light projector.

    Ask each group to discuss their ideas with the class and if they think their own school fits their description of an effective school.

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Each team will present their In-Service Presentation.

    Projects will be assessed with the appropriate rubric.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • assistance with presentation
    • praise participation

  • References/Resources

    Images:

    • Photos obtained through a license with Shutterstock.com™.

    Textbooks:

    • Diaz, C., Pelletier, C. & Provenzo, Jr., E. (2006). Touch the future: teaching! Boston, MA: Pearson Education, Inc.
    • Kauchak, D. & Eggen, P. (2014). Introduction to teaching: becoming a professional. Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc.
    • Morrison, G. (2012). Early childhood education today. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc.

    Websites:

  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    Provide student(s) with index cards.

    Allow student(s) to create Vocabulary Cards for each lesson term in the following manner:

    • the word and its definition in the front
    • a drawing and the vocabulary word in a sentence in the back

    Cards can be accumulated throughout the school year and kept on a binder ring.

  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Recommended Strategies

    Reading Strategies

    Other articles pertaining to this lesson:

    Reading Strategies
    Allow students to utilize Word Attack Strategies with this or any other topic related article.
    Prior to reading, allow students to skim the passage or text, circling words that are unfamiliar to them. Once these words are decoded (glossary, dictionary, dictionary.com, classroom discussion), students will have a better understanding of the pronunciation and meaning of the unfamiliar word(s), facilitating comprehension.

  • Quotes

    The principle goal of education in the schools should be creating men and women who are capable of doing new things, not simply repeating what other generations have done.
    -Jean Piaget

    Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.
    -Nelson Mandela

    Intelligence plus character-that is the goal of true education.
    -Martin Luther King Jr.

    An ethical leader demonstrates concern for the welfare of students by placing it as the chief value that influences all decision making.
    -American Association of the School Administrators Code of Ethics

  • Multimedia/Visual Strategies

    PowerPoint™:

    • A Look at Qualities of Effective Schools
    • Presentation Notes – A Look at Qualities of Effective Schools

    Technology:

    Files for downloading:

  • Graphic Organizers/Handout

    Graphic Organizers:

    • Characteristics of Effective Schools
    • Characteristics of Effective Schools (example)
    • Effective Schools Project Options

    Handouts:

    • FCCLA Planning Process Worksheet
    • FCCLA Planning Process
    • Qualities of Effective Schools Note-Taking
    • Rubric for Professional Development Presentation

    Teacher Resource:

    • Site-Based Decision Making
    • Tagxedo™ example
      Tagxedo example

    Files for downloading:

  • Writing Strategies

    Journal Entries:

    • What is an effective school?
    • What are the qualities or characteristics of an effective school?
    • How does an effective school make an impact on the student, teacher or faculty?

    Writing Strategy:

    • RAFT (Role/Audience/Format/Topic) writing strategy:
      • Role – superintendent
      • Audience – faculty and staff members
      • Format – memo
      • Topic – becoming an effective school

    Write a memo to the faculty and staff about becoming an effective school.

  • Communication 90 Second Speech Topics

    • Three things I have learned about qualities of effective schools are….
    • Effective schools ….
    • The benefits of effective schools are …
  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    Invite the district superintendent to speak to the class on the qualities and characteristics of an effective school.

  • Family/Community Connection

    Have students compile video clips along with the audio visual department from their interviews during the project to create a short video presentation.

    Students may display the video presentation at the district in-service, within the community or during a PTO/PTA meeting.

  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)

    http://www.texasfccla.org

    Star Events

    • Early Childhood
      Purpose: To evaluate participants who use Family and Consumer Sciences skills to plan and conduct a child development project that has a positive impact on children and the community.
    • Focus on Children
      Purpose: To evaluate participants who organize a community service project focused on a specific need related to children in the community.
    • Teach and Train
      Purpose: To evaluate participants for their exploration of the education and training fields through research and hands-on experience.

    SkillsUSA

    http://www.skillsusa.org/

    SkillUSA Events

    • Community Action Project (Demonstration)
      Purpose: To evaluate a team of two contestants ability to develop, execute, document and present a project that was completed in their community or school, which provides a benefit to the community or the school. To evaluate local activities that benefit the community and to recognize excellence and professionalism in the area of community service. This event also enables the community to become aware of the outstanding work being performed by career and technical education students.

    Texas Association of Future Educators

    http://tafeonline.org

    TAFE Events

    • Bulletin Board Competition
      Purpose: To evaluate an individual or team participants who demonstrate their knowledge, skills and ability to create a bulletin board display for teaching and/or for student interaction. Participants must prepare a display board and an oral presentation introducing the display and summarizing how it could be used in a classroom setting to teach a lesson. The display board may be no larger than 36” x 48”.
    • Creative Lecture Competition
      Purpose: To evaluate an individual who demonstrate valuable skills for all educators. Storytelling and effective oral communication skills are vital qualities for professional success. Captivating an audience and sustaining their attention and wonder with a compelling topic remains one of the most valuable abilities in an increasingly networked society.
    • Project Visualize Contest
      Purpose: To evaluate a team’s presentation on one of their chapter’s projects. The project must be from one of the areas of the TRAFLES. Contestants will thematically construct a cardboard tri-fold display (36” x 48”). Participants must prepare a display and an oral presentation introducing the display and summarizing the project.
    • Service Project Presentation Competition
      Purpose: To evaluate a team’s service project presentation. The team must prepare a display and an oral presentation introducing the display and summarizing the project.
  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to this lesson.
    www.ysa.org

    Possible ideas:

    Students may compile a list of items that would improve the school campus and visit with the principal to plan a project or projects to accomplish one or more of the items.

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